Georgia BAH Rates 2023

Georgia - Wormsloe Historic Site, Savannah, GA

2023 BAH Rates and Post-9/11 GI Bill MHA Rates for Georgia

Find BAH Rates Rates for Georgia broken down by city, pay grade, and dependency status.  For Post 911 GI Bill BAH Rates, please use E-5 with Dependents to determine monthly housing allowance.

BAH Rate Calculator 2023

Dependents
 
$0
Per Month
BAH Allowance

Albany, GA BAH Rates

PaygradeWithWithout
E01 $1,143 $939
E02 $1,143 $939
E03 $1,143 $939
E04 $1,143 $939
E05 $1,215 $1,014
E06 $1,326 $1,071
E07 $1,485 $1,140
E08 $1,662 $1,248
E09 $1,881 $1,410
W01 $1,341 $1,134
W02 $1,560 $1,239
W03 $1,776 $1,413
W04 $1,926 $1,467
W05 $2,103 $1,629
O01E $1,515 $1,209
O02E $1,743 $1,308
O03E $1,950 $1,464
O01 $1,236 $1,068
O02 $1,323 $1,191
O03 $1,770 $1,416
O04 $2,166 $1,626
O05 $2,448 $1,836
O06 $2,466 $1,851
O07 $2,484 $1,863

Schools in Athens, Georgia

Atlanta, GA BAH Rates

PaygradeWithWithout
E01 $2,163 $1,704
E02 $2,163 $1,704
E03 $2,163 $1,704
E04 $2,163 $1,704
E05 $2,262 $1,929
E06 $2,406 $2,061
E07 $2,424 $2,160
E08 $2,433 $2,298
E09 $2,481 $2,328
W01 $2,421 $2,139
W02 $2,430 $2,295
W03 $2,442 $2,331
W04 $2,511 $2,400
W05 $2,625 $2,406
O01E $2,427 $2,256
O02E $2,436 $2,322
O03E $2,523 $2,394
O01 $2,289 $2,055
O02 $2,403 $2,232
O03 $2,439 $2,349
O04 $2,661 $2,403
O05 $2,841 $2,409
O06 $2,865 $2,412
O07 $2,886 $2,433

Schools in Atlanta

Dahlonega, GA BAH Rates

PaygradeWithWithout
E01 $1,851 $1,539
E02 $1,851 $1,539
E03 $1,851 $1,539
E04 $1,851 $1,539
E05 $1,953 $1,665
E06 $2,205 $1,752
E07 $2,253 $1,848
E08 $2,304 $2,010
E09 $2,400 $2,073
W01 $2,223 $1,830
W02 $2,274 $2,007
W03 $2,340 $2,082
W04 $2,427 $2,211
W05 $2,535 $2,262
O01E $2,256 $1,947
O02E $2,325 $2,061
O03E $2,439 $2,196
O01 $1,992 $1,743
O02 $2,202 $1,920
O03 $2,337 $2,112
O04 $2,568 $2,244
O05 $2,733 $2,277
O06 $2,757 $2,322
O07 $2,778 $2,355

Fort Benning, GA BAH Rates

PaygradeWithWithout
E01 $1,392 $1,146
E02 $1,392 $1,146
E03 $1,392 $1,146
E04 $1,392 $1,146
E05 $1,464 $1,248
E06 $1,746 $1,317
E07 $1,767 $1,389
E08 $1,776 $1,524
E09 $1,794 $1,599
W01 $1,764 $1,380
W02 $1,773 $1,521
W03 $1,785 $1,608
W04 $1,812 $1,743
W05 $1,869 $1,752
O01E $1,770 $1,458
O02E $1,779 $1,587
O03E $1,815 $1,737
O01 $1,506 $1,314
O02 $1,743 $1,440
O03 $1,782 $1,641
O04 $1,884 $1,746
O05 $1,971 $1,755
O06 $1,986 $1,758
O07 $1,998 $1,767

Fort Gordon, GA BAH Rates

PaygradeWithWithout
E01 $1,530 $1,299
E02 $1,530 $1,299
E03 $1,530 $1,299
E04 $1,530 $1,299
E05 $1,599 $1,395
E06 $1,878 $1,458
E07 $1,911 $1,527
E08 $1,947 $1,659
E09 $2,025 $1,734
W01 $1,896 $1,521
W02 $1,929 $1,656
W03 $1,977 $1,743
W04 $2,052 $1,881
W05 $2,145 $1,917
O01E $1,914 $1,593
O02E $1,965 $1,719
O03E $2,061 $1,869
O01 $1,641 $1,455
O02 $1,875 $1,578
O03 $1,974 $1,773
O04 $2,172 $1,902
O05 $2,316 $1,926
O06 $2,334 $1,956
O07 $2,352 $1,983

Fort Stewart, GA BAH Rates

PaygradeWithWithout
E01 $1,716 $1,500
E02 $1,716 $1,500
E03 $1,716 $1,500
E04 $1,716 $1,500
E05 $1,788 $1,584
E06 $1,917 $1,644
E07 $1,959 $1,713
E08 $2,004 $1,821
E09 $2,103 $1,845
W01 $1,932 $1,707
W02 $1,980 $1,818
W03 $2,040 $1,848
W04 $2,133 $1,920
W05 $2,247 $1,968
O01E $1,962 $1,782
O02E $2,025 $1,842
O03E $2,145 $1,905
O01 $1,812 $1,641
O02 $1,914 $1,767
O03 $2,037 $1,866
O04 $2,283 $1,950
O05 $2,460 $1,980
O06 $2,478 $2,022
O07 $2,496 $2,049

Kings Bay & Brunswick, GA BAH Rates

PaygradeWithWithout
E01 $1,782 $1,458
E02 $1,782 $1,458
E03 $1,782 $1,458
E04 $1,782 $1,458
E05 $1,791 $1,659
E06 $1,809 $1,776
E07 $1,947 $1,794
E08 $2,103 $1,806
E09 $2,286 $1,812
W01 $1,821 $1,791
W02 $2,013 $1,803
W03 $2,205 $1,815
W04 $2,319 $1,833
W05 $2,457 $1,980
O01E $1,977 $1,800
O02E $2,175 $1,809
O03E $2,337 $1,821
O01 $1,800 $1,773
O02 $1,806 $1,797
O03 $2,196 $1,818
O04 $2,505 $1,953
O05 $2,718 $2,043
O06 $2,739 $2,190
O07 $2,757 $2,214

Schools in Macon, Georgia

Moody Air Force Base, GA BAH Rates

PaygradeWithWithout
E01 $1,191 $1,092
E02 $1,191 $1,092
E03 $1,191 $1,092
E04 $1,191 $1,092
E05 $1,194 $1,146
E06 $1,431 $1,194
E07 $1,479 $1,215
E08 $1,533 $1,242
E09 $1,653 $1,305
W01 $1,449 $1,212
W02 $1,503 $1,239
W03 $1,569 $1,311
W04 $1,692 $1,440
W05 $1,836 $1,491
O01E $1,485 $1,221
O02E $1,557 $1,293
O03E $1,710 $1,422
O01 $1,224 $1,191
O02 $1,428 $1,218
O03 $1,566 $1,341
O04 $1,887 $1,473
O05 $2,115 $1,587
O06 $2,133 $1,599
O07 $2,148 $1,611

Robins Air Force Base, GA BAH Rates

PaygradeWithWithout
E01 $1,500 $1,215
E02 $1,500 $1,215
E03 $1,500 $1,215
E04 $1,500 $1,215
E05 $1,539 $1,368
E06 $1,632 $1,461
E07 $1,722 $1,506
E08 $1,827 $1,563
E09 $1,977 $1,578
W01 $1,647 $1,503
W02 $1,767 $1,560
W03 $1,893 $1,581
W04 $2,013 $1,647
W05 $2,148 $1,746
O01E $1,740 $1,533
O02E $1,875 $1,575
O03E $2,028 $1,620
O01 $1,557 $1,458
O02 $1,629 $1,527
O03 $1,890 $1,593
O04 $2,193 $1,722
O05 $2,409 $1,806
O06 $2,430 $1,878
O07 $2,445 $1,905

Savannah, GA BAH Rates

PaygradeWithWithout
E01 $1,926 $1,581
E02 $1,926 $1,581
E03 $1,926 $1,581
E04 $1,926 $1,581
E05 $2,022 $1,734
E06 $2,160 $1,830
E07 $2,178 $1,923
E08 $2,187 $2,055
E09 $2,256 $2,082
W01 $2,175 $1,905
W02 $2,184 $2,052
W03 $2,196 $2,088
W04 $2,295 $2,154
W05 $2,433 $2,163
O01E $2,181 $2,016
O02E $2,190 $2,079
O03E $2,310 $2,148
O01 $2,046 $1,824
O02 $2,157 $1,992
O03 $2,193 $2,106
O04 $2,478 $2,157
O05 $2,697 $2,166
O06 $2,721 $2,169
O07 $2,739 $2,190

Military Installations in Georgia

Air Force Bases

    • Dobbins Air Reserve Base – Marietta
    • Moody Air Force Base – near Valdosta
    • Robins Air Force Base – Warner Robins

Army Posts

    • Fort Benning – Columbus
    • Fort Gordon – Augusta
    • Fort Stewart – Hinesville
    • Hunter Army Airfield – Savannah
    • Lawson Army Airfield – Columbus

Marine Corps Bases

    • Albany Marine Corps Logistics Base

Naval Bases

    • King’s Bay Naval Submarine Base – near St. Marys

 

>> Interested in a no PMI, zero down payment possible home loan?  Please go here for a no-obligation, free consultation regarding your VA Loan eligibility.

 

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Virginia BAH Rates 2023 [updated]

2023 BAH Rates for Virginia

Find BAH rates for Virginia broken out by the city, pay grade, and dependency status.  BAH stands for Basic Allowance for Housing.  For Post 911 GI Bill BAH Rates, please use E-5 with Dependents to determine monthly housing allowance.

BAH Rate Calculator 2023

Dependents
 
$0
Per Month
BAH Allowance

Schools in Blacksburg, Virginia

Charlottesville, VA BAH Rates

PaygradeWithWithout
E01 $1,851 $1,461
E02 $1,851 $1,461
E03 $1,851 $1,461
E04 $1,851 $1,461
E05 $1,932 $1,653
E06 $2,220 $1,767
E07 $2,367 $1,848
E08 $2,529 $1,992
E09 $2,694 $2,070
W01 $2,238 $1,836
W02 $2,436 $1,989
W03 $2,631 $2,079
W04 $2,721 $2,253
W05 $2,826 $2,403
O01E $2,394 $1,926
O02E $2,601 $2,055
O03E $2,733 $2,211
O01 $1,974 $1,764
O02 $2,217 $1,905
O03 $2,625 $2,112
O04 $2,859 $2,373
O05 $3,021 $2,469
O06 $3,048 $2,616
O07 $3,072 $2,658

Schools in Charlottesville

Dahlgren & Fort AP Hill BAH Rates

PaygradeWithWithout
E01 $2,004 $1,812
E02 $2,004 $1,812
E03 $2,004 $1,812
E04 $2,004 $1,812
E05 $2,007 $1,929
E06 $2,196 $2,004
E07 $2,256 $2,025
E08 $2,325 $2,043
E09 $2,475 $2,091
W01 $2,214 $2,022
W02 $2,286 $2,040
W03 $2,370 $2,097
W04 $2,520 $2,205
W05 $2,700 $2,271
O01E $2,265 $2,031
O02E $2,355 $2,082
O03E $2,544 $2,187
O01 $2,031 $2,001
O02 $2,193 $2,028
O03 $2,367 $2,121
O04 $2,763 $2,253
O05 $3,045 $2,292
O06 $3,072 $2,352
O07 $3,096 $2,388

Schools in Fairfax, Virginia

Hampton & Newport News, VA BAH Rates

PaygradeWithWithout
E01 $1,830 $1,386
E02 $1,830 $1,386
E03 $1,830 $1,386
E04 $1,830 $1,386
E05 $2,007 $1,551
E06 $2,025 $1,665
E07 $2,046 $1,833
E08 $2,076 $2,016
E09 $2,190 $2,022
W01 $2,040 $1,779
W02 $2,061 $2,013
W03 $2,100 $2,025
W04 $2,232 $2,034
W05 $2,388 $2,052
O01E $2,049 $2,001
O02E $2,091 $2,019
O03E $2,250 $2,031
O01 $2,019 $1,647
O02 $2,022 $1,950
O03 $2,097 $2,028
O04 $2,442 $2,037
O05 $2,691 $2,055
O06 $2,715 $2,082
O07 $2,733 $2,112

Schools in Harrisonburg, Virginia

Lexington, VA BAH Rates

PaygradeWithWithout
E01 $1,218 $924
E02 $1,218 $924
E03 $1,218 $924
E04 $1,218 $924
E05 $1,272 $1,074
E06 $1,602 $1,200
E07 $1,671 $1,254
E08 $1,746 $1,341
E09 $1,869 $1,434
W01 $1,620 $1,218
W02 $1,704 $1,338
W03 $1,797 $1,443
W04 $1,902 $1,617
W05 $2,025 $1,686
O01E $1,683 $1,266
O02E $1,782 $1,416
O03E $1,917 $1,593
O01 $1,317 $1,161
O02 $1,599 $1,257
O03 $1,794 $1,479
O04 $2,067 $1,668
O05 $2,262 $1,713
O06 $2,280 $1,779
O07 $2,298 $1,803

Norfolk & Portsmouth, VA BAH Rates

PaygradeWithWithout
E01 $1,914 $1,500
E02 $1,914 $1,500
E03 $1,914 $1,500
E04 $1,914 $1,500
E05 $2,034 $1,680
E06 $2,178 $1,794
E07 $2,196 $1,911
E08 $2,217 $2,070
E09 $2,316 $2,100
W01 $2,193 $1,884
W02 $2,205 $2,067
W03 $2,235 $2,103
W04 $2,352 $2,175
W05 $2,496 $2,199
O01E $2,199 $2,028
O02E $2,226 $2,094
O03E $2,370 $2,166
O01 $2,061 $1,785
O02 $2,175 $1,995
O03 $2,232 $2,121
O04 $2,544 $2,187
O05 $2,769 $2,202
O06 $2,790 $2,217
O07 $2,811 $2,247

Schools in Norfolk

Quantico & Woodbridge, VA BAH Rates

PaygradeWithWithout
E01 $2,397 $1,875
E02 $2,397 $1,875
E03 $2,397 $1,875
E04 $2,397 $1,875
E05 $2,529 $2,127
E06 $2,661 $2,277
E07 $2,796 $2,403
E08 $2,949 $2,562
E09 $3,150 $2,592
W01 $2,673 $2,361
W02 $2,862 $2,559
W03 $3,048 $2,595
W04 $3,192 $2,688
W05 $3,366 $2,829
O01E $2,826 $2,532
O02E $3,021 $2,583
O03E $3,216 $2,652
O01 $2,550 $2,265
O02 $2,658 $2,487
O03 $3,039 $2,607
O04 $3,426 $2,805
O05 $3,699 $2,889
O06 $3,729 $3,033
O07 $3,759 $3,072

Richmond & Fort Lee, VA BAH Rates

PaygradeWithWithout
E01 $1,839 $1,431
E02 $1,839 $1,431
E03 $1,839 $1,431
E04 $1,839 $1,431
E05 $1,950 $1,614
E06 $1,968 $1,728
E07 $1,986 $1,836
E08 $1,995 $1,959
E09 $2,073 $1,965
W01 $1,983 $1,812
W02 $1,992 $1,956
W03 $2,004 $1,968
W04 $2,115 $1,977
W05 $2,283 $1,983
O01E $1,989 $1,944
O02E $1,998 $1,962
O03E $2,136 $1,974
O01 $1,962 $1,722
O02 $1,965 $1,914
O03 $2,001 $1,971
O04 $2,340 $1,980
O05 $2,607 $1,986
O06 $2,628 $1,989
O07 $2,649 $1,992

Schools in Richmond

Roanoke, VA BAH Rates

PaygradeWithWithout
E01 $1,518 $1,194
E02 $1,518 $1,194
E03 $1,518 $1,194
E04 $1,518 $1,194
E05 $1,608 $1,335
E06 $1,740 $1,425
E07 $1,842 $1,515
E08 $1,959 $1,638
E09 $2,070 $1,665
W01 $1,755 $1,500
W02 $1,893 $1,635
W03 $2,034 $1,671
W04 $2,091 $1,758
W05 $2,157 $1,869
O01E $1,863 $1,602
O02E $2,010 $1,662
O03E $2,097 $1,728
O01 $1,632 $1,419
O02 $1,737 $1,578
O03 $2,031 $1,686
O04 $2,175 $1,842
O05 $2,277 $1,911
O06 $2,295 $2,019
O07 $2,310 $2,046

Warrenton, VA BAH Rates

PaygradeWithWithout
E01 $2,409 $1,980
E02 $2,409 $1,980
E03 $2,409 $1,980
E04 $2,409 $1,980
E05 $2,532 $2,169
E06 $2,784 $2,286
E07 $2,880 $2,406
E08 $2,988 $2,589
E09 $3,189 $2,652
W01 $2,799 $2,376
W02 $2,928 $2,586
W03 $3,057 $2,661
W04 $3,243 $2,802
W05 $3,462 $2,904
O01E $2,898 $2,526
O02E $3,039 $2,640
O03E $3,273 $2,772
O01 $2,571 $2,277
O02 $2,781 $2,493
O03 $3,054 $2,688
O04 $3,540 $2,880
O05 $3,885 $2,943
O06 $3,921 $3,042
O07 $3,951 $3,093

Military Installations in Virginia

Department of Defense

  • The Pentagon – Arlington

Air Force Bases

  • Joint Base Langley-Eustis – Hampton, Newport News
  • Langley Air Force Base – Hampton

Army Posts

  • Fort A.P. Hill – Bowling Green
  • Fort Belvoir – near Alexandria
  • Fort Eustis – Newport News
  • Fort Lee – Petersburg
  • Fort Story – Virginia Beach
  • Joint Base Fort Myer-Henderson Hall – Arlington
  • Joint Base Langley-Eustis – Hampton, Newport News

Coast Guard Bases

  • Coast Guard Atlantic Area – Portsmouth
  • Coast Guard Integrated Support Center Portsmouth
  • Coast Guard Navigation Center – Alexandria
  • Coast Guard Reserve Training Center Yorktown – east of Williamsburg

Marine Corps Bases

National Guard Facilities

  • Fort Pickett Army National Guard Maneuver Training Center – near Burkeville

Naval Bases

  • Dahlgren Naval Surface Warfare Center
  • Little Creek Naval Amphibious Base – near Virginia Beach
  • Norfolk Naval Shipyard – Portsmouth
  • Norfolk Naval Station
  • Oceana Naval Air Station (NAS)- near Virginia Beach
  • Portsmouth Naval Medical Center
  • Yorktown Naval Weapons Station – near Williamsburg

 

>> Interested in a possible home loan with zero down payment?  Please go here for a no-obligation, free consultation regarding your VA Loan eligibility.

 

RELATED:

 

 

Texas BAH Rates 2023 [updated]

Texas Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH Rates) for 2023

If you’re looking for housing allowance for school or plan to PCS to Texas, here are the Texas BAH Rates.  Find BAH Rates for Texas (Basic Allowance for Housing) broken out by the city, pay grade, and dependency status.

For Post-9/11 GI Bill users, you will use the equivalent of an E-5 BAH rate for Texas with dependents.  This will determine your monthly housing allowance.

2023 BAH Rate Calculator

Dependents
 
$0
Per Month
BAH Allowance

Abilene & Dyess AFB, TX BAH Rates

RankWithWithout
E01 $1,191 $894
E02 $1,191 $894
E03 $1,191 $894
E04 $1,191 $894
E05 $1,329 $996
E06 $1,932 $1,449
E07 $1,956 $1,470
E08 $1,965 $1,482
E09 $2,037 $1,632
W01 $1,953 $1,467
W02 $1,962 $1,479
W03 $1,980 $1,650
W04 $2,064 $1,932
W05 $2,163 $1,950
O01E $1,959 $1,476
O02E $1,971 $1,593
O03E $2,073 $1,926
O01 $1,407 $1,056
O02 $1,926 $1,473
O03 $1,977 $1,713
O04 $2,196 $1,938
O05 $2,352 $1,953
O06 $2,373 $1,962
O07 $2,388 $1,989

Austin, TX BAH Rates

RankWithWithout
E01 $2,163 $1,626
E02 $2,163 $1,626
E03 $2,163 $1,626
E04 $2,163 $1,626
E05 $2,385 $1,821
E06 $2,784 $2,088
E07 $2,808 $2,166
E08 $2,817 $2,469
E09 $2,898 $2,583
W01 $2,805 $2,106
W02 $2,814 $2,466
W03 $2,826 $2,595
W04 $2,940 $2,784
W05 $3,111 $2,790
O01E $2,811 $2,379
O02E $2,820 $2,559
O03E $2,961 $2,778
O01 $2,439 $1,932
O02 $2,781 $2,313
O03 $2,823 $2,640
O04 $3,168 $2,787
O05 $3,438 $2,793
O06 $3,468 $2,796
O07 $3,495 $2,823

Schools in Austin, TX

Beaumont, TX BAH Rates

RankWithWithout
E01 $1,326 $996
E02 $1,326 $996
E03 $1,326 $996
E04 $1,326 $996
E05 $1,464 $1,098
E06 $1,803 $1,350
E07 $1,827 $1,371
E08 $1,854 $1,536
E09 $1,965 $1,629
W01 $1,821 $1,368
W02 $1,842 $1,533
W03 $1,875 $1,641
W04 $2,004 $1,806
W05 $2,157 $1,833
O01E $1,830 $1,458
O02E $1,866 $1,611
O03E $2,022 $1,794
O01 $1,512 $1,179
O02 $1,800 $1,419
O03 $1,872 $1,677
O04 $2,208 $1,818
O05 $2,451 $1,839
O06 $2,472 $1,857
O07 $2,487 $1,881

Brownsville, TX BAH Rates

RankWithWithout
E01 $1,380 $1,035
E02 $1,380 $1,035
E03 $1,380 $1,035
E04 $1,380 $1,035
E05 $1,458 $1,194
E06 $1,884 $1,413
E07 $2,076 $1,557
E08 $2,286 $1,716
E09 $2,505 $1,878
W01 $1,905 $1,431
W02 $2,166 $1,626
W03 $2,418 $1,881
W04 $2,541 $1,929
W05 $2,685 $2,124
O01E $2,115 $1,587
O02E $2,382 $1,788
O03E $2,559 $1,920
O01 $1,515 $1,299
O02 $1,881 $1,560
O03 $2,412 $1,884
O04 $2,733 $2,088
O05 $2,958 $2,220
O06 $2,982 $2,403
O07 $3,006 $2,439

College Station, TX BAH Rates

RankWithWithout
E01 $1,281 $1,023
E02 $1,281 $1,023
E03 $1,281 $1,023
E04 $1,281 $1,023
E05 $1,404 $1,101
E06 $1,899 $1,425
E07 $1,950 $1,464
E08 $2,004 $1,506
E09 $2,142 $1,650
W01 $1,920 $1,440
W02 $1,977 $1,503
W03 $2,043 $1,665
W04 $2,184 $1,908
W05 $2,352 $1,962
O01E $1,956 $1,470
O02E $2,031 $1,620
O03E $2,205 $1,893
O01 $1,470 $1,152
O02 $1,893 $1,467
O03 $2,040 $1,719
O04 $2,409 $1,944
O05 $2,673 $2,004
O06 $2,697 $2,025
O07 $2,715 $2,055

Schools in College Station

Corpus Christi, TX BAH Rates

RankWithWithout
E01 $1,512 $1,134
E02 $1,512 $1,134
E03 $1,512 $1,134
E04 $1,512 $1,134
E05 $1,656 $1,272
E06 $2,124 $1,593
E07 $2,160 $1,620
E08 $2,196 $1,755
E09 $2,304 $1,890
W01 $2,145 $1,611
W02 $2,178 $1,752
W03 $2,223 $1,905
W04 $2,340 $2,130
W05 $2,478 $2,166
O01E $2,163 $1,650
O02E $2,211 $1,863
O03E $2,355 $2,118
O01 $1,719 $1,362
O02 $2,121 $1,623
O03 $2,220 $1,956
O04 $2,523 $2,151
O05 $2,742 $2,175
O06 $2,766 $2,205
O07 $2,787 $2,238

Schools in Cypress, Texas

Dallas, TX BAH Rates

RankWithWithout
E01 $2,166 $1,626
E02 $2,166 $1,626
E03 $2,166 $1,626
E04 $2,166 $1,626
E05 $2,418 $1,815
E06 $2,685 $2,013
E07 $2,706 $2,172
E08 $2,715 $2,475
E09 $2,793 $2,547
W01 $2,703 $2,088
W02 $2,712 $2,472
W03 $2,724 $2,556
W04 $2,835 $2,682
W05 $2,997 $2,688
O01E $2,709 $2,412
O02E $2,718 $2,532
O03E $2,856 $2,676
O01 $2,457 $1,911
O02 $2,682 $2,334
O03 $2,721 $2,586
O04 $3,054 $2,685
O05 $3,312 $2,691
O06 $3,342 $2,694
O07 $3,369 $2,721

El Paso, TX BAH Rates

RankWithWithout
E01 $1,437 $1,077
E02 $1,437 $1,077
E03 $1,437 $1,077
E04 $1,437 $1,077
E05 $1,587 $1,197
E06 $1,716 $1,293
E07 $1,758 $1,437
E08 $1,809 $1,617
E09 $1,884 $1,644
W01 $1,731 $1,395
W02 $1,782 $1,614
W03 $1,848 $1,647
W04 $1,905 $1,719
W05 $1,977 $1,770
O01E $1,764 $1,581
O02E $1,833 $1,641
O03E $1,911 $1,704
O01 $1,611 $1,278
O02 $1,713 $1,536
O03 $1,845 $1,665
O04 $1,998 $1,752
O05 $2,106 $1,785
O06 $2,121 $1,830
O07 $2,136 $1,854

Fort Hood, TX BAH Rates

RankWithWithout
E01 $1,284 $1,065
E02 $1,284 $1,065
E03 $1,284 $1,065
E04 $1,284 $1,065
E05 $1,287 $1,200
E06 $1,485 $1,284
E07 $1,650 $1,305
E08 $1,830 $1,374
E09 $1,977 $1,482
W01 $1,503 $1,302
W02 $1,725 $1,323
W03 $1,947 $1,485
W04 $1,995 $1,521
W05 $2,046 $1,689
O01E $1,683 $1,311
O02E $1,914 $1,437
O03E $1,998 $1,500
O01 $1,311 $1,281
O02 $1,482 $1,308
O03 $1,938 $1,488
O04 $2,061 $1,656
O05 $2,142 $1,764
O06 $2,160 $1,932
O07 $2,175 $1,959

Schools in Killeen, TX

Fort Worth, TX BAH Rates

RankWithWithout
E01 $1,875 $1,407
E02 $1,875 $1,407
E03 $1,875 $1,407
E04 $1,875 $1,407
E05 $2,040 $1,587
E06 $2,406 $1,803
E07 $2,427 $1,878
E08 $2,436 $2,118
E09 $2,466 $2,220
W01 $2,424 $1,827
W02 $2,433 $2,115
W03 $2,445 $2,232
W04 $2,490 $2,403
W05 $2,574 $2,409
O01E $2,430 $2,034
O02E $2,439 $2,199
O03E $2,499 $2,397
O01 $2,091 $1,704
O02 $2,403 $1,986
O03 $2,442 $2,271
O04 $2,601 $2,406
O05 $2,733 $2,412
O06 $2,757 $2,415
O07 $2,778 $2,436

Goodfellow AFB, TX BAH Rates

RankWithWithout
E01 $1,224 $918
E02 $1,224 $918
E03 $1,224 $918
E04 $1,224 $918
E05 $1,374 $1,032
E06 $1,593 $1,194
E07 $1,692 $1,269
E08 $1,800 $1,422
E09 $1,905 $1,479
W01 $1,611 $1,209
W02 $1,737 $1,419
W03 $1,869 $1,485
W04 $1,923 $1,614
W05 $1,986 $1,716
O01E $1,710 $1,368
O02E $1,848 $1,467
O03E $1,929 $1,584
O01 $1,407 $1,068
O02 $1,590 $1,323
O03 $1,866 $1,512
O04 $2,004 $1,692
O05 $2,100 $1,755
O06 $2,118 $1,854
O07 $2,130 $1,878

Houston, TX BAH Rates

RankWithWithout
E01 $1,899 $1,425
E02 $1,899 $1,425
E03 $1,899 $1,425
E04 $1,899 $1,425
E05 $2,124 $1,593
E06 $2,448 $1,836
E07 $2,469 $1,911
E08 $2,475 $2,196
E09 $2,589 $2,289
W01 $2,466 $1,851
W02 $2,475 $2,193
W03 $2,490 $2,298
W04 $2,628 $2,448
W05 $2,799 $2,463
O01E $2,472 $2,127
O02E $2,484 $2,265
O03E $2,652 $2,445
O01 $2,169 $1,671
O02 $2,448 $2,052
O03 $2,487 $2,331
O04 $2,856 $2,454
O05 $3,123 $2,466
O06 $3,147 $2,472
O07 $3,171 $2,499

Schools in Houston, TX

Laughlin AFB & Del Rio, TX BAH Rates

RankWithWithout
E01 $1,140 $855
E02 $1,140 $855
E03 $1,140 $855
E04 $1,140 $855
E05 $1,248 $945
E06 $1,539 $1,152
E07 $1,647 $1,236
E08 $1,764 $1,323
E09 $1,902 $1,428
W01 $1,557 $1,170
W02 $1,698 $1,308
W03 $1,839 $1,431
W04 $1,932 $1,563
W05 $2,040 $1,671
O01E $1,665 $1,248
O02E $1,818 $1,374
O03E $1,944 $1,530
O01 $1,290 $1,026
O02 $1,536 $1,239
O03 $1,836 $1,434
O04 $2,076 $1,647
O05 $2,244 $1,716
O06 $2,262 $1,824
O07 $2,277 $1,848

Lubbock, TX BAH Rates

RankWithWithout
E01 $1,281 $978
E02 $1,281 $978
E03 $1,281 $978
E04 $1,281 $978
E05 $1,389 $1,095
E06 $1,740 $1,305
E07 $1,791 $1,344
E08 $1,845 $1,464
E09 $1,959 $1,563
W01 $1,761 $1,323
W02 $1,815 $1,461
W03 $1,881 $1,572
W04 $1,992 $1,749
W05 $2,127 $1,800
O01E $1,797 $1,383
O02E $1,869 $1,542
O03E $2,010 $1,734
O01 $1,437 $1,170
O02 $1,737 $1,356
O03 $1,878 $1,611
O04 $2,172 $1,785
O05 $2,379 $1,818
O06 $2,400 $1,863
O07 $2,415 $1,890

Schools in Lubbock

San Antonio, TX BAH Rates

RankWithWithout
E01 $1,863 $1,398
E02 $1,863 $1,398
E03 $1,863 $1,398
E04 $1,863 $1,398
E05 $2,061 $1,545
E06 $2,079 $1,677
E07 $2,097 $1,866
E08 $2,106 $2,070
E09 $2,151 $2,076
W01 $2,094 $1,803
W02 $2,103 $2,067
W03 $2,115 $2,079
W04 $2,181 $2,088
W05 $2,298 $2,094
O01E $2,100 $2,055
O02E $2,109 $2,073
O03E $2,193 $2,085
O01 $2,073 $1,656
O02 $2,076 $1,995
O03 $2,112 $2,082
O04 $2,334 $2,091
O05 $2,514 $2,097
O06 $2,535 $2,100
O07 $2,553 $2,103

Schools in San Antonio

Waco, TX BAH Rates

RankWithWithout
E01 $1,416 $1,284
E02 $1,416 $1,284
E03 $1,416 $1,284
E04 $1,416 $1,284
E05 $1,548 $1,287
E06 $1,830 $1,371
E07 $1,953 $1,464
E08 $2,088 $1,608
E09 $2,277 $1,707
W01 $1,848 $1,389
W02 $2,010 $1,605
W03 $2,172 $1,710
W04 $2,319 $1,857
W05 $2,490 $1,983
O01E $1,977 $1,542
O02E $2,148 $1,671
O03E $2,340 $1,821
O01 $1,590 $1,290
O02 $1,827 $1,506
O03 $2,169 $1,725
O04 $2,550 $1,956
O05 $2,820 $2,115
O06 $2,844 $2,157
O07 $2,865 $2,190

Wichita Falls & Sheppard AFB, TX

RankWithWithout
E01 $1,134 $852
E02 $1,134 $852
E03 $1,134 $852
E04 $1,134 $852
E05 $1,236 $936
E06 $1,656 $1,242
E07 $1,755 $1,317
E08 $1,857 $1,392
E09 $1,950 $1,464
W01 $1,677 $1,260
W02 $1,800 $1,350
W03 $1,923 $1,467
W04 $1,965 $1,680
W05 $2,010 $1,776
O01E $1,770 $1,329
O02E $1,905 $1,428
O03E $1,968 $1,650
O01 $1,293 $1,023
O02 $1,653 $1,320
O03 $1,920 $1,503
O04 $2,022 $1,752
O05 $2,091 $1,815
O06 $2,109 $1,908
O07 $2,121 $1,935

Military Installations in Texas

Air Force Bases

  • Dyess Air Force Base – Abilene
  • Goodfellow Air Force Base – San Angelo
  • Lackland Air Force Base (Joint Base San Antonio) – San Antonio
  • Laughlin Air Force Base – Johnstone
  • Randolph Air Force Base (Joint Base San Antonio) – Universal City
  • Sheppard Air Force Base – Wichita Falls

Army Posts

  • Biggs Army Airfield – Fort Bliss – El Paso, TX
  • Camp Bullis – San Antonio
  • Corpus Christi Army Depot – Corpus Christi
  • Fort Bliss – El Paso
  • Fort Hood – Killeen
  • Fort Sam Houston (Joint Base San Antonio) – San Antonio
  • Red River Army Depot – southwest of Texarkana

Coast Guard Bases

  • USCG Air Station Houston – Houston
  • USCG Station Galveston – Galveston Island

Naval Bases

  • Corpus Christi Naval Air Station
  • Fort Worth Naval Air Station, Joint Reserve Base
  • Ingleside Naval Station

 

RELATED:

 

 

National Guard & Reserve Education Benefits

Veteran Education Benefits for the National Guard and Reserve

There are two basic ways to serve in uniform; commit to a full-time, active duty service commitment or choose part-time service as a member of the National Guard or Reserve.

Those who choose the Guard or Reserve learn their military benefits–especially education benefits–aren’t as generous as the benefits offered to those who serve full-time. In spite of this, education benefits offered to the Guard and Reserve are valuable and worth pursuing.

Knowing how and when you may qualify for these benefits is an important part of the planning stages of higher education. This guide explains who qualifies and much more.

It is important to point out that for most VA education benefits, those with military discharges characterized as Dishonorable, Other Than Honorable, or Bad Conduct are not eligible for GI Bill benefits unless they have their discharges upgraded by a Military Discharge Review Board. You can learn about the military discharge review/upgrade process at the VA official site.

Editor’s Note: Members of the National Guard and the Reserve are sometimes referred to as serving as a member of a “reserve component”, and when you see that phrase in VA benefits literature or state veteran benefits program official sites, it means members of both the Guard and Reserve.

Post-9/11 GI Bill for Members of the Guard and Reserve

The Post-9/11 GI Bill is the program offered to all new recruits entering full-time military service. It’s also an option for members of the Guard and Reserve who have performed enough full-time duty to qualify. 

What kind of full-time duty? The Department of Veterans Affairs official site describes two different types of active duty service for members of the Guard/Reserve:

  • Active duty (Title 10) – full-time duty, such as a unit deployment during war, This includes time taken to travel to and from such duty;
  • Full-time National Guard duty (Title 32) – full-time duty, such as responding to a national emergency or duties as an Active Guard Reserve member.

Qualifying for the Post-9/11 GI Bill as a Member of the Guard/Reserve

Members of the Guard and Reserve may qualify for the Post 9/11 GI Bill if they meet the VA’s criteria, which includes full-time service under one of the two options listed above, as well as the following:

  • Honorably discharged from active duty for a service-connected disability after serving at least 30 continuous days after September 10, 2001, OR;
  • Having at least 90 days of active service consisting of:
    • Active duty (Title 10 full-time Guard duty) supporting what the VA calls “named contingency operations,” OR;
    • Full-time National Guard duty (Title 32) for the purpose of organizing, administering, recruiting, instructing, or training, OR;
    • Full-time National Guard duty (Title 32) when authorized by the President or the Secretary of Defense during a national emergency.

Members of the Guard and Reserve who qualify for the Post 9/11 GI Bill may apply online using  VA Form 22-1990 or its electronic equivalent. When prospective students complete this form, it will be necessary to have the following documentation ready at application time:

  • Social Security number
  • Direct deposit information
  • Education history
  • Military service history
  • Basic information about the school you want to attend

Learn more: How to Get Your Post 9/11 GI Bill Benefits

The Department of Veterans Affairs typically needs 30 days to process an application; it is best to start as early as possible in case there are delays, paperwork issues, etc.

Students are required to regularly verify enrollment with the VA by text message or by calling the Education Call Center at 1-888-GIBILL-1 (1-888-442-4551).

Transferring Post 9/11 GI Bill Benefits

This is not something handled by a school, but it is a question likely to be asked along the way. Transferring benefits is done via the Department of Defense and not the VA.

Demographically speaking, these types of questions are more likely to come from new or prospective members of the National Guard or Reserve who aren’t fully informed about their benefits yet. Some may be exploring Guard/Reserve options at the same time as college.

The Post 9/11 GI Bill program does allow the transfer of Post 9/11 GI Bill benefits to spouses and school-age “dependent” children (the VA’s terminology, not ours), but this must be applied for while the servicemember is still on active duty. A prospective student who wants to transfer entitlement but is no longer on active duty may not be allowed to do so.

Applying for a transfer means applying for something called a Transfer of Entitlement (TOE) using VA Form 22-1990E. You can apply online, or the student can apply by mail or via a VA regional office.

Once a service member prepares to leave active duty, they can provide a “future effective date” for when the TOE can be used and manage the number of months transferred to the spouse or dependent.

Read more: How to Transfer Post 9/11 GI Bill Benefits to a Spouse or Dependent

Montgomery GI Bill-Selected Reserve (MGIB-SR)

The Montgomery GI Bill is an education benefit that was offered to all new recruits but has since been replaced by the Post-9/11 GI Bill. However, some in the Guard or Reserve may still qualify to use the Montgomery GI Bill Selected Reserve (MGIB-SR) if they choose to do so.

Who qualifies for the MGIB-SR?

Members of the following:

  • Army Reserve
  • Navy Reserve
  • Air Force Reserve
  • Marine Corps Reserve
  • Coast Guard Reserve
  • Army National Guard
  • Air National Guard

Qualifying for the Montgomery GI Bill as a Member of the Guard/Reserve

You may qualify for the Montgomery GI Bill as a member of the Guard/Reserve if at least one of the following is true:

  • You have a 6-year service obligation in the Selected Service OR;
  • You are an officer in the Selected Reserve serving 6 years in addition to your initial service AND;
  • You meet what the VA calls “ other requirements,” which may include finishing initial active duty for training (IADT), and being in good standing in a Selected Reserve Unit.
  • Your obligation must have started after June 30, 1985, or for some types of training after September 30, 1990.
  • You have a 6-year service obligation (you agreed to serve 6 years) in the Selected Reserve, OR;
  • You’re an officer in the Selected Reserve, and you agreed to serve 6 years in addition to your first obligation.

Your military service must have started after June 30, 1985, or for some types of training after September 30, 1990.

All of these must also apply in addition to at least one of the above:

  • You complete your initial active duty for training (IADT), and
  • You get a high school diploma or certificate, such as a High School Equivalency Diploma or GED, before finishing IADT (You cannot use 12 hours toward a college degree to meet this requirement), and
  • You stay in good standing while serving in an active Selected Reserve unit

Qualifying for Military Tuition Assistance as a Member of the Guard/Reserve

In addition to the GI Bill, you may also qualify for Military Tuition Assistance from the Guard/Reserve, though not all branches of service offer the benefit to reserve component members.

To apply for the Montgomery GI Bill, students must first determine if the program they choose accepts it. If so, you can apply online using VA Form 22-1990.

When helping prospective students complete this form, it will be necessary for the student to have the following documentation ready for the application:

  • Social Security number
  • Bank account direct deposit information
  • Education history
  • Military service history
  • Basic information about the school or training facility you want to attend or are attending now, where applicable.

Students who use Montgomery GI Bill funds to pay for school are required to verify their enrollment with the VA on a regular basis. You can verify your enrollment using the VA Web Automated Verification system or by phone at 877-823-2378.

Read More: GI Bill Facts and Fiction

Montgomery GI Bill Active Duty (MGIB-AD)

Members of the Guard or Reserve who have not served on active duty don’t have access to this option. However, those who join the Guard or Reserve as “prior service” members who were formerly on active duty often do.

Troops qualify for the MGIB-AD program by opting into it when in boot camp or at their first duty station. Those who choose this program have their pay reduced by $100 a month for 12 months, with the federal government providing a much larger contribution.

Multiple categories qualify for the Montgomery GI Bill.

Category I

    • The applicant has a high school diploma, GED, or 12 hours of college credit, and
    • Entered active duty after June 30, 1985, and;
    • The applicant chose to contribute $100 a month for the first 12 months of service toward the Montgomery GI Bill program.
    • Applicant must have served continuously for 24-36 months, depending on the agreement or;
    • Served four years if you entered the Selected Reserve within a year of leaving active duty

Category II

    • The applicant has a high school diploma, GED, or 12 hours of college credit, and;
    • Started active duty before January 1, 1977 (or before January 2, 1978, under a delayed enlistment program contracted before January 1, 1977), and;
    • The applicant served between October 19, 1984, and June 30, 1985, and stayed on active duty through June 30, 1988 (or through June 30, 1987, if you entered the Selected Reserve within 1 year of leaving active duty and served 4 years), and;
    • The applicant had one day or more of GI Bill entitlement left under the Vietnam Era GI Bill (Chapter 34) as of December 31, 1989

Category III

    • High school diploma, GED, or 12 hours of college credit, and;
    • The applicant does not qualify for MGIB under categories I or II, and;
    • Contributed to the Montgomery GI Bill ($1,200) before retirement or separation.
    • The applicant must have served on active duty on September 30, 1990, and involuntarily separated after February 2, 1991, or;
    • Involuntarily separated on or after November 30, 1993, or;
    • Voluntarily separated under the Voluntary Separation Incentive program or;
    • Voluntarily separated under the Special Separation Benefit program.

Category IV

    • High school diploma, GED, or 12 hours of college credit, and;
    • The applicant made a $1,200 contribution toward the GI Bill.
    • Applicant served on active duty on October 9, 1996, had money left in a VEAP account on that date, and chose MGIB before October 9, 1997, or;
    • Started full-time National Guard duty under title 32, USC, between July 1, 1985, and November 28, 1989, and chose MGIB between October 9, 1996, and July 9, 1997.

Prospective students eligible to apply for Montgomery GI Bill benefits may apply online with the Department of Veterans Affairs using VA Form 22-1990.

There is something known as an MGIB-AD buy-up program where the service member opts into an additional $600 in personal contributions to the program. Doing so qualifies the student for more GI Bill money–an additional $5600 in additional GI Bill benefits. The $600 buy-up option is not offered with the Post 9/11 GI Bill.

Furthermore, the Montgomery GI Bill does not feature an option to transfer the benefit to a dependent spouse or school-age child. The Post-9/11 GI Bill features many more options than the Montgomery version, including a monthly housing stipend and the ability to transfer the benefit in exchange for a longer military service commitment.

Guard and Reserve Tuition Assistance (TA)

Similar to active-duty tuition assistance programs, the Guard and Reserve also have TA options that can help pay for college. These options vary greatly depending on the branch of military service and other factors. Get service-specific information for Guard and Reserve Tuition Assistance Programs.

State-Funded Programs for Members of the Guard/Reserve

State-level Departments of Veterans Affairs or Divisions of Veterans Affairs may include state-administered veteran education benefits programs.

These programs may be offered to veterans currently serving service members, spouses, and dependents. However, these state programs are not standardized, do not offer identical options from state to state, and may restrict certain benefits to those with VA-rated service-connected medical issues.

Budgetary constraints may limit these state programs, may lose or regain funding, or may be modified by state laws or program guideline changes. Learn more about a specific state’s options in our guide to military education benefits by state.

You can also find your state’s Division or Department of Veterans Affairs using a map-based locator provided on the National Association of State Directors Of Veterans Affairs official site.

A Word on the Reserve Educational Assistance Program (REAP)

REAP was a VA education program offering up to 36 months of education benefits for qualifying members of the Selected Reserves, Individual Ready Reserve (IRR), and National Guard called or ordered to active service in response to a war or national Emergency.

The National Defense Authorization Act of 2016 ended the VA REAP program in 2015. Why do we include it here? Because some remained eligible for REAP benefits until November 25, 2019, while others are no longer eligible for REAP benefits.

As the VA official site points out, there is no “window of opportunity” to use REAP benefits, and eligibility typically ends when you leave the Selected Reserve.

Some veterans may be able to use REAP up to 10 years after the date of their entitlement, which is why information on this program persists online–it is possible some members of the Guard or Reserve may have remaining entitlement under REAP.

If that applies to you, it’s best to contact the Department of Veterans Affairs to get advice and help to apply for such remaining entitlement–while the VA may not approve new REAP payments, you may qualify for the Post 9/11 GI Bill. Contact the VA directly at 1-800-827-1000 to get help with REAP-related issues.

In the eyes of the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Post-9/11 GI Bill “…in many ways has replaced REAP because it also provides educational assistance benefits for Reserve and National Guard members called to active duty on or after September 11, 2001, and in many cases provides a greater benefit than REAP.”

 

 

 

Federal Law Enforcement Jobs at the Department of Justice

Federal Law Enforcement Jobs at the Justice Department

Given that leadership, integrity, teamwork, and dedication are all traits shared by military personnel; it seems a no-brainer that law enforcement is one of the most common civilian career paths taken by former military service members.

Depending on your branch of service, you likely already have many of the basic skills needed in law enforcement such as weapons handling, crowd management, risk assessment, and the use-of-force or rules of engagement. But those skills are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to Federal law enforcement.

Why Federal Law Enforcement?

Nearly every agency and department within the Federal Government actively seek to hire Veterans for law enforcement roles. This is especially true of the Department of Justice law enforcement agencies like the FBI, U.S. Marshals, and the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BoP).

Special Hiring Rules for Veterans

Many of the educational and experience requirements may be waived for military veteran candidates. In addition, as a veteran, you are given priority for many federal jobs, especially in the case of federal law enforcement given that your training, experience and learned skills translate well into the law enforcement field.

If you are eligible, you can also apply for Veterans’ Preference Points. To learn more about Veterans’ Preference, click here.

Visit FedsHireVets.gov for more information on benefits for veterans and service members.

FBI Career Opportunities

The FBI’s priority is to investigate a wide range of crimes like terrorism, espionage, cybercrimes, corruption, organized crime, street gangs, child predators, and serial killers.

As a veteran you may apply for any of the jobs at the FBI, from Special Agent to any of the professional positions, like forensics, accounting, information technology/cybersecurity, surveillance, intelligence analysis, and more. There are two main career paths within the FBI. The best known is Operations & Intelligence, which is most often seen in movies and TV shows. See details on these FBI career opportunities.

U.S. Marshal Career Opportunities

The U.S. Marshals Service (USMS) was founded in 1789 making it the oldest federal law enforcement agency in the U.S.. The USMS work often goes unseen by the general public, except in films and TV. The Marshals main role is centered on supporting the federal justice system.

The USMS central role is as the enforcement arm of the federal courts. U.S. Marshals serve in 94 federal judicial districts. Deputy Marshals and Criminal Investigators are the foundation of the USMS; their roles include capturing federal fugitives, securing the federal court system, operating the Witness Security Program (WitSec), and transporting prisoners. See details on these career opportunities.

Federal Bureau of Prisons Career Opportunities

The Federal Bureau of Prisons’ (BoP) mission is to protect our communities by operating our federal prisons and ensuring the prisons are safe, humane, cost-efficient, and appropriately secure.

There are four main career areas within the Federal Bureau of Prisons – Inmate Custody & Programs, Health Services, Careers in Operational, Careers in Support & Administration. This means that as a veteran you can choose from several career paths, including several that do not deal directly with inmates. See details on these career opportunities.

If you are interested in finding a Federal job in law enforcement, you can start at the Dept. of Justice Veteran Recruitment website.

 

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10 Step Guide to Going to College for Military & Veterans

Your military career is coming to an end, you can see your ETS date approaching and have been thinking about what you want to do after this chapter ends. Or, you are a military spouse, your kids are all school age now, and you want to start focusing on your own career.

What about going back to school? Or maybe you never had the chance to start in the first place?

Going to College: 10-Step Guide

If this is something you have thought about, here is a 10-step guide for going to college:

Step 1: Should you go back to school?

The first question you have to answer is if you should go back to school in the first place. Ask yourself why you would want to go to school, what you would do, and what you going back to school would look like for your family.

  • Will you need to find childcare for the kids?
  • How long will it take you to finish?
  • What would your end goal be?

Once you figure out that you actually do want to go back to school, you can move on to step 2.

RELATED: Why Stop at an Associate’s Degree?

Step 2: Where should you go to school?

You now need to decide where you are going to go to school. Here are some factors that can go into deciding where you should go to school:

  • Where you live
  • If you want to go to school online or not
  • What your military installation offers
  • What program do you want to go into
  • What the class schedules are like
  • What is the rating of the schools you can choose from are
  • If you can move to a new city or not
  • Are they one of the military-friendly colleges?

The best thing to do is look at all of your options, make a list of pros and cons, talk to your spouse if you have one, and come up with the best plan for your education.

 

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Step 3: Time to apply for college

Applications for colleges can seem a bit overwhelming. The most important thing is to know exactly what you need to send in and when the application deadlines are.

Make a list of everything you need to do, from filling out paperwork to writing an essay if that is required. Each school will have its own specific dates and never assume you know what they are based on past experience.

If you do have questions about the application process you can always talk to someone in the admissions department at the school you would like to attend.

In today’s world, you should be able to complete your applications online, making the process a little easier than applying for college used to be.

Step 4: Send in those transcripts

As a part of the application process, you need to figure out if you will have to send in any transcripts. If you have taken college classes in the past, this will be a must.

Colleges will also most likely want to see your high school transcripts. Most schools will want them sent directly from the school, not from you. Sending in your transcripts will let you know what you still need to take and what will apply to the new program you are going towards.

For example, if you want to get into an RN nursing program, but you have an AA degree from another college or university, you can probably transfer some of those classes and not have to take as many prerequisites as you if you didn’t have that educational experience in your background.

In order to send your transcripts, you will need to contact your previous schools. Some will have an online form that you can fill out or will have you go through a 3rd party to get those sent. There could also be schools that are more old-fashioned when it comes to your transcripts and you might have to send in a letter requesting them. Talk to the school you want to attend to find out the exact address they need to be sent to and make sure to follow up so you know that they have received them.

If you are a service member, you can also submit your Joint Services Transcript (JST) or your Community College of the Air Force Transcript (CCAF) which will show your military service and training allowing you to receive college credit based on your time and what you learned by serving in the military. These transcripts are official records and more than 2,300 colleges and universities will accept them.

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Step 5: FAFSA

FAFSA is federal financial aid for students. No matter who you are, it would be a good idea to apply. You can use FAFSA with the GI Bill and you can use FAFSA with MYCAA. With FAFSA, the money you receive can be in the form of grants, scholarships, or unsubsidized or subsidized loans. What you receive will depend on the need-based and non-need-based aspects of your application. You can apply for FAFSA on their website.

Step 6: Using the GI Bill and MYCAA

The GI Bill has been helping veterans in some form, since 1944. Today, with the Post 9/11 GI Bill, veterans can have their education paid for, as well as receive money for books, and even a GI Bill Housing Benefit. Service members can transfer their GI Bill to their spouse or even their child and allow them to use this benefit. There is also still the option of using the Montgomery GI Bill which is a slightly different educational benefit.

MYCAA is for military spouses that qualify for this benefit. Spouses can receive $2,000 a year, for two years for certain educational programs and degrees.

In order to qualify a spouse will need to be married to an active duty service member in the ranks of:

  • E-1 through E-5
  • W-1 through W-2
  • O-1 through O-2

They will also need to have completed high school and have a spouse on Title 10 orders. National Guard and Reservist spouses can qualify if their spouse goes on active duty.

READ MORE:

 

Find Scholarships for Military, Veterans, and Their Families

 

Step 7: Now that you are accepted to college

After you send in your application, you might have to wait a bit before you hear that you are accepted to the college you want to go to. Once you hear from all the colleges you have applied for,  you will need to make your decision.

There might be one school that you wanted to go to above others, and in that case, you don’t have to decide anything. You just need to let the school know you do plan to attend there. If you got into more than one school that you would like to go to, you will have to make a decision.

Again, you should go back over the pros and cons of each school, what they can offer you, and what would be best for your own personal situation as well as educational goals.

Step 8: Know your dates

After you have decided on the school you are going to attend, make sure you know the dates for everything you will need to do moving forward. You will have to turn in certain paperwork and there will be things you have to do when it comes to financial aid. You could have an orientation you have to attend, you might need to meet with an advisor, and you should figure out what you have to do in order to sign up for your classes on time.

Having a separate calendar just for school deadlines and dates would be a good idea. Staying organized is a must. You don’t want to miss out on something or miss an important deadline.

Step 9: You need supplies

Before your first day of class, you need to make sure you have all the supplies you need to have a good school year. The number one supply you are going to have to buy is your textbooks. Most schools let you search for your textbooks based on what classes you are taking.

If you have the Post 9/11 GI Bill you will receive $1,000 per year for supplies. You can use this money for textbooks or other supplies you might need. You can also find cheaper textbooks using different sources such as searching comparable websites or buying used ones.

You might need a new computer for your schooling as well as basic supplies such as folders, notebooks, pens, and pencils. Also, make sure that you are aware of any extra expenses that can come from different classes or programs and budget for those purchases as well.

Step 10: First day of school

 Eventually, it will be time to start your first day of school. If you are attending classes in person, going on a trial run before your first day would be a good idea. That way, you can figure out parking, and where your classes will be. You don’t want to be wandering around campus, unsure of where to go, on the first day of school.

Most of all, enjoy your journey. Whether you are going to college for the first time or going back to get an advanced degree. Going back to school can be stressful, but being organized will help you go a long way.

If you have an education center on post, that can be a good place to start if you are unsure of what you want to do in the future. There are many options for service members, veterans, and spouses who are looking for ways to further their education and career goals.

 

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DoD MOU: What You Need to Know

As a service member, you want to find a veteran or military friendly school to go to. You want to make sure they have your best interests as a service member in mind when you are going to their school. How do you determine this? How do you know if your school is one of the veteran and military friendly colleges? One way is the DoD MOU.

What is the DoD MOU?

The DoD Voluntary Education Partnership Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is between the DoD Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness and educational institutions. If a school wants to receive DoD military tuition assistance, they must agree to the Voluntary Education Partnership Memorandum of Understanding.

How many schools and institutions are on the participant’s list?

There are 2,772 main institutions and 11,149 total additional locations. You can see what these are on this list on the DoD MOU website.

TA Decide

Another way to find out information about educational institutions is using TA Decide. This is an information and comparison tool to help TA participants make informed choices on schools and educational programs.

The TA Decide program is fueled by more than ten recognized and trusted data sources from across the departments of Defense, Education, and Veterans Affairs. It is also uniquely tailored to each TA participant.

Within TA Decide you can search your school directly, or search by state/territory, accreditation type, school type, learning method, programs, or degree level. You can also compare different schools that are in the database.

DoD Voluntary Education Partnership MOU Eligibility

To be eligible, an educational institution must:

  • Be accredited by a national or regional accrediting body that is recognized by the Department of Education (ED.) They need to conduct programs that are only from among those offered or authorized by the main administrative and academic office in accordance with standard procedures for authorization of degree programs by the educational institution.
  • Be state-approved for the use of veterans education benefits, such as the Post-9/11 GI Bill.
  • Be certified to participate in the federal student aid programs through the Department of Education under Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965. This certification can be provisional if the educational institution maintains eligibility to participate in the Federal Direct Loan Program.
  • Must comply with state authorization requirements that are consistent with regulations issued by ED, which includes, 34 C.F.R. 600.9. The educational institutions must meet all of the state laws as they relate to distance education.
  • Must comply with 34 C.F.R.600.9 (a) and (b). The DoD also recognizes any additional rules ED provides for delayed implementation.
  • Title IV participants must obtain an Office of Post-secondary Education Identification (OPE ID) number that is issued by the Department of Education. This is to help identify schools that have PPA (Program Participation Agreements) so that students are eligible to participate in the Federal Student Financial Assistance programs under the Title IV regulations.

What information does the TA Decide tool show us?

You can gain a lot of good and in-depth information when you are using the TA Decide tool. Here is some information about what’s in the tool:

School Details

There will be school information such as the school’s address, website, source of accreditation, accreditation type, school type, DoD MOU point of contact, and number of DoD TA participants.

Federal Beneficiaries and Funds

Here you will find the number of those using TA and the costs, the number using the Post 9/11 GI Bill and the costs, as well as information about those getting Federal Student Aid.

Programs and Offerings

This section will have the learning methods available, information on Service members Opportunity Colleges, types of degrees, and subjects you can receive the degrees in.

Cost of Attendance

Here you will find information on tuition rates, fees, books and supplies, and room and board.

DoD Tuition Assistance (TA) Information

In this section, you will find more information about Tuition Assistance including how many courses are funded by TA and the school’s TA course completion rate.

Department of Education Information

Here you will find Department of Education information such as ED composite scores and information from College Navigator Institution Data such as enrollment numbers.

Complaint Information

This area will have any complaints that have been filed by service members and their families about their educational experience at that school.

School Eligibility

Under this category, you will see if the school has signed the DoD Memorandum of Understanding (MOU,) if they have agreed on the Principles of Excellence, if they have the Yellow Ribbon program and if they have agreed with the 8 Keys to Veterans Success.

The Comparison Tool

When you compare more than one school, you can get a sense of how similar or different they are. You can find out how much TA pays per course, compared to the DoD average. You can also see what your chances are of passing your course, also compared to the DoD average. There is also information about the percentage of military graduates, and how long it takes to graduate.

As a service member, you will want to find a school that has what you are looking for, has signed the DoD MOU, and that will be friendly to veterans and members of the military. Using TA Decide and checking to see if your school is on the participant’s list is a great way to find that school or to know that the school you are attending qualifies.

 

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Navy Federal Member Benefits & Perks

Member Benefits for Navy Federal Credit Union

As a military member, you can find different benefits out there for you and your family because of your military service. When it comes to banking, you have a lot of choices, but Navy Federal Credit Union is made for service members and provide a lot of benefits from banking to buying a new car. Here is a little bit about Navy Federal Credit Union benefits and perks that may be available to you.

List of NFCU Benefits

  • Unofficially, NFCU stands for Navy Federal Credit Union and was originally incorporated in 1933 as the Navy Department Employees’ Credit Union of the District of Columbia.
  • They have gone through many changes over the years and were only open to Navy personnel until 2008 when they opened up to the entire Department of Defense, to include members of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force as well as civilian personnel within the Department of Defense. In 2013, they were also opened to the Coast Guard.
  • Navy Federal has 7.5 million members and is the largest natural member or retail credit union in the United States.
  • They are open to all service members, to include the national guard and reserves, DOD Officer candidates, veterans, retirees, annuitants, DOD civilians, as well as family members. These include grandparents, parents, spouses, siblings, children, grandchildren, and household members.
  • They offer a lot of similar services that USAA does, including banking, special offers, and loans. However, compared to USAA, they tend to have more generous loan terms as well as more physical bank locations.
  • They also offer perks and discounts, military pay advances, and easy direct deposit.
  • You can receive your military paycheck a day early.

RELATED: Navy Federal Pay Dates

  • Since they are a credit union, as a member you will become part owner and have a say in the future of the company. They will also pay out dividends.
  • They offer free checking accounts, and they also refund ATM fees up to $20 per statement period on their free active duty checking accounts. Their Free Active Duty Checking account was made for active duty life which is a huge plus.

As you can see, there are many Navy Federal Credit Union benefits and perks just for joining.  When choosing where to bank, keep these things in mind as you are trying to decide where it would be best to go.

As far as deciding if Navy Federal Credit Union is right for you, that will depend on what you are looking for in a financial institution, what types of products you plan to use, and who you trust to keep your money safe. Just know that they will offer you and your family amazing benefits if you decide to go with them.

 

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Hazlewood Act – What is it, Qualifying, & Applying for Texas Veterans

The state of Texas has their own way to help those who have served in the military pay for college, it’s called the Hazlewood Act. This act was named for the Texas senator, Grady Hazlewood. He led the passage of many amendments to the act in 1944 to help veterans. It dates back to 1929 to help nurses and veterans without other benefits and has evolved from there.

Texas’ Hazlewood Act

Here is some information about the Hazlewood Act and how it can help veterans and possibly their families pay for college.

What is the Hazlewood Act?

If you qualify for the Hazlewood Act, you will be exempt from paying your tuition and most fees, up to 150 semester credit hours.

You will need to be enrolled in classes at a public institution of higher education in the state of Texas.

You also can not use this for property deposits, student service fees, books, supplies, and living expenses.

  • The Hazlewood Act is not based on financial need.
  • You can use the Hazlewood Act for undergraduate and graduate school, including law school. You can also use it for distance learning if the classes you are taking receive formula funding and you are taking these classes through a Public Texas institution.
  • As far as continuing education classes without formula funding go, institutions are not required to offer Hazlewood Act benefits to veterans enrolled in them. However, the college or university may choose to permit this option.

Who Qualifies for the Hazlewood Act?

Veterans

  • In order to qualify, at the time you started your active duty military service, you must have designated Texas as your home of record, entered the service in Texas, or had been a Texas resident.
  • You also need to have had an honorable discharge or separation or a general discharge under honorable conditions as indicated on the your certificate of release or discharge from active duty.
  • You need to have served at least 181 days of active duty service, not including training.
  • You can use your Federal VA Education benefits as long as they are not the Post-9/11 GI Bill (chapter 33) or Vocational Rehabilitation Education program benefits (chapter 31) as well as any other benefits designed only for payment of tuition and fees. However, if you are receiving Federal VA Education benefits for payment of tuition and fees, you may receive both benefits if the Federal VA Education benefit amount does not equal or exceed the Hazlewood exemption value. If this is the case, you may receive a Hazlewood exemption that equals the difference between the total tuition and fees and the federal benefits.
  • Basically, you would not be able to use the Post-9/11 GI Bill with the Hazlewood Act unless you do not qualify for the full amount of the Post-9/11 GI Bill.
  • You will need to currently reside in Texas.
  • You can not be in default on a student loan made or guaranteed by the state of Texas.
  • You will need to be enrolled in classes for which the college or university receives tax support unless the college’s governing board has ruled to allow veterans to receive the benefit while taking non-funded courses.
  • You also will need to meet the GPA requirements of the institution’s satisfactory academic progress policy. This will have to be in a degree or certificate program, as determined by the institution’s financial aid policy. Also, as an undergraduate student, you can not be considered to have attempted an excessive amount of credit hours.

Children of Veterans under the Legacy Act

Veterans who are eligible for the Hazlewood Act may assign or transfer unused hours of exemption eligibility to a child under certain circumstances.

  • The child must be classified by the institution as a resident of Texas.
  • They must be the biological child, stepchild, adopted child, or claimed as a dependent in the current or previous year.
  • They must be 25 years old or younger on the 1st day of the semester or term for when the exemption is claimed. There are some cases when they can receive an extension due to a qualifying illness or debilitating condition.
  • They must also meet the GPA requirements of the institutions/ satisfactory academic progress as listed above in the veteran’s section.

Spouses and Dependent children

  • Spouses and dependent children of active duty, reserve, and Texas National Guard who died in the line of duty, or as a result of an injury or illness directly related to military service, or who are missing in action, or became disabled for purposes of employability as a result of a service-related injury or illness are able to receive an 150 credit hour exemption with the Hazlewood Act as well.
  • A spouse must be the spouse of a veteran, who at the time of entry into the military, was classified by the institution as a Texas resident, had a designated Texas Home of Record, or entered the service in Texas. The same goes for a dependent child.
  • The same rules about Federal Veterans Education benefits that apply to veterans also apply to the spouse and dependent child.
  • Spouses and dependent children also need to be classified by the institution as a Texas resident.
  • The GPA requirements listed for the veteran also apply for the spouse and dependent child except in the case that the spouse or child is a spouse or child of a service member who is missing in action, killed in action, or is a service-connected deceased veteran.

Miscellaneous Hazlewood Act Information

  • The institution that the veteran, spouse or child attends exempts the cost of tuition and fees. No money will change hands.
  • The governing board of each institution shall report to the Texas Veterans Commission. They will give them any information relating to each individual receiving an exemption from tuition and fees through the Hazlewood Act.
  • Remember that there are strict rules for what makes you eligible as far as being a Texas resident goes. It simply isn’t enough that you lived in Texas once, that you have done so in the past, or that you want to do so in the future.

How Do You Apply for the Hazlewood Act?

You would need to register with the Hazlewood Act online database to get started.

As you can see, the Hazlewood Act can save you money on your schooling and allow you to fulfill your dreams. If you qualify, you should make sure to check out this fantastic benefit for you and possibly your children.

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National Guard & Reserve Tuition Assistance

National Guard Tuition Assistance and Reserve Tuition Assistance

If you are serving in the National Guard or Reserves, you might be wondering if there is a National Guard Tuition Assistance (TA) program or Reserve Tuition Assistance program available to you.

There are Tuition Assistance programs for all five branches of the military, with their own service-specific criteria. There are also TA programs for the Army National Guard, Air National Guard, and some Reserves branches.

Army National Guard Tuition Assistance

  • If you are serving in the Army National Guard you can receive FTA, Federal Tuition Assistance.
  • You can qualify for FTA if you are currently serving in the National Guard, and as of August 5th, 2018, have completed AIT. Previously, you needed to wait a year after AIT to qualify.
  • FTA will fund up to $250 per semester hour, up to 16 semester hours each fiscal year.
  • The lifetime limits would be 130 for undergraduate semester hours, 39 for graduate semester hours, and 21 for certificate or diploma semester hours.
  • The college or university that you go to must be regionally or nationally accredited and a GoArmyEd participant.
  • Federal Tuition Assistance will pay for one credential at each level, which includes getting a certificate/diploma, associate’s degree, bachelor’s degree, master’s degree or graduate level certificate. They will not pay for doctorate degrees.
  • You also may not use FTA to achieve a lower level or lateral level degree or diploma. The purpose is to help you move forward in your education.
  • FTA is for tuition only, not for fees or other expenses outside of the official degree plan.
  • You will need to contact your state’s education services office to find out if you are eligible for Federal Tuition Assistance.
  • If you are eligible for FTA, you would start your application process by creating a GoArmyEd You will need to have this submitted and approved through the GoArmyEd site prior to the course start date.
  • Your FTA request needs to be course by course, not just a blanket request for all of your classes.
  • GoArmyEd will notify you whether your FTA is approved, if not they will advise you on what to do next.

Air National Guard

You can receive TA benefits through serving in the Air National Guard. Make sure to check out your state’s specific educational benefits to know what you would qualify for. You can also work towards your associate’s degree through the Community College of the Air Force.

Tuition Assistance for the Reserves

The branches that offer Reserves TA do usually stay within these guidelines:

  • Up to 100% coverage for tuition, up to $250 per semester hour, or $166 per quarter hour. Up to $4,500 per fiscal year
  • Must be a reservist in good standing
  • Need to declare an educational goal by the 9th credit hour for the USAFR and by the 15th for the USAR
  • Must work towards an educational goal higher than what you already have.
  • Need to be able to complete your course under your current term of service or reenlist (for enlisted and warrant officers,) or have at least four years left of remaining service from the date of your course completion (for commissioned officers.)

The Navy Reserves and the Marine Corps Reserves do not have a tuition assistance program at this time. However, if you get called to active duty, you will fall under the Federal Tuition Assistance program of your active duty counterparts during your activation period.

The Army Reserve Tuition Assistance

For those going for a bachelor’s degree, the Reserve Tuition Assistance program will pay for 75% of tuition costs, up to $250 per semester hour, $166 per credit hour, with the $4,500 annual fiscal cap. To apply, you would need to submit your Tuition Assistance application online through GoArmyEd.

The Air Force Reserve Tuition Assistance

For undergraduates, they offer TA at the DOD guidelines. For master’s degrees, funding is limited to 75% of those guidelines. If you are interested in an associate’s degree and going through the Community College of the Air Force, you will be exempt from the progressive education level requirement. You can apply for TA by going to the Air Force Reserve Portal website.

The Coast Guard Reserve Tuition Assistance

In order to receive TA benefits through the Coast Guard, you will need to be a reservist on long term active duty orders of over 180 days. Back to back tours will not count. The Coast Guard also has an annual fiscal year cap of $2,250 which is lower than other branches.

If you are serving in the National Guard or the Reserves, make sure to find out if you qualify for Tuition Assistance. If you do, make sure to apply in a timely manner in order to receive TA for your education.

 

TUITION ASSISTANCE:

 

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National Guard Pay vs. Army Reserves Pay

National Guard Pay and Reserve Pay

If you are thinking about joining the National Guard or the Reserves, you might be wondering how National Guard pay or Reserve pay works.

Serving in the National Guard and Reserves can be quite different than serving in the active duty military. You have your monthly drills, your annual training, and anything else the military calls you to do. You also work a civilian job, and the military is only a small part of your paycheck.

As an active duty soldier, you know you can receive base pay, BAH (Basic Allowance for Housing), and other types of payments and allowances.

How do things work for the National Guard and Reserves? How about if you deploy or train for more than a weekend? Will you still receive BAH if you are gone for three weeks?

National Guard Pay and Reserve Pay

Your pay as a National Guard or Reservist is determined by your rank, job, and time in service.

You will always get paid when you train. When you work for the military, you will receive some type of military pay.

What about drill pay and weekend drills?

  • Weekend drills can be anywhere from 1-4 days long, depending on what is going on, what is needed and even the budget. Usually, you can count on training on Saturday and Sunday with a possible Friday or Monday as well. They will be at your local armory or another location. If you live near a military installation, you might even go there for training.
  • Each year, you can figure out how much you will get paid during your drill weekends by checking out the military pay charts here. For example, in 2018, an E-5 with 8+ years would make $104.19 for 1 drill, $416.76 for 4 drills. An O-7 with 16+ years would make $392.73 for 1 drill, $1,570.92 for 4 drills.
  • You need to know that 1 drill period is 4 hours. On a typical weekend, you would work 4 drill periods. So that E-5 would earn $416.76 for a regular, two day drill weekend.
  • You are not given any BAH for a drill weekend.
  • You should receive your pay for your drill weekend, about 10 days after the weekend is over, give or take.

What about Annual Training (AT)?

  • AT is annual training and happens once a year, for about two or three weeks. During this time, your base pay would be the same as your active duty counterpart with the same rank and time in service. This will, of course, be prorated for the time that you are away on training.
  • If you’re gone for less than 30 days, you will receive what is called Basic Allowance for Housing Reserve Component/Transient, or BAH II. This is not the same as BAH, what an active duty service member would receive.
  • BAH II pays less than what BAH I would pay. It is also not based on your location but instead on rank, if you have dependents or not, and on the national average for housing. The E-5 with dependents would earn $948.30, the 0-7 with dependents would earn $2050.80. This number is also prorated. If you are gone for three weeks, you will receive three weeks worth of BAH II, not the full amount.
  • You can pull up these rates on the military pay charts here as well.
  • If you happen to be gone for more than 30 days, you would then receive BAH I. This is a change as it used to be that you had to be gone 140 days to qualify.

What happens when I deploy?

  • When you deploy, you are being activated and will receive pay as if you were on active duty. This will include pays such as BAH, Family Separation Pay, Hostile Fire/Imminent Danger Pay, Hardship Duty Pay, Hazardous Duty Pay, Foreign Language Proficiency Pay, BAS (Basic Allowance for Subsistence,) and all of your pay while deployed will be tax-exempt.
  • Of course, what you receive when you deploy will depend on where you are going, how long you are there, and what you qualify for.

What about TRICARE?

  • As far as TRICARE goes, you will have to pay a monthly fee unless you are activated to serve on active duty. When that happens, you can qualify for the same TRICARE that your active duty counterpart does.
  • If you are not activated, you would need to sign up for TRICARE Reserve Select, and the cost would be $221.38 per month for the service member and their family, $46.09 for just the service member. While you do have to pay for this, the cost is very affordable and less than what you would probably pay through your civilian employer.

Anything else I need to know about National Guard and Reserves Pay?

There are also over 60 special and incentive military pays that you may or may not qualify for. If you do extra training, you can also earn more money from doing so.

Remember, every time you are working for the military, you will receive a military paycheck. If you are trying to learn more about how much money you would make as a National Guard or Reserve service member, this should give you an idea of what to expect.

 

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Mississippi Veterans Benefits & Disabled Veterans Benefits

State of Mississippi Veteran Benefits

The following are state-level Mississippi veterans’ benefits programs for education, housing, employment, nursing home care, and burial benefits.

Education Benefits for Mississippi Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the state of Mississippi.

Mississippi State Educational Assistance Program (SEAP)

SEAP is a state-level military education benefit for service members not receiving Federal Tuition Assistance. There is an exception for this for the state’s Free Tuition Program schools. The amount of SEAP funds per semester is capped at $4,500.00 per academic year at $250 per credit hour.

To qualify, students must meet the following requirements::

  • Applicant is a member of the Mississippi National Guard
  • The applicant has completed basic training
  • Registered as a voter in Mississippi
  • Full-time student in Mississippi
  • The benefit is for an undergraduate program

This benefit can be used in conjunction with federal tuition assistance or GI Bill for classes at these schools:

  • University of Southern Mississippi
  • Mississippi University for Women
  • University of Mississippi
  • Mississippi State University
  • Jackson State University
  • Alcorn State University

Students have 10 years to use this benefit after the first payment is made. Those who have used the benefit previously must provide a copy of their last semester grades.

Mississippi Educational Assistance

Qualifying children of service members reported as MIA or who are prisoners of war can apply for an eight-semester scholarship. This covers tuition but NOT books, food, or supplies. The State of Missouri VA official site provides minimal information about this military education benefit program; learn more by contacting the Mississippi VA.

Mississippi Resident Tuition Rates for Nonresident Service Members:

Veterans, spouses, college-age dependent children, nonresident military members stationed in the state on active duty, and nonresident Mississippi National Guard are considered residents, for tuition purposes at Mississippi state-supported schools.

Be advised that according to the state’s official site, “members that are reassigned outside of Mississippi or leave the Mississippi National Guard, are no longer eligible.

Dependents keep their residency status when:

  • The student completes their senior year of high school in Mississippi and enrolls in a Mississippi institution of higher learning;
  • The student is “enrolled in and remains continuously enrolled in” a Mississippi college;
  • Dependents of a Service member stationed overseas after a duty assignment in Mississippi.

Find colleges in Mississippi with our School Finder.  Use the filters to sort schools by state.

Housing Benefits for Mississippi Veterans

Mississippi Veterans Home Purchase Board

The Veterans Home Purchase Board provides low interest mortgages loans up to $250,000. Eligible veterans and unmarried surviving spouses can use this option to buy an existing single family home or to build a new home.

To qualify:

  • The veteran must be a Mississippi resident before entering the military OR;
  • Be a resident for two consecutive years before applying for the loan.
  • The veteran must have a Certificate of Eligibility for Home Loan Guaranty from the VA
  • Must have an Honorable discharge

Contact the Veterans Home Purchase Board of Mississippi to learn more or to apply.

Mississippi Veteran Tax Benefits

Mississippi Tax Exemptions for Military Pay

Military pay is exempt from Mississippi state income tax when pay is for duty in a designated combat zone, and the first $15,000 earned by Mississippi Guard and Reserve members for:

  • Inactive duty training
  • Active duty training
  • State active duty (emergency duty)

According to Army.mil, “All other military pay” is taxed in Mississippi, but as we explain below, military retirement pay is the exception.

Mississippi State Income Tax Exemptions for Military Retirement Pay

In general, military retirement income may be exempt from Mississippi income tax if the recipient has met the retirement plan requirements. The state does not tax military disability retirement income including:

  • Disability compensation and pension payments for disabilities
  • Grants for specially adapted homes
  • Grants for adapted motor vehicles
  • Benefits under a dependent-care assistance program

Tax laws are subject to change year to year. Consult a tax professional to learn what the current year’s tax laws may allow.

Homestead Property Tax Exemption for Disabled Veterans

Honorably discharged veterans with a 100% service-connected disability and their surviving spouses may qualify for an exemption on all property taxes on the assessed value of their primary residence. homestead property. Surviving Spouses of eligible Veterans can also receive the tax exemption. This information is subject to change–check with the Mississippi VA for the current status of this tax benefit for disabled veterans.

Nursing Home Benefits for Mississippi Veterans

The State of Mississippi operates four Veterans Nursing Homes:

  • Jackson
  • Oxford
  • Collins
  • Kosciusko

To qualify, applicants must meet Mississippi residency requirements, have qualifying military service, and no Dishonorable discharge. Spouses of current State Veteran Home residents may also qualify.

Pre-need arrangements may be possible, be advised that admission requirements also include a recent medical exam (within 30 days of admission to the facility) that shows the applicant:

  • Does not have a communicable disease.
  • Does not require specialized care
  • Does not have “traits which may prove dangerous to themselves, other residents and employees” according to the official site.

Applicants are encouraged to apply for VA benefits as part of the preparation for admission.

Burial Benefits For Mississippi Veterans

The State of Mississippi operates two veteran cemeteries; one located in Newton and the other in Kilmichael. The state official site provides minimal details about eligibility and other requirements, pre-need arrangements are encouraged. To qualify in general for burial you must have any military discharge other than Dishonorable. Services include:

  • Opening and closing of the gravesite
  • Grave or niche
  • Grave liner
  • Headstones or markers
  • Perpetual care

Contact the cemetery directly for pre-need arrangements.

Employment Benefits for Mississippi Veterans

The State of Mississippi offers veteran preference in hiring for competitive state jobs. This preference is for “fully qualified” veterans five preference points over other applicants for initial hires, as well as for promotions. Qualifying disabled veterans are given an “additional 10 preference points”.

To qualify:

  • Must have served on active duty 90 days or more during a period of war OR;
  • The applicant served less than 90 days, discharged due to a service-connected injury;
  • Applicants with at least 30% or more service-connected disability rating from the VA
  • Applicants who received the Purple Heart

For more information regarding Mississippi veterans’ benefits, please visit the Mississippi VA official site.

Related state military and veteran information:

State Veterans’ Benefits – By State

Mississippi BAH Rates

Yellow Ribbon Schools

Minnesota Veterans Benefits & Disabled Veterans Benefits

Minnesota State Veterans Benefits

The following are the Minnesota veterans’ benefits programs for education, taxes, employment, nursing home care and burial benefits.

Education Benefits for Minnesota Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided at the state level.

Minnesota GI Bill

The Minnesota GI Bill is a state-level program for qualifying Minnesota veterans, currently serving military, National Guard, and Reservists who served after September 11, 2001.

Military spouses and school-age dependents may also qualify. There is a maximum benefit cap of $10 thousand. This is not a program associated with the federal-level GI Bill, it does not affect your eligibility for the federal-level GI Bill, and you may be able to use some benefits concurrently.

This program is different from the Federal GI Bill (Montgomery, Post 9-11 GI Bill, Veterans Education Assistance Program, Dependents Education Assistance Program, or Vocational Rehabilitation. To qualify you must meet one of the following categories:

  • Applicant is a veteran who is serving or has served honorably in any branch of the United States armed forces at any time, or;
  • Applicant has served honorably for a total of five credible years or more cumulatively as a member of the Minnesota National Guard or any other active or reserve component of the United States armed forces, and any part of that service occurred on or after September 11, 2001, or;
  • Applicant is a surviving spouse or child of a person who has served in the military at any time on, and who has died or has a 100% VA-rate permanent and total disability as a result of military service. Applicant must also be eligible under the Fry Scholarship or Chapter 35 benefits.

Full-time undergraduate or graduate students may be eligible to receive up to $3,000 per academic year and this state-level education benefit is capped at  $10,000 per person. Different rates may apply for those seeking apprenticeships or on-the-job training.

Surviving Spouse & Dependent Education Benefit

The Surviving Spouse and Dependent Education benefit is offered to qualifying surviving spouses and dependents, including adopted and step-children. To be approved for this Minnesota state veteran education benefit, the veteran spouse or parent must have died while on active duty, or as a result of a service-connected condition. To qualify:

  • The veteran must have been a resident of Minnesota when they entered the military, OR;
  • The veteran must have been a resident of Minnesota for at least six months prior to passing away due to a service-connected disability.
  • Applicants must be Minnesota residents.
  • Spouses cannot be remarried.

This benefit can be used at state-supported schools. Under this program, students attend “free of tuition until he/she obtains a bachelor’s degree” according to the official site. An additional stipend for books and fees may also be available.

> Find VA-approved colleges and universities in Minnesota with our School Finder.

Minnesota State Tuition Reimbursement (STR)

This program is offered to qualifying members of the Minnesota National Guard. You must apply for federal tuition assistance before you apply for state-level assistance, and you must remain a member of the Minnesota National Guard for the duration of your educational program, with certain exceptions possible (see below).

According to Army.mil, STR reimburses Minnesota National Guard Service members “up to 100% of the tuition cost at an accredited educational institution.

The lifetime maximum STR benefit is 208 quarter or 144 Semester credits” with separate lifetime benefit caps on graduate and undergraduate rates. Undergrads get up to 100% of the undergraduate rate, while grad students may qualify for up to 75% of the rate for their school.

STR may be accessible years after separation if the applicant meets the following requirements:

  • Honorably discharged from the Minnesota National Guard;
  • Served on federal active duty or federally funded state active duty after September 11, 2001
  • STR has been extended for eight years after discharge for those separated or discharged due to a service-connected medical issue.

Veteran Education Assistance

Veteran Education Assistance is a program offering a one-time grant ($750 in 2023) to qualifying veterans who have used “all of their GI Bill benefits to assist with completing a bachelor’s degree”.

This grant is typically paid to the school but may be sent to the student instead “upon verification that tuition has been paid” according to Army.mil. State citizenship is required and you must supply proof that you have used all other forms of federal student aid. You can apply for this benefit through the Minnesota Department of Veterans Affairs.

Tax Benefits for Minnesota Veterans

The State of Minnesota does not tax military pay for active duty service. It also does not tax military retirement pay, or military disability retirement pay. You may also qualify for tax credits if you served in a combat zone. You may also have extended tax filing deadlines for serving overseas in general.

Minnesota State Tax Credit for Past Military Service

If you are a veteran with an adjusted gross income below the current year’s threshold (less than $37,500 in 2022, amounts subject to change) you may qualify for a non-refundable tax credit up to $750. You cannot claim this tax break if you already claim a deduction for military retirement pay.

To claim this credit you must submit a Minnesota Department of Revenue, Schedule M1C, Other Nonrefundable Credits.

Minnesota State Taxes For Nonresident Military Spouses:

Non-resident military spouses are exempt from paying state taxes on their wages if the service member is stationed in Minnesota on military orders, the spouse has a different state of residence, and the spouse is in the state, “only to be with their Service member Spouse”.

State tax laws are subject to change each year, consult your local tax assessor’s office or a tax professional to help you claim such benefits.

Minnesota Market Value Exclusion For Disabled Veterans, Primary Family Caregivers and Surviving Spouses

This program reduces the “market value” of primary residences, which can help lower property taxes. There are two options:

  • $150,000 exclusion for vets with a VA-rated 70% service-connected disability or higher, and for “Primary Family Caregivers” for a veteran with such a disability.
  • $300,000 exclusion for veterans with a 100% permanent and total, service-connected disability, surviving spouses receiving Dependency Indemnity Compensation (DIC), and primary family caregivers for 100% disabled veterans.

To qualify for this option, surviving spouses should apply within two years of the death of the veteran. Homes qualify for this exemption if they are owned by December 1st, and you must apply at a County Assessor’s office by December 31st to qualify for taxes payable in the next year.

Nursing Home Benefits For Minnesota Veterans

The State of Minnesota operates Veterans Homes in a variety of locations including:

  • Fergus Falls
  • Montevideo
  • Preston
  • Hastings
  • Luverne
  • Minneapolis
  • Silver Bay

These facilities offer domiciliary care, rehab services, skilled nursing care, special care units for dementia and Alzheimer’s. Admissions requirements include being a resident of the state, having an Honorable discharge, and a demonstration of medical need.

When applying, the State of Minnesota requests the following to be submitted with your application:

  • A copy of the veteran’s Armed Forces Discharge Forms such as DD Form 214 or equivalent
  • Marriage certificate
  • Any applicable Power of Attorney for Health Care/Finances; Health Care Directive or Legal Guardianship/Conservatorship

There is a single application form that can be used to apply for any of the homes within the state.

The state advises that waiting lists may apply. According to the official site, “…the Minnesota Veterans Home maintains an active and inactive waiting list. The active waiting list is for potential Residents who are currently seeking placement and meet clinical criteria” with the inactive list offered to those who do not currently need placement but may in the future.

Burial Benefits For Minnesota Veterans

The State of Minnesota operates four veteran cemeteries, located in:

  • Little Falls
  • Preston
  • Duluth
  • Redwood Falls

Minnesota offers burial benefits to, according to the official site, “all Veterans discharged from active military service under conditions other than dishonorable.” Also eligible? “Their spouses, minor children, and under certain conditions, unmarried adult children are also eligible for burial.” Qualifying spouses may be buried “even if they predecease the Veteran”.  Reservists and National Guard members may also qualify.

Services provided include but may not be limited to:

  • Gravesite or columbarium niche
  • Grave liner
  • Headstone/niche cover
  • Perpetual care

There is no cost for the burial of a veteran, all others may incur some costs, typically below $1,000. Pre-need registration is encouraged, but you may not be able to reserve a physical plot or niche until the time of need.

Employment Benefits for Minnesota Veterans

Minnesota Veterans State Hiring Preference

According to the State of Minnesota official site, the Veterans Preference Act (VPA) offers qualifying veterans “a limited preference over non-veterans in hiring and promotion for most Minnesota public employment positions” and such preference may also be extended to qualifying spouses.

A 10-point “veteran’s credit” is added to the open examination rating for a “Non-disabled Veteran”, with 15 points added to scores of veterans with “50% or more permanent service-connected disability”. These credits do not apply if the veteran does not score a passing grade on the exam. Some disabled veterans may qualify for direct appointment to state jobs, typically those with VA disability ratings at 30% or higher.

For more information regarding Minnesota veterans’ benefits, please visit the Minnesota Department of Veterans Services official site.

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Michigan Veterans Benefits

Michigan Veteran Benefits

The following are the Michigan veterans’ benefits programs for education, employment, nursing home care and taxes.

Education Benefits for Michigan Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the state of Michigan.

Michigan Children of Veterans Tuition Grant

The grant provides undergraduate tuition assistance for the college-age children of veterans who are permanently and totally disabled, or who died as a result of military service. The grants are offered with caps per academic year:

  • Full-time students: up to a maximum of $2,800 per academic year.
  • Three-quarter time students: up to $2,100 per academic year.
  • Half-time students: up to $1,400 or an amount equal to all of the student’s eligible tuition in that academic year, whichever is less.

To qualify, the veteran must meet program requirements:

  • The veteran must have died while serving in wartime OR;
  • The veteran must have died or was totally and permanently disabled as a result of a service-connected illness or injury as determined by the VA, OR;
  • Have been totally and permanently disabled as a result of a service-connected illness or injury prior to death and has now died; or,
  • Be listed as Missing in Action (MIA) in a foreign country as determined by the U.S. government.

Students must be enrolled at least half-time and must be state residents for one year before applying. Other requirements include that the student bebe a U.S. citizen, permanent resident, or approved refugee. They must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.25 and cannot be in default on a Federal student loan. You must submit a FAFSA form in order to apply for this education benefit. Apply via MichiganStudentAid.gov.

RELATED: Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) for Military Spouses

Michigan National Guard State Tuition Assistance Program (STAP)

The Michigan National Guard State Tuition Assistance Program offers tuition assistance to qualifying members of the Michigan National Guard attending “any public or private college, university, vocational school, technical school or trade school located in Michigan” according to the official site.

The amount of tuition assistance may vary depending on the nature of study:

  • Training Programs – up to $6000
  • Certificate Programs – up to $6000
  • Master’s Degree – up to $6000
  • Associate Degree – up to $14,400
  • Baccalaureate Degree – up to $14,400

To qualify:

  • Must be “active” in the National Guard
  • Must not be absent without leave
  • Must not be “under UCMJ charges”
  • Must meet any additional National Guard requirements

There are lifetime limits for this military benefit. The limit for undergraduate work is $86,000, and the limit for graduate studies is $25,000. These numbers were applicable in 2023, check with the state for the latest numbers and requirements.

RELATED: National Guard Tuition Assistance

Find VA-Approved Schools in Michigan: Get Started

Tax Benefits for Michigan Veterans

Income Tax Benefits for Michigan Veterans

The State of Michigan does not charge income taxes on military retirement pay, military disability retirement pay, or active duty pay.

Michigan Veteran, Service Member, and Surviving Spouse Homestead Property Tax Credit:

 Service members, veterans, and qualifying surviving spouses may apply for a property tax credit on Michigan-based primary residences up to $1,500.

To qualify:

  • The applicant must have been a Michigan resident for six months during the tax year, and;
  • The veteran must have a service-connected disability rating OR;
  • The applicant is a surviving spouse, OR;
  • The service member is on active duty, OR;
  • The veteran or surviving spouse is eligible for military retirement pay.

Other categories may apply. Apply at your local tax assessor’s office or contact a tax professional to help you claim the current year’s tax break where applicable.

Michigan Disabled Veteran Homestead Property Tax Exemption

Some veterans and surviving spouses may qualify for a 100% property tax exemption on primary residences only. To qualify, the applicant must be a Michigan resident with an Honorable discharge, and:

  • Must have a permanent and total VA service-connected disability rating;
  • Must receive financial assistance from the VA for specially adapted housing;
  • Must be VA-rated as individually unemployable.

Apply for this tax exemption at your local assessor’s office.

Nursing Home Benefits for Michigan Veterans

The State of Michigan operates the Grand Rapids Homes for Veterans, Veterans Homes in Chesterfield Township, and the D.J. Jacobetti Homes for Veterans. Services include short-term and long-term care, memory care, rehab, and therapy.

Entry is on a space-available basis, and certain other requirements may apply.

To qualify:

  • Applicant must be an honorably discharged veteran
  • Must be eligible for VA healthcare or financial assistance for long-term nursing care
  • Michigan residency is not a requirement

Dependents may qualify for care if the veteran spouse is eligible or was eligible at the time of death. Dependents are defined as surviving spouses, former spouses, and Gold Star parents.

To apply you will need the following documentation:

  • Military discharge document (DD-214 or equivalent)
  • Copies of Medicare cards
  • Copies of health insurance ID cards
  • A copy of a recent physical
  • Copies of the last three years of federal income tax forms
  • Verification of income and assets
  • Any applicable powers of attorney

Burial Benefits For Michigan Veterans

The State of Michigan, unlike many other states in the Union, does not at press time operate a state veteran’s cemetery. Proposals to build one surfaced in 2022, but at the time of this writing, no active state-level veteran cemetery exists.

There are two national veteran cemeteries in the state that still offer burial services; Fort Custer National Cemetery in Augusta, and Great Lakes National Cemetery in Holly. Contact the Department of Veterans Affairs or the individual cemetery to learn more about application procedures, pre-need planning, and interment options.

Employment Benefits for Michigan Veterans

Michigan State Employment Veterans’ Hiring Preference:

Michigan offers veteran preference points for Michigan civil service positions. Veterans and spouses may be awarded these points if they are otherwise qualified; this preference is for initial hires only and does not apply to promotions or subsequent hiring. Five preference points are are awarded to veterans and surviving spouses, with 10 points possible for:

  • Disabled veterans
  • Spouses of disabled veterans with a VA disability rating 50% or greater
  • Surviving spouses with a child under 18
  • Surviving spouses with a disabled child

To qualify for hiring preference, the veteran must have served on active duty for 90 or more days and received an honorable discharge. Veterans must not be eligible for military retirement pay.

To qualify as a disabled Veteran, applicants must have a service-connected disability rating from the VA.

Other Michigan Veterans’ Benefits

The Michigan Veterans Trust Fund (MVTF)

The MVTF provides emergency grants to Michigan veterans and family members to help them manage a financial crisis. These grants may be applied for through the MVTF county committee serving the veteran’s county of residence.

To be eligible, the veteran must be a Michigan resident, honorably discharged with 180 days of service during a period of war, 180 days of active duty with an Armed Forces or the Navy/Marine Corps Expeditionary Medal, or less than 180 days of wartime service due to disability.

In 2021 the program was modified to include peacetime-era veterans 65 years and older.The MVTF’s 65+ Peacetime Program helps veterans who served in a peacetime era, have at least 180 days of service, and were discharged under honorable conditions.

Michigan Military Family Relief Fund

The Michigan Military Family Relief Fund Act created a program offering grants to qualifying family members of those in the Michigan Guard or Reserve called to active duty as part of the response to 9/11.

These grants are meant for housing, utilities, medical services, food, clothes, and other needs; this is a need-based grant and financial documentation may be required to apply. Applications should be submitted to a Michigan Family Assistance Center.

For more information regarding Michigan veterans’ benefits, please see the Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency official site.

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Massachusetts Veterans & Disabled Veterans Benefits

The following are Commonwealth of Massachusetts veterans’ benefits programs for education, employment, nursing home benefits, and burial benefits.

Massachusetts Veterans’ Benefits Programs

Education Benefits for Massachusetts’ Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

> Find colleges and universities in Massachusetts with our School Finder.

Massachusetts State Military Tuition Waivers

The Massachusetts Department of Veterans Services official site has, at press time, a section of its official site dedicated to Massachusetts state veteran education benefits, which says that “tuition and/or fee waivers are available to veterans and members of the Massachusetts National Guard” for “all state schools, colleges and universities.”

These waivers may be for the entire amount or may function as a supplemental payment depending on circumstances.

To claim this benefit, you are required to work with the college you wish to apply to; vets and members of the Guard and Reserve are advised to “contact the Veterans’ Representative at the state college/university for eligibility requirements and to apply.” Qualifying veterans are approved for this benefit on a space-available basis.

Massachusetts Tuition and Fee Waivers for Guard Members

The Massachusetts National Guard Education Assistance Program offers a 100% tuition and fee waiver for qualifying members of the Massachusetts National Guard soldier who want to attend a state college, university, or community college program.

Service members must remain “in good standing with their unit” while using this Massachusetts military education benefit. Service members may qualify for up to 130 semester hours of assistance.

> Find colleges and universities in Massachusetts with our School Finder.

Tax Benefits for Massachusetts’ Veterans

Massachusetts State Income Tax Breaks For Veterans

The State of Massachusetts does not tax combat zone pay, military retirement pay, or military disability retirement pay.

Massachusetts Property Tax Exemption

Veterans, spouses, surviving spouses, and Gold Star Parents may be eligible for property tax exemptions in Massachusetts. Tax breaks may be offered to those with VA-rated service-connected disabilities at 10% or better, and the amount of these property tax exemptions will vary depending on the applicant.

To qualify, the following general criteria must apply:

  • The applicant is a resident of Massachusetts
  • The veteran received an honorable discharge
  • Applicant must occupy the property as the primary residence
  • Applicant must have lived in Massachusetts for at least six months before military service OR;
  • The applicant lived in Massachusetts for five consecutive years before filing for a property tax exemption

Contact your local tax assessor’s office to learn how to apply.

Massachusetts Disabled Veteran Fee and Tax Exemptions

  • Vehicle Registration Fee and Sales Tax: Disabled veterans may qualify for an exemption of the registration fee and sales tax for one passenger vehicle. The vehicle must be owned by the veteran and cannot be used for commercial purposes.
  • Massachusetts Disabled Veteran Driver’s Licence Fee– Disabled veterans do not pay driver’s license fees when approved for Disabled Veteran plates.
  • Excise Tax– Disabled veterans do not need to pay an excise tax for one passenger vehicle or a pick-up truck owned by the veteran and used for non-commercial purposes. A condition of this tax exemption is that you must be approved for DV plates regardless of whether you choose to use them or not.

Nursing Home Benefits for Massachusetts’ Veterans

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts operates Soldiers’ Homes in Holyoke and in Chelsea. In spite of the name, veterans from all branches of military service are welcome if they qualify. Admissions requirements include, but may not be limited to:

  • Serving for at least 90 consecutive days
  • At least one day of duty must be wartime service;
  • Honorable discharge

Nursing home options include residential care, social work services, and long-term care. A waiting list may apply; contact the facility in advance to learn what requirements may apply to be placed on the list.

Burial Benefits For Massachusetts Veterans

Massachusettes operates two state veteran cemeteries, one located in Agawam and one in Winchendon. These cemeteries are open to eligible veterans and dependents; qualifying veterans can be buried at no cost, and spouses and dependents can be buried for a nominal fee.

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts provides minimal information about requirements, pre-need arrangements, or other issues. Contact the Massachussettes Department of Veterans Services for more information on burial options in the state.

Employment Benefits for Massachusetts’ Veterans

Hiring Preference for Veterans

Qualifying veterans and family members are offered preference points for Civil Service examinations. Those who score 70 points or above on an open exam for Massachusetts civil service jobs including police and firefighting “receive absolute Veterans’ preference and are immediately placed at the head of the eligibility list” according to Army.mil.

The preference ranking is as follows:

  • Disabled Veterans
  • All other Veterans
  • Spouses and single parents of a Veteran who died as a result of military service.

For certain positions, there may be no exam. In such cases, the veteran or family member must submit an application and required documentation showing proof of military service.

Other State Benefits for Massachusetts Veterans

Veteran Annuity Payment

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the Massachusetts Department of Veterans’ Services offer qualifying surviving family members an annual annuity ($2000 in 2022, amounts subject to change year-to-year). This is also offered to “100% service-connected disabled veterans and to the parents and unmarried spouses of those veterans who gave their lives in the service of their country during wartime” according to the official site.

Veterans must have an honorable discharge, meet minimum time-in-service requirements, and the veteran must be a resident of Massachusetts at the time of application.

To qualify as a parent or spouse, the death of the veteran must be service-connected, the applicant must live in Massachusetts, and surviving spouses must not be remarried.

Military Service Bonuses

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts offers cash bonuses to veterans who were Massachusetts residents when they entered military service. Veterans may qualify for a one-time bonus for military service in World War Two, the Korean War, Vietnam, or the Persian Gulf War. Bonus amounts vary depending on the nature of military duty, the conflict, and other variables. Bonus amounts typically range from $100 to $1000.

For more information regarding Massachusetts veterans’ benefits, please see the Massachusetts Department of Veteran Services.

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Maryland Veteran Benefits & Disabled Veteran Benefits

The following are Maryland state-level veteran benefits programs for education, taxes, nursing home care, and burial. You can also learn about veterans’ benefits in other states.

Education Benefits for Maryland Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ education benefits programs provided by the state of Maryland.

Maryland State National Guard Education Benefits

The State of Maryland offers qualifying National Guard members a tuition waiver at state-supported colleges. According to Army.mil, courses “held at Maryland National Guard locations” are offered with tuition waivers of up to 50%.

To qualify, Maryland National Guard Service members must have a two-year military service obligation remaining from the course start date. This benefit may be used along with other education benefits including the GI Bill.

A similar program known as Maryland STAR offers to reimburse Maryland National Guard Service members up to 50% of tuition and related fees at “all Maryland State supported Colleges, Universities, some private institutions, and trade schools” according to Army.mil.

Veterans of the Afghanistan and Iraq Conflicts (VAIC) Scholarship Program

The Maryland VAIC Scholarship Program offers financial assistance to those who served in Afghanistan and Iraq and to qualifying dependents of these service members. This option is for full or part-time study but it cannot be used at the University of Maryland Global Campus or the University of Maryland, Baltimore.

The scholarship covers 50% of the yearly tuition, fees, and lodging with maximum amounts applicable. These amounts are subject to change year to year, but in 2022, there were listed as:

  • On campus: up to $7,735
  • With parents: up to $4,650
  • Off-campus: up to $5,220

According to Army.mil, scholarship award amounts (which may include state and/or VA educational benefits) may not exceed the lesser of the total cost of attendance or $28,000.

State of Maryland Memorial Scholarship Programs

There are two memorial scholarship programs offered in Maryland. The Edward T. and Mary A. Conroy Memorial Scholarship, and the Jean B. Cryor Memorial Scholarship Program, offer tuition and “other educational expenses” to qualifying veterans and family members who want to attend public universities in the state.

These scholarships are typically limited to the actual amount of tuition and mandatory fees per year.

To qualify, veterans must have served on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces and must not have a Dishonorable discharge. State residency is a requirement in typical cases as well as meeting one of the requirements below:

  • Child, stepchild or unremarried Surviving Spouse of a Service member who died while serving on active duty.
  • Child, stepchild or Spouse of a Veteran who has 100% service-connected disability.
  • Child, stepchild or unremarried Surviving Spouse of anyone who died as a result of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.
  • A veteran who has a service-connected disability of 25% or greater and has used all VA educational benefits or is no longer eligible for them.
  • A veteran who was a prisoner of war or was declared missing in action during the Vietnam War.
  • The applicant is a child or stepchild of a POW or someone declared MIA.

This scholarship may be automatically renewed each year as long as the student continues to meet program requirements.

Find colleges in Maryland with our School Finder.  Use the filters to sort schools by state.

Tax Benefits for Maryland Veterans

Military Retirement Pay Exemptions

Qualifying veterans and/or spouses may claim a state tax exemption on $5,000 of military retirement pay, “with an increase to the first $15,000 for individuals who are at least 55 years old on the last day of the taxable year” according to the state of Maryland.

Retirement income qualifies if it was the result of:

  • Induction into the U.S. Armed forces under the Selective Training and Service Act of 1940 “or a subsequent Act of similar nature”
  • Membership in a reserve component
  • Membership in an active component
  • Membership in the Maryland National Guard

Federal disability retirement pay is not taxable under Maryland state law.

Property Tax Exemption

Veterans with a permanent and total service-connected disability rated 100% by the Veterans Administration may qualify for a 100% state property tax exemption on their primary residence. Unmarried surviving spouses may also be eligible.

Maryland Military Spouse Residency Relief Act:

Qualifying spouses of nonresident military members are classified as non-residents for state tax purposes.

This means military spouses are not required to pay Maryland state taxes for employment as long as they continue to meet state requirements and file a revised Maryland Employee’s withholding Exemption Certificate Form MW507 and an Exemption from Maryland Withholding Tax for a Qualified Civilian Spouse of a U. S. Armed Forces Service Member, Form MW507M.

Nursing Home Benefits for Maryland Veterans

The State of Maryland operates Charlotte Hall Veterans’ Home, which has been operating since 1985. The facility offers services including, but not limited to:

  • Assisted living
  • Skilled nursing program
  • Memory care

To qualify for admission, the veteran must have served on full-time active duty and must not have a Dishonorable discharge. Spouses may also qualify.

Other admissions criteria include:

  • Reservists who meet the legal residence requirements.
  • Non-veteran spouses of “eligible veterans to be admitted to Charlotte Hall.”
  • Maryland residents, at least 62 years of age or if under age 62, rated as disabled by either the Social Security Administration or the US Department of Veterans Affairs.

Burial Benefits For Maryland Veterans

The State of Maryland operates five veterans’ cemeteries:

  • Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery
  • Crownsville Veterans Cemetery
  • Eastern Shore Veterans Cemetery
  • Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery
  • Rocky Gap Veterans Cemetery

Admission requirements for these cemeteries are identical to those for burial in a VA cemetery. Eligibility criteria for both veterans and dependents is found at the National Cemetery Administration. State residency is also a requirement for admission.

Pre-need planning is permitted but you may not be allowed to reserve a physical grave site or internment niche. According to the official site, eligible veterans receive a burial plot, a grave liner, headstone, and interment services at no expense.

Employment Benefits for Maryland Veterans

Maryland State Hiring Preference for Veterans

A veteran may receive between 5 and 10 points of credit for state employment examinations as an eligible veteran, a qualifying surviving spouse, the spouse of a veteran with a service-connected disability, or a former prisoner of war. Some may qualify for added credit depending on circumstances. Applicants must otherwise meet job requirements for this consideration.

Maryland Veteran CDL Skills Test Waiver

The State of Maryland may waive the driver skills test required for Class A and Class B Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) for recently discharged service members who meet the following:

  • 2 years of experience driving vehicles as part of their job preceding their discharge from the military.
  • Must have a good driving record
  • A Commanding Officer’s certification is required for the type of vehicle operated professionally
  • The applicant must pass a CDL knowledge test

The waiver only applies to CDL License Classes A and B.

State of Maryland Occupational and Professional Licensing For Veterans And Military Spouses

Some occupational and professional licenses can be expedited for qualifying recently discharged veterans and spouses of currently serving military members. Members of the Guard and Reserve may also qualify.

Applicants with a professional license from another state may apply for expedited licenses that could be received within 60 days. Applicants must meet the following requirements:

  • Received an honorable discharge from an active or reserve component of the U.S. Armed Forces.
  • Active duty Service member and spouse assigned to a duty station in Maryland.
  • Spouse or Surviving Spouse of a Veteran or Service member currently in the U.S. Armed Forces.

For more information regarding Maryland veterans’ benefits, please visit the Maryland Department of Veterans Affairs

Related state military and veteran information:

State Veterans’ Benefits – By State

Maryland BAH Rates

Yellow Ribbon Schools

US Marine Corps Tuition Assistance: What You Need to Know

While serving in the Marine Corps, you might find yourself wanting to go to school. With the USMC Tuition Assistance program, you can receive money for some or all of your classes depending on the degree you want to get.

USMC Tuition Assistance

Each branch offers Tuition Assistance (TA), with their own service-specific criteria. Here is what you need to know about Tuition Assistance in the Marine Corps.

RELATED: Marine Corps Education Programs

Who can use Tuition Assistance in the Marine Corps?

  • Marine Corps Tuition Assistance is available for all active duty and active reserve marines.
  • Officers, both active duty, and reserve must have two years of service obligation remaining to apply for Tuition Assistance.
  • Reservists on a set of active duty orders must finish their class before their orders end.
  • First-time active duty applicants need to have 24 months of service before they can receive TA. However, O-5 level commanders can reduce the minimum in-service time to 18 months if they believe that you have demonstrated significant extraordinary effort beyond what has been required.

What can you use Tuition Assistance for?

  • You can use Tuition Assistance for educational programs through master’s degrees.
  • You can use TA for career and technical education certificates if the programs are accredited by an accrediting body recognized by the Department of Education and be approved by the Department of Veterans Affairs as well as having a signed DOD memorandum of understanding.
  • TA is for tuition only, and not for fees or costs such as room and board, books, or transportation. You also can not use TA for the cost of exams.
  • There is a limit for TA of two classes at a time. First-time TA users need to start with just one class unless there is documentation that you have had at least an associate’s degree or at least 60 academic credits and a minimum grade point average GPA of 2.0.
  • No courses can overlap.
  • You can not use Tuition Assistance for duplicate degrees or double majors.

How does one request Tuition Assistance?

  • Your first step would be to contact your Marine Corps Voluntary Education Center to receive educational counseling in person or by phone and to help determine the courses that you need to take.
  • You will then need to fill out an application in WebTA.
  • You should start your application at least 60 days in advance of the course or courses you want to take.

How much does USMC Tuition Assistance cover?

The Marine Corps will pay for 100% of your tuition, up to $250 per semester hour, $166 per quarter hour, and $16.67 per clock hour. There is also a cap of $4,500 per fiscal year.

What do I need to know about Tuition Assistance eligibility in the Marine Corps?

  • Your application must be command approved before it can be forwarded to the Voluntary Education Center for final approval.
  • The command approval is not automatic and will be based on the command’s anticipated mission requirements.
  • Your USMC Tuition Assistance application will need to be authorized before the start of the term.
  • You will need to print your voucher out and turn that into your school accounting office to process payment.
  • You will also need to make sure that you have completed the College 101 Brief, which is a 10-15 minute online Powerpoint presentation. First time TA users will also need to complete the Marine Corps Institute Personal Financial Management Course.

If you are serving in the US Marine Corps and would like to use Tuition Assistance for your education, make sure you qualify and make plans to sign up to receive these USMC educational benefits.

You can look up over 2,100 schools that accept Tuition Assistance in the CollegeRecon School Search tool.  Under the tab labeled “Vet/Military Service”, please check the filter “Approved for TA Funding.”

RELATED:

 

TUITION ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS:

 

 

 

 

 

Maine Veterans Benefits & Disabled Veterans Benefits

The following are the Maine veterans’ benefits programs for education, employment, nursing home care, and taxes. You can also learn about veterans’ benefits in other states.

Maine Veteran Benefits

Education Benefits for Maine Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the state of Maine.

Maine Dependents Education Benefits Program

Maine offers a 100% waiver of tuition and fees for spouses and dependents of qualifying veterans.

To qualify, veterans must meet one of the following requirements:

  • Have a VA-rated 100% total permanent disability rating resulting from a service-connected disability.
  • Killed in action;
  • Died from a service-connected disability;
  • Totally disabled due to a service-connected disability, but whose death was not related to the service-connected disability;
  • On active duty listed for more than 90 days as missing in action, captured or forcibly detained or interned in the line of duty.

For the purposes of qualifying for these Maine benefits, a veteran is defined as someone who entered military service from the state. 

Others may qualify if they are “from this State or has been a resident of this State for 5 years immediately preceding application for aid and, if living, continues to reside in this State throughout the duration of benefits administered under the educational benefits program” according to the official site.

This benefit may be used at the University of Maine System, Maine Community Colleges, and Maine Maritime Academy.

State of Maine Guard Tuition Assistance

Members of the Maine National Guard may qualify for tuition assistance for schools in the University of Maine and Maine Community College Systems, as well as Maine Maritime Academy. This assistance is paid only after any other financial aid is applied. The following requirements also apply–the servicemember must:

  • Have completed basic training or received a commission
  • Must serve for at least one year after receiving financial assistance
  • Must apply for all other tuition benefits including federal benefits and grants.

You must maintain academic progress and must not have any disciplinary actions in your personnel file.

Find colleges in Maine with our School Finder. Use the filters to sort schools by state.

Tax Benefits for Maine Veterans

Income Tax Breaks For Maine Veterans

Qualifying Maine veterans may be exempt from paying income taxes on military pay, military retirement pay, and military disability retirement pay. Hostile fire pay is also exempt from Maine state income tax.

Property Tax Breaks For Veterans

Veterans and their surviving spouses may qualify for a property tax exemption of up to $6,000 (in 2022, your experience may vary) on a primary residence. To qualify, the applicant must be:

  • A Maine resident
  • 62 years or older
  • A veteran of a recognized war period, OR;
  • Received the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal OR;
  • Received a 100% disability from the VA, OR;
  • Became 100% disabled while serving.

There is also a Surviving Spouse property tax exemption for those who were married to a veteran who would have qualified for the tax break if they were still alive. Surviving spouses must be:

  • Maine residents
  • Married to a veteran eligible for a property tax exemption at the time of death
  • Unremarried
  • Receiving a pension or compensation as a Surviving Spouse

Financial Benefits For Maine Veterans

Veterans’ Emergency Financial Assistance

The Veterans Emergency Financial Assistance Program is offered to veterans who are struggling with a financial emergency.

Grants of up to $2,000 are offered to qualifying veterans who are state residents and need funds to avoid becoming homeless, to repair a damaged home, or “any other condition that puts the veteran at risk of not having the basic necessities of food, shelter, or safety” according to the State of Maine.

Contact the Maine Bureau of Veterans’ Services for information on how to apply.

Salute ME Home Loans For Veterans

MaineHousing offers qualified military members a discount on a MainHousing First Home Loan 30-year fixed interest rate mortgage, and offers to waive the first-time homebuyer requirement for veterans who have previously owned a home.

Types of homes that may be eligible under this program include:

  • New construction and existing construction single-family homes
  • Owner-occupied properties up to four units
  • Condominiums
  • Permanently attached mobile homes on owned or leased land

Typically these homes must be primary residences and not investment properties. The Salute ME discount can be combined with MaineHousing programs offered by participating lenders::

  • Federal Housing Authority (FHA)
  • Rural Development (RD)
  • Veterans Administration (VA)
  • Mobile Home Self-Insured (MHSI)
  • Uninsured (20% down payment)
  • MaineHousing approved Private Mortgage Insurance (Arch Pilot)

Some restrictions may apply depending on the program. To qualify you must remain on active duty, have been honorably discharged from military service, or served on active duty for 180 days or within a war zone.

Nursing Home Benefits for Maine Veterans

There are six Maine Veterans’ Homes (MVH):

  • Augusta
  • Bangor
  • Caribou
  • Machias
  • Scarborough
  • South Paris

Services and options may vary depending on the facility, but typical services include rehabilitation and therapy, long-term, short-term and skilled nursing care.

To qualify, veterans must be honorably discharged from the military, must have been a resident of Maine at the time of their entry into the US Armed Forces, or be residents of Maine at the time of their application to MVH.

Placement is also an option for qualifying spouses and surviving spouses.

  • All applicants under the Medicaid Program must be considered “medically eligible”.
  • All applicants must submit to a pre-admission screening.
  • MVH accepts Medicaid, Medicare, and private insurance.
  • MVH also features a “daily stipend available to eligible veterans” aside from any VA benefits used to cover the costs of care.

Maine Burial Benefits For Veterans

The State of Maine operates four Veterans’ Cemetery System cemeteries:

  • Northern Maine Veterans’ Memorial Cemetery in Caribou
  • Central Maine Veterans’ Cemetery – Civic Center Drive
  • Central Maine Veterans’ Cemetery – Mt. Vernon Road
  • Southern Maine Veterans’ Cemetery – Springvale

Services include providing a plot or niche, opening and closing of the grave, and perpetual care. A headstone or marker is provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs at no cost.

Eligibility is identical to those for burial in a VA National Cemetery. In general, the following are required:

  • Must have a discharge other than Dishonorable, OR;
  • Died while on active duty, OR;
  • Served at least 20 years in the National Guard or U.S. Armed Forces Reserves and qualified for military retired pay;
  • Reserve component Service members activated for federal service;
  • Spouses and dependents (some restrictions apply)

Pre-need services are available but physical reservations of a plot or niche may not be permitted.

Veteran Employment Benefits in Maine

Veterans’ Hiring Preference For State Jobs

Qualifying veterans and spouses may be offered hiring preference when competing for state employment.

Some states offer points on competitive exams; in the State of Maine preference is offered by providing interview opportunities, as well as job counseling in the event that the veteran or spouse is not hired for that position. Who qualifies for this preference?

  • Veterans who served on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces
  • Veterans who served on active duty in the Guard or Reserve
  • Gold Star Surviving Spouses

For more information regarding Maine veteran’s benefits, please visit the Maine Bureau of Veterans’ Services

Related state military and veteran information:

State Veterans’ Benefits – By State

Maine BAH Rates

Yellow Ribbon Schools

 

 

 

 

Louisiana Veterans Benefits & Disabled Veterans Benefits

The following are the Louisiana veterans’ benefits programs for education, housing, nursing home care, and financial benefits. You can also learn about veterans’ benefits in other states.

Veteran Education Benefits in Louisiana

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ education benefits programs provided by the state of Louisiana.

In-State Tuition For Louisiana Veterans And Active Duty Military

Louisiana veterans and currently serving service members in the state may qualify for in-state tuition at any state-supported public college or university. Eligibility requirements apply and you will need to inquire with the school of your choice on how to claim your in-state status.

Related: Scholarships for Military Spouses

Louisiana Title 29 Dependents Educational Assistance

Louisiana offers education assistance to surviving spouses of veterans who died in wartime, and to the children of disabled veterans with VA disability ratings of 90% or higher.

The Louisiana Department of Veterans Affairs and local colleges alike have minimal information about this benefit, stating that the applicant is exempt from paying tuition or school-imposed fees.

There is no mention of a cap on the benefit, or whether the benefit can be used for a single degree or multiple programs.

According to multiple sources, when you apply and are approved for the program, “Eligible students will receive a Fee Exemption Certificate from the Louisiana Department of Veteran Affairs.” You must submit the original certificate to the school to get the tuition exception.

Contact the Louisiana college or university of your choice to determine what educational help might be available to you under this program.

To qualify:

  • A deceased veteran must have been a resident of the State of Louisiana for at least 12 months before joining the military.
  • A living veteran must have lived in the state for at least 24 months prior to a dependent being approved for the program.
  • A surviving spouse must use the benefit within 10 years.
  • Dependents must be between sixteen and twenty-five to qualify.

Louisiana National Guard Tuition

Members may be eligible for a State Tuition Exemption Program if they meet the following requirements:

  • Must be a drilling member of the Louisiana National Guard
  • Must be living in the state
  • Must be degree-seeking and maintain academic progress
  • Must pay all fees aside from tuition.

This program waives all tuition but requires student payment of other fees including books and lab charges.

Find colleges in Louisiana with our School Finder.  Use the filters to sort schools by state.

Tax Benefits for Veterans in Louisiana

Louisiana veterans may claim a variety of tax benefits. Those stationed out of state for 120 days or more may qualify for a state tax exemption up to $30 thousand (2022 rates, successive years may vary) on military earnings.

Military pay exempt from federal taxes may also be exempt from Louisiana state taxes. This is true of combat pay, hazardous duty pay, etc.

Military disability pay is generally not taxable under Louisiana state law at press time. Louisiana income tax is not charged on the following disability benefits:

  • Disability compensation
  • Pension payments for disabilities
  • Accessibility grants
  • Accessibility grants for motor vehicles
  • Benefits under a dependent-care program

Homestead Tax Exemptions for Louisiana Disabled Veterans and Surviving Spouses

The state of Louisiana offers a homestead exemption to qualifying homeowners worth up to $7,500 (in 2022, successive years may vary). This is NOT the veteran homestead exemption. It is generically offered to those with property “owned and occupied by any person”.

Above and beyond this extension, qualifying veterans and surviving spouses may be eligible to claim an additional exemption for the same amount listed above (in 2022). This effectively lowers the overall assessed value of the home for property tax purposes.

Qualifications include:

  • The home must be owned and occupied by a Veteran with a service-connected disability rating of 100%.
  • The unremarried Surviving Spouse of an eligible deceased disabled Veteran is also eligible for this exemption. This is true IF the Surviving Spouse remains the owner/occupier.
  • If the Surviving Spouse relocates, they may still receive consideration for the exemption
  • If the property is valued at more than $15,000 the owner is responsible for property taxes on any assessed amount over $15,000.

Louisiana State Nursing Homes For Veterans

The Louisiana Department of Veterans Affairs operates Veterans Homes in the following locations:

  • Bossier City
  • Monroe
  • Reserve
  • Jackson
  • Jennings

Services may vary depending on the facility but typical options include:

  • Long-term care
  • short-term care
  • Rehabilitative therapy
  • Alzheimer’s and intermediate care
  • Skilled nursing care
  • Mental health services
  • Pharmacy

Veterans must typically be state residents to apply. This applies unless they are referred by an in-state VA medical center or by the state Department of Veterans Affairs.

Vets must have served more than 90 days in most cases but those with fewer than 90 days of service must have been medically discharged and have an Honorable discharge. A condition of admission is pre-screening for communicable diseases or conditions the facility is unable to provide care for.

LA National Guard Death and Disability Benefit

Louisiana National Guard members suffering a permanent or total disability while on federal or state active duty on or after September 11, 2001, and the surviving spouse or dependents of someone killed in action may qualify for death and disability benefits from the State of Louisiana. In the past, this benefit has paid a $250,000 death benefit or a $100,000 disability benefit. Apply for this benefit with the Louisiana Department of Veterans Affairs.

Veteran Employment and Veteran Business Benefits in Louisiana

Louisiana State and Federal Civil Service Hiring Preference

Qualifying veterans and spouses may be eligible for hiring preference from the State of Louisiana in the form of preference points added to the scores of competitive job exams.

To qualify, you must be an honorably discharged veteran or the spouse of an honorably discharged veteran who:

  • Served in combat, in any campaign for which a campaign medal was awarded OR;
  • Served at least 90 days of active duty after September 11, 2001, OR;
  • Served on active duty and has one or more service-connected disabilities.

Five or ten preference points may be added depending on circumstances. These points are awarded for “original appointment” only, they may not be used for promotions.

Other Louisiana State Veterans’ Benefits

Military Family Assistance (MFA) Fund

The Military Family Assistance Fund (MFA) offers financial support to Louisiana veterans and their families in times of financial need. Assistance up to $10,000 (for a single claim) is available in a 12-month period. Minimum time in service requirements apply and an Honorable discharge is required.

To qualify one of the following must apply. You must be a current resident of the state AND:

  • Veterans must have 24 months of continuous active-duty service.
  • Must have 90 days of active duty and a medically-related discharge or the veteran has a “compensable service-connected disability”.
  • The veteran received a discharge with less than 90 days of service for a service-connected disability.

For more information regarding Louisiana veterans’ benefits, please visit the Louisiana Department of Veterans Affairs

Related state military and veteran information:

State Veterans’ Benefits – By State

Louisiana BAH Rates

Yellow Ribbon Schools

 

 

 

Kentucky Veterans Benefits & Disabled Veterans Benefits

The following are the Kentucky veterans’ benefits programs in the areas of education, employment, taxes and healthcare. You can also learn about veterans’ benefits in other states.

Kentucky Veterans Benefits

Education Benefits for Kentucky Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the state of Kentucky.

Kentucky Tuition Waiver

The Commonwealth of Kentucky offers a tuition waiver for qualifying spouses and dependents of disabled and deceased veterans. Under this program a qualifying student may attend any two-year, four-year, vocational, or technical school supported by the Kentucky Department of Education.

The veteran must have qualifying circumstances:

  • Died on active duty, OR;
  • Died as a direct result of a service-connected disability, OR;
  • VA-rated as 100% service-connected disabled OR;
  • Totally disabled (non-service connected) with wartime service OR;
  • Is deceased and lived in KY at the time of death and served during a wartime period

Qualifying family members include:

  • children
  • stepchildren
  • adopted children
  • spouses
  • Unremarried surviving spouses

There are some additional considerations for this program–the veteran must be a current resident of Kentucky, and the student must attend either online or in-person classes at a qualifying school but does not have to reside in the state.

​​Kentucky National Guard Tuition Award Program

Service members in the Kentucky National Guard may qualify for a tuition award good at state-supported colleges and universities. To qualify you must be currently serving in the National Guard and meet all minimum requirements. You cannot have disciplinary actions in your file and you must have completed basic training.

This benefit pays up to the maximum in-state tuition for full or part-time study at any Kentucky public college, but this program operates only while funds are available. Surviving spouses and dependents may also qualify for this tuition program.

Find colleges in Kentucky with our School Finder.  Use the filters to sort schools by state.

Kentucky Tax Benefits For Veterans

Kentucky State Tax Relief For Military Pay

The Commonwealth of Kentucky does not charge state income tax on military pay.

Kentucky State Income Tax Relief For Military Spouses

Depending on circumstances, military spouses may be offered the same state income tax relief as the military spouse.

Kentucky State Income Tax Credits For Military Retirement Pay

Kentucky allows “all pension and retirement income” to be excluded up to $31,110.  Enter this subtraction on Schedule M of your state income tax form.

Combat Zone Tax Extensions

Kentucky residents serving in a combat zone are not required to file a state income tax return until 12 months after the deployment ends. This is offered to active duty, Guard, and Reserve members alike.

Kentucky Property Tax Exemption

Homeowners 65 years old or older, and those who are totally disabled may qualify for a property tax exemption on a primary residence. In 2020 the exclusion was worth more than $30k; check with your local tax authority to learn what the current year’s exemption is.

Kentucky Nursing Home Care For Veterans

Kentucky operates a group of long-term, skilled nursing facilities for qualifying veterans. Application requirements include not having a Dishonorable discharge, the applicant must be a resident of Kentucky prior to submitting an application, and have a medical need for nursing home care.

Veterans’ Centers are located in four different locations in Kentucky.

  • Wilmore
  • Hazard
  • Hanson
  • Radcliff

According to the official site for these veteran homes, there is “no application process for admission to the center”. Instead, those who need care are directed to contact an admissions coordinator, “to have your name added to the interest list”.

In spite of the center’s “no application” policy, you will be required to furnish pre-admissions documents including:

  • DD214 or equivalent
  • Insurance Cards
  • Medicaid Card
  • Proof of Kentucky Residency
  • Power of Attorney for Medical and Financial needs.

Admissions are approved by a committee.

Kentucky State Burial Benefits For Veterans

The Commonwealth of Kentucky operates five State Veterans Cemeteries in the following locations:

  • Kentucky Veterans Cemetery West, Hopkinsville
  • Kentucky Veterans Cemetery Central, Radcliff
  • Kentucky Veterans Cemetery North, Williamstown
  • Kentucky Veterans Cemetery South East, Hyden
  • Kentucky Veterans Cemetery North East, Greenup County

Burial benefits in these cemeteries include a grave or niche, opening and closing the gravesite, perpetual care, plus a marker or headstone. Veterans are buried or interred at no cost, family member burial may require a fee. You must be a Kentucky resident (see below) and in general requirements for these facilities are identical to the requirements for burial in a VA national cemetery.

To qualify:

  • Applicant must be discharged from active duty under conditions other than dishonorable, OR;
  • Applicant died while on active duty, OR;
  • Applicant served at least 20 years in the National Guard or U.S. Armed Forces Reserves and qualified for military retired pay, OR;
  • Applicant is a member of the Guard or Reserve and was activated for federal service, OR;
  • Applicant is a qualifying spouse or a dependent child

Kentucky residency is, as mentioned above, required by birth, service, or relocation.

Employment Benefits for Kentucky Veterans

Veterans Preference Hiring For State Jobs

The Commonwealth of Kentucky offers veterans’ preference by granting “interview preference” to qualifying vets and family members who want to compete for state local government jobs.

To be awarded interview preference, applicants must meet the minimum job requirements listed for the position and provide documentation to support the job application before the job has officially closed. This preference is only for initial hires. To qualify, you must be one of the following:

  • A veteran with an Honorable or General (Under Honorable Conditions) discharge
  • A current service member on active duty, or as a member of the Guard/Reserve
  • A spouse of an eligible veteran or current service member
  • An unremarried surviving spouse of a deceased veteran
  • A dependent parent of a disabled or deceased veteran

For more information regarding Kentucky veterans benefits, please visit the Kentucky Department of Veterans’ Affairs 

Housing Benefits For Kentucky Veterans

The Kentucky Housing Finance Corporation (HFC) offers qualifying applicants VA loans with down payment assistance options for need-based home loans.

  • Borrowers may be required to meet income limits and other need-based restrictions.
  • The down payment assistance is offered as a second mortgage with a low interest rate.
  • This assistance is for homes purchased within the state of Kentucky and is only offered for primary residences.
  • Housing counseling may be required as a condition of approval.

These loans are issued via a network of participating lenders, the Kentucky HFC directs all applicants to discuss their mortgage needs with one of these participating lenders in the state.

Related state military and veteran information:

State Veterans’ Benefits – By State

Kentucky BAH Rates

Yellow Ribbon Schools

 

 

Illinois Veterans Benefits

There are many federal programs for veterans, but there are also programs for veterans in the state of Illinois. You can also learn about veterans’ benefits in other states.

Education Benefits for Illinois Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the states.

Illinois Educational Opportunity Grant

The Educational Opportunity Grant provides the children of qualifying veterans a grant of $250. This is a cash grant provided to children between the ages of 10 and 18 and is meant to be used at a school or vocational training program.

Qualifying criteria for veterans include having a 100% service-connected disability for at least two years or having died from service-connected causes on active duty. This grant must be reapplied for each year.

State of Illinois MIA-POW Scholarship

This Illinois state scholarship offers full payment of tuition and mandatory fees for attendance at any Illinois state-supported college or university for up to four years. The scholarship is intended for the dependents of veterans declared MIA or POW, or those who died on active duty or are 100% disabled due to a service-related medical issue.

Other qualifying criteria include:

  • Qualifying applicants include:
  • Spouse
  • Children (biological, stepchildren, or adopted) under the age of 18 at the time of marriage

The veteran’s residency status is an important factor:

  • The veteran must have been an Illinois resident when they entered military service OR;
  • Became an Illinois resident within six months after entering active military service, OR;
  • Was a resident of Illinois for at least 15 consecutive years after entering active duty as of the date of application.

Illinois Veterans’ Grant

The Illinois Veteran Grant (IVG) Program pays full tuition and mandatory fees at all Illinois state-supported colleges, universities and community colleges for qualifying veterans who are also Illinois residents. To be considered for the program you must:

  • Have an Honorable discharge;
  • Must have lived in Illinois for six months before entering the service;
  • Must have at least one full year of active duty
  • Must return to Illinois within six months of discharge from the service.

If you qualify for both IVG and the GI Bill, you may be able to receive benefits from both programs during the same academic year.

The decision to draw these benefits concurrently may have financial implications compared to using each benefit individually–be sure to ask your admissions counselor about how using both programs at once may affect your benefits.

Illinois National Guard Grant

The Illinois National Guard, also known as the ING Grant, pays tuition and eligible fees (registration, graduation, general activity, matriculation and term fees) at all Illinois public universities or public community colleges.

National Guard members with less than 10 years of active duty service in the Guard may earn up to 120 “eligibility units” for this program. Guard members with more than 10 years of active duty National Guard service may earn 180 eligibility units to use. You must not be in default on a student loan to be approved for the ING Grant.

University Of Illinois Children of Veterans Scholarship

Every county in the State of Illinois has the ability to award up to three tuition waivers for children of qualifying Illinois veterans. These waivers are good for four consecutive years of tuition offered specifically at the University of Illinois–this is not a program offered by all Illinois schools.

  • Up to three tuition waivers per county are offered each year.
  • Veteran parents must have served in an “eligible conflict” such as World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Beirut, Grenada, Southwest Asia, Operation Enduring Freedom, or Operation Iraqi Freedom.
  • You must be a permanent resident of the Illinois county from which you apply.
  • This tuition waiver is not meant for out-of-state tuition.
  • A new, complete application must be submitted each year for applicants who did not receive the award.

Preference is given to the children of veterans who have died or who have become disabled.

Find colleges in Illinois with our School Finder.  Use the filters to sort schools by state.

Tax Benefits for Illinois Veterans

Returning Veterans’ Homestead Exemption

The Returning Veterans’ Homestead Exemption is an option for qualifying wartime veterans to claim a one-time $5,000 reduction to their home’s assessed value after returning home from wartime duty.

These exemptions are not automatic and must be applied for–contact your nearest County Assessor’s Office to learn the current year’s application requirements and submission process.

Specially Adapted Housing Tax Exemption

This exemption is allowed on the assessed value of a home “for which federal funds have been used for the purchase or construction of specially adapted housing” according to the State of Illinois.

This exemption is for primary residences only. This tax relief is offered for veterans with qualifying service-connected disabilities “for the purpose of acquiring or remodeling suitable dwelling units with special fixtures or moveable facilities made necessary by the veteran’s permanent and total service-connected disabilities.”

Apply for this benefit via a Veteran Service Office or contact the State of Illinois Department of Veteran Affairs.

Tax Exemption for Mobile Homes

This Illinois state tax exemption for qualifying disabled veterans applies “to the tax imposed by the Mobile Home Local Services Tax Act.” Qualifying for this tax break requires the veteran to be authorized to receive a VA Specially Adapted Housing Grant.

You must be a permanent resident of the state on the first day of the tax year you claim the tax exemption for. Illinois tax laws are subject to frequent change; if you aren’t sure what tax laws apply to your situation, contact a tax professional to learn how to take advantage of this benefit.

Illinois State Healthcare Benefits For Veterans

The Illinois Veterans Care Program is a need-based option that provides healthcare at reduced, income-based monthly rates to qualifying low-income veterans. This program is primarily intended for:

  • Uninsured low-income Veterans with “the least access” to reliable healthcare
  • Low-income veterans who cannot access VA health care. Veterans Care offers an affordable option for eligible Illinois Veterans who are looking for comprehensive healthcare coverage.

Those enrolled in the Veterans Care Program pay monthly premiums based on income, typically between $40 and $70 at press time. Services may include:

  • Hospital/clinic care
  • Doctor visits
  • Pharmacy
  • Physical, occupational, and speech therapy
  • Laboratory tests
  • X-rays
  • Alcohol and substance abuse services
  • Medical equipment, supplies, and appliances
  • Emergency medical transportation
  • Hospice care
  • Home healthcare
  • Dialysis
  • Family planning
  • Optometric care
  • Podiatric care

Who qualifies:

  • Veterans ages 19 through 64 with no health insurance coverage for six months or more (certain exception apply)
  • Must not have a Dishonorable discharge
  • Not eligible for VA healthcare
  • Not eligible for other state healthcare programs
  • Must have served 180 consecutive days of active duty
  • Veteran income meets or falls below the Illinois Veterans Care Income Threshold by County.

Apply for this benefit at any Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs office.

Illinois State Veterans’ Homes

Since 1886, the State of Illinois has operated veterans’ homes offering skilled care and long-term resident care. What began as a single veteran’s home in Quincy has over the years expanded to include five facilities in the state:

  • Anna
  • Chicago
  • LaSalle
  • Manteno
  • Quincy

General admission policies include allowing “any” honorably discharged veteran if one of the following applies:

  • Has served in the U.S. Armed Forces for one day during wartime, or served in a “hostile fire environment” and received a qualifying service medal.
  • Was retired for a service-connected disability or injury.
  • Has served on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces for at least 24 months after September 7, 1980.
  • Has served as a Reservist or National Guard member called to federal service or who completed 20 years of satisfactory service and is eligible for military retirement benefits.
  • Has been discharged for reasons of hardship or released from active duty due to a reduction in the U.S. Armed Forces.

Other admissions requirements may apply. Beds are provided on a first come, first served basis with no exceptions. Contact the individual home you wish to apply to (see above) for specific admission policies for that facility as they may vary.

Illinois State Veteran Burial Benefits

Illinois State Indigent Veterans Burial Benefit

A Veterans Assistance Commission or an “individual county of Illinois” may provide burial assistance for qualifying, honorably discharged homeless veterans. This benefit is offered to surviving family members with a demonstrated financial need as defined by the state.

Illinois State Veteran Headstone Reimbursement

When the Department of Veterans Affairs provides a headstone or marker for a deceased veteran, the Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs offers reimbursement for transporting and setting up the grave marker within the state. Illinois State Headstone Fees Benefit For Veterans

At the time of this writing, this benefit is capped at $125, subject to change from year to year..

Employment Benefits for Illinois’ Veterans

Illinois offers veteran preference points to qualifying vets and family members for competitive job exams when hiring for state employment. The amount of preference depends on the veteran’s qualifying criteria which include, but may not be limited to the following:

Three Preference Points

Offered to those who served at least six months and received an honorable discharge. These points are also offered to those with hardship discharges, and those who were released from duty due to service-connected medical issues. Those who serve four years or more in the Guard or Reserve may also qualify.

Five Preference Points

Five points are offered to those who served in wartime for at least six months and have an Honorable discharge. Others who served in wartime and were discharged due to hardship or disability may also qualify.

10 Preference Points

Offered to disabled veterans, Purple Heart awardees, and qualifying surviving spouses. These points may also be offered to the parent of a veteran who died or has a service-connected disability.

Financial Benefits for Illinois Veterans

Illinois State Income Tax Policy on Military Pay:

Military pay may be subtracted from gross income for Illinois state income tax. This applies to:

  • Typical military pay
  • Pay while attending a military service academy
  • ROTC pay
  • Guard/Reserve pay

Illinois Disabled Veterans Housing Act

This state-level veteran benefit is offered in the form of a lump sum payment up to $15 thousand meant to offset the costs of adapting a home to accommodate a veteran’s “permanent and total disability” according to the State of Illinois.

To qualify for this state-level option, the veteran must be VA-certified as being eligible for the federal-level VA Specially Adapted Housing Grant. You must apply for this certification first prior to applying for the state-level program.

Other requirements include being a state resident when entering military service. Other grants may also be offered to cover remodeling costs. Apply at any Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs office.

Line of Duty Compensation

The Illinois Court of Claims offers a death benefit (worth more than $300 thousand in 2022) to the next of kin of Illinois service members who die on duty in support of the Global War on Terrorism.

Beneficiaries have two years to file a claim using a form from the Illinois Attorney General’s office. Submit the form to the  Illinois Court of Claims using the address provided on the application form.

Be sure to submit the following documentation with your application:

  • Report of Casualty (DD Form 1300)
  • Certificate of Death (DD form 2064) (if available)
  • Record of Emergency Data (DD Form 93) (if available)
  • Servicemembers Group Life Insurance Election and Certificate (SGLV822

State of Illinois Bonus Payments For Military Service

The State of Illinois offers bonus payments for Illinois veterans who were state residents for 12 months before entering the military. Some are one-time payments, others may recur. You can apply for these bonus payments through the Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs.

Bonuses and qualifications include but may not be limited to:

World War II

  • Offered to veterans with 60 days of active duty service between September 16, 1940, and September 3, 1945.
  • $10 per month for domestic service
  • $15 per month for foreign service.
  • Survivors are entitled to a benefit of $9,000 (in 2022) in cases of service-related death in combat.

Korean War

  • Offered to veterans who served in Korea between June 27, 1950, and July 27, 1953, and received the Korean Service Medal.
  • $100 bonus payment

Vietnam War

  • Offered to those who served in Vietnam from January 1, 1961, through March 28, 1973.
  • Also offered to those who served in Vietnam Frequent Wind: April 29, 30, 1975.
  • $100 bonus for veterans who received the Vietnam Service Medal or Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal for Vietnam

Persian Gulf

  • Offered to veterans who served between August 2, 1990, to November 30, 1995, and received the Southwest Asia Service Medal.
  • $100 bonus

Global War on Terrorism

  • For veterans who served on or after September 11, 2001, who served 30 consecutive or 60 non-consecutive days of foreign or sea service.
  • To qualify you must have earned one of the following: and be in receipt of one of the following medals: Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Iraq Campaign Medal, and Afghanistan Campaign Medal.
  • $100 bonus

Global War on Terrorism Survivor’s Compensation

  • Offered to survivors of veterans who were killed by terrorist acts or hostile activities during military service on or after September 11, 2001,
  • $3,000 one-time death benefit

POW Compensation

  • Offered to those taken prisoner in Southeast Asia, and were on active duty or employed by the US Government on or after January 1, 1961.
  • $50 for each month held captive.

For more information regarding Illinois veterans’ benefits, please see the Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs.

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Idaho Veterans Benefits & Disabled Veterans Benefits

Idaho State Benefits For Military Members

The following are the Idaho veterans’ benefits programs for education, employment, housing, and healthcare. You can also learn about veterans’ benefits in other states.

Education Benefits for Idaho Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the state of Idaho.

Idaho National Guard State Education Assistance Program (SEAP)

SEAP provides up to $4000 per fiscal year in tuition and registration fees for qualifying National Guard members. This program may be used at any Idaho public or private institution, but federal tuition assistance must be used first. Unlike some other military education benefits, SEAP funds are paid at the end of each semester or term.

To qualify for SEAP, the following must apply:

  • The applicant is a member of the Idaho National Guard.
  • The applicant has graduated from Basic Training and has no disciplinary issues.
  • The applicant has “no more than 4 unexcused absences” during the last 12 months according to Army.mil.
  • The applicant meets fitness and weight requirements for the Guard.
  • The applicant must have more than two years remaining of service obligation.
  • The applicant must remain in good standing with the Idaho National Guard for the entire course.

More information is at the Idaho National Guard official site.

In-State Tuition For Qualifying Idaho Servicemembers And Family

The State of Idaho, like many states, provides in-state tuition for qualifying servicemembers and their families. To qualify for in-state tuition under this program, students must meet state requirements which include, but may not be limited to, the following:

  • The student is an Idaho resident and military member (or family member) stationed outside of Idaho, OR;
  • The student and/or family members are stationed in Idaho, OR;
  • The student is a member of the Idaho National Guard or a family member. OR;
  • The student has an Honorable discharge after two years of service or more and applies for school within one year of separation. OR;
  • The student listed Idaho as their state of residence while they were serving or when separating.
  • The student has moved to Idaho to become a resident.

More information is available through the Registrar’s office of the school you wish to attend/

Find colleges in Idaho with our School Finder.  Use the filters to sort schools by state.

State of Idaho Financial Assistance For Veterans

The State of Idaho offers a cash grant to wartime veterans who have a demonstrated need in an emergency. The Idaho Veterans Emergency Grant Program provides up to $1,500 in emergency relief for food, fuel, housing, or “other necessities of daily living in a time of temporary emergency need” according to the State of Idaho.

Qualifying veterans (see below) may receive one grant in a six-month period and no grant may exceed $1,500. If a veteran is awarded a partial grant or a grant lower than the maximum, once the maximum lifetime benefit of $1,500 is reached the veteran no longer qualifies.

Basic eligibility requirements include, but may not be limited to:

  • Residency: Applicants must be Idaho state residents at application time.
  • Military discharge: Applicants must be discharged or separated under honorable conditions after 90 days active duty, or less in cases of a service-connected disability being the cause of discharge.
  • Idaho must be the home of record: The applicant must have Idaho listed as the home of record while serving. This may be waived if the applicant has been living in Idaho for the past five years.

Other requirements apply depending on who applies: the State of Idaho does not issue these grants to “residents of domiciliaries or long-term care facilities or to a potential recipient who refuses to take advantage of available government benefits or federal-state-local relief.”

The State of Idaho may require applicants to provide documentation that they have applied for other programs and advises that this program’s funds, “may not be used to duplicate assistance from other sources”.

Idaho National Guard Medical Coverage

Those who serve in the Idaho National Guard may qualify for medical coverage under Idaho Workers Compensation laws. If you serve in the Guard and become sick or injured in the line of duty, you may be covered, but those who are paid by another program won’t get compensation under this program. The law is designed to prevent duplicate payments.

You may qualify for National Guard medical coverage if you are on state active duty and you also qualify for Worker’s Compensation.

Tax Benefits for Idaho’s Veterans

State Income Tax Exemption

When active duty service members are stationed outside of the State of Idaho for longer than 120 days, they are exempt from Idaho state income tax on military income.

State of Idaho Military Retirement Pay Tax Exemption

Military retirement pay is exempt from Idaho state taxes.

Idaho Circuit Breaker Property Tax Reductions and Exemptions

Veterans who have a 10% or greater service-connected disability, and those who receive a pension from Veterans Affairs for a non-service-connected disability may qualify for the Idaho Circuit Breaker property tax reduction/exemption program.

Circuit Breaker reduces property taxes on the home and up to one acre of land, based on income from the previous year. This program may offer up to $1,500 in reductions on your property taxes.

You must be an Idaho resident, the property must be your primary residence, and you must meet income requirements. In 2021 those requirements were listed as earning less than $32,230. That amount is subject to change year-to-year and is listed here as a reference only. Your experience may vary.

The Circuit Breaker program changed in 2022, and current requirements include qualifying circumstances including but not limited to:

  • Being a former POW or hostage
  • Being a motherless or fatherless child under 18
  • Being a surviving spouse
  • Being disabled “as recognized by the Social Security Administration, Railroad Retirement Board, Federal Civil Service, VA”  or a public employment retirement system.

Nonresident Military Spouse Idaho Tax Exemption

Spouses of nonresident service members may be exempt from paying Idaho state income taxes if they are married to a service member on active duty stationed in Idaho but not a resident there. Spouses may also qualify if they moved to the state to be with the non-resident service member after having lived together elsewhere.

Claiming this tax exemption requires you to file an Idaho State Tax Commission form called ID-MS1, Employee’s Idaho Military Spouse Withholding Exemption Certificate. This must be submitted each year.

Nursing Home Benefits for Idaho Veterans

Idaho Veterans Home

The State of Idaho operates three veterans homes; one in Boise, one in Lewiston, and a facility in Pocatello. These facilities offer skilled care, occupational and physical therapy, and physical therapy. Admission requirements include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Open to qualifying peacetime or wartime veterans, and spouses.
  • Applicants must have served at least 90 days.
  • An Honorable discharge is required.
  • You must be a resident of the State of Idaho at application time.
  • You must either apply for or already be receiving a VA pension, and Aid and Attendance.
  • You must be eligible and apply for Medicaid benefits or be willing to pay the current maximum monthly amount
  • Veterans that served on active duty at least 90 days and received an honorable discharge, wartime veterans receive priority for admission

Applicants must require skilled nursing care, and the official site notes that veterans may be admitted “without regard to their financial status”.

Burial Benefits For Idaho Veterans

The State of Idaho operates the Idaho State Veterans Cemetery (with two locations) for eligible veterans and qualifying dependents. Like many state-run veteran cemeteries, services offered including a niche or burial plot, marker, and military funeral honors where available.

The Idaho State Veterans’ Cemetery accepts payment from the Department of Veterans Affairs for the burial fees, all other funeral expenses are the responsibility of the veteran’s estate. A burial fee may apply for dependents.

Eligibility for burial in an Idaho State Veterans Cemetery is the same as for VA National Cemeteries. You do not have to be an Idaho resident, you can have any discharge except Dishonorable, and members of the Guard/Reserve may also qualify.

Pre-registration is encouraged, but you may not be able to reserve or select a physical gravesite until the time of need.

Employment Benefits for Idaho Veterans

Public Employee Veterans Hiring Preference

Veterans who have served on active duty in the armed services, with an honorable discharge and who have a present service-connected disability of 10% or more, or are Purple Heart recipients can also receive preference points for state and federal exams. These points are added to the veteran’s final passing score. The points can not be used for promotions, transfers, or reassignments and may only be added for the veteran’s initial hire.

Veterans who are discharged under honorable conditions, and the surviving spouse of a so-called “preference eligible veteran”, may be eligible for five preference points.

Disabled veterans who have a present service-connected disability of 10% or more, or are Purple Heart recipients may qualify for 10 points. Surviving spouses of these applicants may also receive 10 points. Spouses of veterans unable to qualify for public employment because of a service-connected disability may also claim this preference.

Professional License Fee Exemption

Those who serve and who hold occupational or professional licenses issued by the state of Idaho may be exempt from fees associated with professional or occupational licenses for the duration of service and for up to six months after leaving the military.

For more information regarding Idaho veterans benefits, please visit the Idaho Division of Veterans Services

Related state military and veteran information:

State Veterans’ Benefits – By State

Idaho BAH Rates

Yellow Ribbon Schools

 

Hawaii Veterans Benefits & Disabled Veterans Benefits

Hawaii State Benefits for Veterans

The following are the Hawaii state veterans’ benefits programs for education, housing, healthcare, and employment. You can also learn about veterans’ benefits in other states.

Education Benefits for Hawaii’s Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the state of Hawaii.

Hawaii Residency Waivers for Nonresident Veterans, Service Members, and Dependents:

Qualifying military members and their dependents may be eligible to attend colleges in Hawaii at the resident tuition rate. The following requirements may apply depending on your status as an active duty member, a veteran, or a dependent, as described at Army.mil:

  • Service members in Hawaii on active duty.
  • “Authorized dependents” who accompany the servicemember while stationed in Hawaii
  • Hawaii National Guard Service members and Reservists serving in a Hawaii-based unit.
  • Veterans in Hawaii who served at least 90 days on active duty using VA educational benefits within 3 years of discharge
  • Students living in Hawaii using transferred VA educational benefits. You must enroll within three years of the servicemember’s discharge after active duty service (90 days or more).
  • Students living in Hawaii using the Fry Scholarship
  • Veterans using the VA Veteran Readiness and Employment program

Contact the admissions office at your chosen school to learn how to apply for this waiver.

Hawaii Army National Guard State Tuition Assistance Program (STAP)

STAP features tuition waivers for eligible military members. This option is only offered after you have completed basic training and any required advanced training. It covers the full cost of tuition at community colleges and 50% of tuition for 4-year universities.

You may qualify for STAP if:

  • You are a Hawaii resident.
  • You are an undergraduate working towards a degree.
  • You are currently serving in the Hawaii National Guard.
  • You maintain satisfactory academic performance.

STAP may be used with the GI Bill. To apply, contact the Hawaii National Guard Education Office.

Find colleges in Hawaii with our School Finder. Use the filters to sort schools by state.

Tax Benefits For Hawaii Veterans

Veterans with qualifying disabilities and their spouses may be eligible for tax relief on primary residences. There may also be tax breaks for vehicles owned by veterans with qualifying disabilities. However, these tax breaks are not standardized state-wide; the benefits may vary depending on the island:

Tax-Free Military Retirement Income

The State of Hawaii does not tax military retirement pay.

Tax Exemptions For Specially Adapted Vehicles

The State of Hawaii offers tax exemptions to qualifying veterans who own vehicles “subsidized by the Department of Veterans Affairs”. If you received a VA grant to adapt a motor vehicle or you got a grant to purchase a modified vehicle, you may qualify for this tax exemption. Contact the Hawaii Department of Motor Vehicles for application information.

Nursing Home Benefits for Hawaii Veterans

The Yukio Okutsu State Veterans Home

The Yukio Okutsu State Veterans Home in Hilo, Hawaii offers both short-term and residential care. This facility features 24-hour skilled care, respite care, hospice, plus private and semi-private room options.

Admission requirements include being eligible for VA benefits, being over age 55, and there must be a documented medical need for skilled care. You must be a Hawaii resident for at least one year before applying, and you must have been a Hawaii resident before entering military service. Military spouses may also qualify, but they are accepted on a space-available basis.

RELATED LINKS:

How to Become A Nurse as a Military Spouse

Hot Degrees: Nursing

Employment Benefits for Hawaii’s Veterans

Employment Preference For State and Federal Jobs

Veterans may qualify for preference points for Civil Service exams for state or federal jobs. A veteran may qualify for 5 preference points; qualifying disabled veterans may be awarded 10 points.

The 5-point veterans’ preference may be awarded to veterans with Honorable discharges who served active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces:

  • From December 7, 1941, to July 1, 1955.
  • For more than 180 consecutive days from January 31, 1955, through October 14, 1976.
  • In a campaign or expedition for which a campaign badge or service medal was authorized.

A 10-point veterans preference is offered to those who meet the following criteria:

  • Honorably separated veterans with service-connected disabilities.
  • Purple Heart recipients.
  • The spouse of an honorably separated veteran with a qualifying service-connected disability.
  • An un-remarried, surviving spouse of a service member who died while on active duty
  • An un-remarried surviving spouse of an Honorably discharged veteran who served during the periods cited above.

An application form and additional information regarding veterans’ preference points can be found at the State of Hawaii official site.

Hawaii State Employee Leave for Military Duty:

Those employed by the State of Hawaii or who work city jobs in the state may qualify for up to 15 days of paid military leave for Guard or Reserve military duty each year.

Hawaii State Employee Military Caregiver Leave

Hawaii State employees may qualify for up to 26 weeks of unpaid leave to act as a caregiver for a military family member who received an injury or illness in the line of duty.

Burial Benefits For Hawaii Veterans

Hawaii State Veterans Cemetery (HSVC)

HSVC offers burial and interment services to qualifying military veterans and “eligible dependents”. The official site notes, “Family members utilize a one-grave concept” and HSVC offers a gravesite, marker, perpetual care of the site, plus opening and closing of the grave. Things to know about HSVC:

  • In cases where both spouses are veterans, two gravesites and two headstones may be provided by request.
  • Some pre-need arrangements are possible, but the physical gravesite or interment location cannot be reserved in advance.

The official site advises that application criteria will apply in the same way as for eligibility to be buried in a VA national cemetery. HSVC requires the veteran’s family to pay for mortuary services and other costs such as transportation of remains.

Eligibility for burial at HSVC is identical to the requirements for VA National Cemeteries. In general, you must meet the following:

  • Discharged from active duty service with any discharge other than Dishonorable. OR;
  • Died while serving on active duty. OR;
  • Served at least 20 years in the National Guard or U.S. Armed Forces Reserves and considered eligible for military retirement pay. OR;
  • Reserve component Service members activated for federal service. OR;
  • Qualifying spouses and dependent children.

When applying, the following documentation is required:

  • Veteran’s full name
  • Rank
  • Branch of service
  • SSN
  • VA claim number
  • Date of entry
  • Date of discharge
  • Date of birth
  • Date of death

For more information regarding Hawaii veterans benefits, please visit the Hawaii Office of Veterans Services

Related state military and veteran information:

State Veterans’ Benefits – By State

Hawaii BAH Rates

Yellow Ribbon Schools

Georgia Veterans Benefits & Disabled Veteran Benefits

Georgia State Veteran Benefits

The following are the Georgia veterans’ benefits programs for education, housing, healthcare and employment.

Education Benefits for Georgia Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the State of Georgia.

Georgia HERO Scholarship

The Georgia HERO Scholarship program offers financial assistance to qualifying active duty, Guard, and Reserve members who served in combat zones as well as the spouses and school-age children of qualifying military members.

  • These scholarships are offered on a first-come, first-served basis; those who qualify may receive up to  $2,000 per academic school year for full-time attendance.
  • The scholarship is prorated for part-time study.
  • This benefit is typically capped at $8000 total for four academic years.

Applicants must file a Georgia HERO application within two years of becoming eligible. You must renew the application each academic year.

University System of Georgia Resident Waiver of Mandatory Fees for Combat Vets

Combat vets applying to any University System of Georgia school may qualify for a waiver of all mandatory fees. This waiver cannot be used for housing or elective fees. It is not automatic and must be applied for. Contact the admissions office of the school you are interested in for more details.

Who qualifies for this benefit?

Georgia residents called to active duty and deployed to a combat zone on or after September 11, 2001 who meet the following criteria:

  • The veteran served 90 days in a combat zone.
  • The veteran received full disability as a result of injuries received in the combat zone.
  • The veteran was evacuated from a combat zone.

University System of Georgia Resident Tuition rates for Nonresidents

The University System of Georgia offers resident tuition rates for eligible nonresident service members and veterans, their spouse and dependent children. The requirements include:

  • Being assigned or stationed for military duty in Georgia, OR;
  • Having been previously assigned and still enrolled in a school there.

Other guidelines for approval apply to dependents and spouses including approval for “any student” using VA benefits for education transferred to them by their spouse or parent.

University System of Georgia Military Service Refunds

All schools in the University System of Georgia offer “full refunds” of tuition, mandatory fees and “prorated refunds” of elective fees for qualifying students who serve. There are several qualifying circumstances:

  • Reservists who receive orders to training, active duty or TDY that prevents completion of the school term;
  • Active duty Service members who PCS, go TDY or are ordered to training that interferes with class attendance;
  • Students “significantly affected” by the activation of a Reserve component or deployment and “can show a need for a refund”.

These refunds are not automatic, and must be applied for. Additional criteria may apply depending on circumstances. Contact the admissions office of the school you are attending to learn what is required to claim these refunds.

> Find VA-approved colleges and universities in Georgia with our School Finder. 

Tax Benefits for Georgia Veterans

Extension of Filing Deadline for Combat Deployment

The State of Georgia tax filing deadline is extended for those who are combat deployed–taxpayers typically have 180 days to file after the end of their deployment.

Waived Income Taxes for Those Who Die In A Combat Zone

Georgia law waives state income taxes for those who die in a combat zone.

Georgia Tax Exemption for Military Pay

The State of Georgia offers tax exemptions for qualifying veterans worth up to $35,000, half of which is applied toward military retirement pay. Those who earned a minimum of $17,500 from another source (not military retirement pay) may qualify for an additional $17,500 exemption on Georgia state taxes.

Military disability retirement pay the service member elected to draw as a pension is not considered taxable income. This includes, but may not be limited to:

  • Disability compensation
  • Pension payments for disabilities
  • Qualifying grants for specially adapted homes
  • Qualifying grants for motor vehicles for Veterans

Disabled Veteran Homestead Tax Exemption

Honorably discharged Georgia veterans with disabilities may qualify for a homestead tax exemption on a primary residence. Criteria for this tax exemption includes:

  • The veteran is VA-rated as 100% disabled OR;
  • The veteran is VA-rated less than 100% disabled but is entitled to a 100% rating “due to unemployability” OR;
  • The veteran receives an award from the VA for Loss or permanent loss of use of one or both feet, hands, loss or loss of use of one or both eyes OR;
  • The applicant is a surviving, un-remarried spouse of a qualified veteran OR;
  • The applicant is a surviving minor child of a qualified veteran.

This tax exemption is not automatic and must be applied for. The amount of the exemption may be subject to change year to year. Tax laws change frequently, to determine what is possible in the current year, consult a tax professional.

Georgia Ad Valorem Tax Waiver For Vehicles

Those with VA disability ratings of 100% and veterans who have qualifying injuries (see below) may qualify for a Georgia tax exemption on either title tax or annual property taxes on one vehicle the veteran owns. The vehicle must display a Disabled Veteran license plate to qualify.

Qualifying injuries under this program include but may not be limited to:

  • Loss or permanent loss of use of one or both feet;
  • Loss or permanent loss of use of one or both hands;
  • Loss of sight in one or both eyes;
  • Permanent impairment of vision of both eyes “to a prescribed degree.”
  • Those awarded the Purple Heart or Medal of Honor also qualify.

The state also offers a tax break on the purchase and/or alteration of a vehicle to make it more accessible–those who are awarded a grant by the federal-level Department of Veterans Affairs to purchase a specially adapted vehicle or to adapt a vehicle already owned are exempt from paying the initial sales tax on it.

Another vehicle-related veteran benefit in the State of Georgia allows those who have been deployed and serve in combat zones to get a driving license renewal extension or renewal by mail.

There is also a six-month grace period when a servicemember’s Georgia driving license expires while the member is on duty outside the state.

Georgia State Nursing Home Benefits Veterans

Georgia operates two skilled nursing care homes for qualifying wartime veterans. To qualify you must be a Georgia resident for two years before the application or you must have lived in the state for five or more years “of the past 15 years” according to the State of Georgia.

Applicants must be eligible for skilled nursing care as determined by the Department of Veterans Affairs. They must also be:

  •  “Free of contagious infectious disease” according to the State of Georgia official site;
  • The applicant must also be free of “behavioral and psychiatric problems” according to the State of Georgia official site;
  • The applicant “must not need to be sustained by line-operated mechanical means”.

Qualifying wartime periods include, but may not be limited to:

  • World War II: December 7, 1941 – December 31, 1946
  • Post-World War II: January 1, 1947 – June 26, 1950
  • Korea: June 27, 1950 – January 31, 1955
  • Cold War: January 31, 1955 – August 1, 1990
  • Vietnam: July 1, 1964 – May 7, 1975
  • Persian Gulf: August 2, 1990 – present

Applicants must not have a discharge characterized as Dishonorable.

Employment Benefits for Georgia Veterans

Georgia Business Certification of Exemption For Veterans

Georgia veterans may be eligible for an exemption from occupation taxes, admin fees, or regulatory fees such as those for peddling, operating a business, or “practicing a profession”.

A military discharge under honorable conditions is required, and applicants must have a service-connected disability rating of 10% for wartime vets or 25% for peacetime vets). Applicants also must have income not subject to state income tax.

Georgia Veteran Employment Preference

Qualifying veterans may be eligible to claim a 5-point exam credit for wartime veterans competing for state jobs. A 10-point exam credit is offered to qualifying veterans with a VA service-connected disability rating of 10% or more.

More information regarding Georgia veterans benefits can be found at the Georgia Department of Veterans Service official site

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Florida Veteran & Disabled Veteran Benefits

Florida Military Benefits

The following are the Florida military benefits programs for education, housing, healthcare, and employment. You can also learn about veterans’ benefits in other states.

Education Benefits for Veterans in Florida

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the states.

Florida State Education Benefits For Spouses and Dependents

Florida offers education benefits for qualifying spouses and dependent children of veterans who died from a service connected disability. This option may also be available to those who are spouses or dependents of veterans who are MIA, POWs, or 100% percent service-connected, permanently disabled. Florida residency is also a requirement.

Military spouses and school-age dependent children are also offered priority registration at certain Florida colleges if they attend using GI Bill benefits.

RELATED: Tuition Assistance for Service Members

Florida Purple Heart Waiver

Florida waives undergraduate-level tuition at state universities, community colleges, and career and technical training facilities for Florida recipients of the Purple Heart and other awards. Those who have earned any of the following may qualify:

  • Purple Heart
  • Bronze Star with “V” device
  • Distinguished Flying Cross
  • Legion of Merit with “V” device
  • Silver Star
  • Air Force Cross
  • Navy Cross
  • Distinguished Service Cross
  • Medal of Honor

The Purple Heart Waiver covers tuition and fees required for a degree or certificate program from the Florida College System for up to 110% of the program requirement..

The Purple Heart Waiver doesn’t cover costs like textbooks, housing, and food. Students can study either full-time or part-time. When you apply for this waiver you must furnish both proof of service and proof of the award or decoration.

Find Your Fit with GI Bill-approved Schools in Florida! Get Started

Academic Credit For Military Experience

Florida state-supported colleges and universities may allow currently serving military members and veterans to earn college credit for military training and education, if those programs meet Florida state standards.

Guidelines for acceptability may vary depending on the college and other variables, and each institution of higher learning may have its own standards on what transfers and what does not.

You may be required to furnish military education transcripts, any diplomas earned from entities like the Community College of the Air Force, and any certificates earned from advanced individual training.

Contact the admissions office of the college you wish to attend to learn more about that school’s procedures for reviewing military experience.

The State of Florida Educational Dollars for Duty (EDD) Program

Educational Dollars for Duty pays up to 100 percent of public tuition at Florida colleges and may offer to cover private tuition at qualifying Florida colleges (payment is set at the average Florida state school rate).

This Florida military education benefits program is offered to members of the Florida National Guard and can be used for traditional college, vocational school, professional licenses, and examinations required by certain industries. You must register for this program using your DS logon as a member of the National Guard.

Need ways to pay for college?  Search scholarships for military, veterans, spouses and dependents with the CollegeRecon Scholarship Finder.

Tax Exemptions For Florida Veterans

The State of Florida offers a variety of tax breaks for veterans and spouses. Some of these tax breaks are for specific classes of veterans such as those with a VA disability rating. Others may be offered to all Florida veterans who meet program criteria for residency or other factors.

Florida Tax Exemption For Qualifying Disabled Veterans

Florida veterans who are confined to a wheelchair or who are totally disabled may qualify for a 100% exemption from Florida property taxes on a primary residence. This also applies to un-remarried surviving spouses of veterans who qualify.

The Florida Department of Revenue processes the applications for this Florida veteran tax break, you will need to submit applications to that department and NOT the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs.

Tax laws are subject to revision from year to year. What is allowed in the current tax year may be modified for next year’s tax season. Always consult a tax professional to learn what your current military-related tax breaks may be.

Another program is the State of Florida tax break for disabled veterans ages 65 and older. This is offered to those who have a permanent VA-rated service connected “partial” disability.

  • Like some other Florida property tax programs, this option does not forgive the full amount of your property taxes for a primary residence.
  • The tax break offered to qualifying applicants is the same percentage as the veteran’s VA disability rating.
  • Surviving Spouses may qualify for the discount if they do not remarry.
  • The Florida Department of Revenue processes the applications for this Florida veteran tax break, you will need to submit applications to that department and NOT the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs.

Florida Property Tax Exemptions For Disabled Wartime Veterans

Similar to the tax break listed above, for this benefit, qualifying veterans with a VA-rated combat disability of 10% or more may qualify for a tax break on property taxes for primary residences.

  • This tax break is a partial exemption only, it does not provide 100% tax relief in typical cases.
  • Veterans and surviving spouses may apply for this tax break, which is “equal to” the veteran’s VA disability rating percentage.
  • The Florida Department of Revenue accepts applications for this tax advantage, not the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs.

As always, keep in mind that tax laws are subject to frequent change–what applies this year may be modified for next year’s tax season depending on any number of variables.

Florida Property Tax Exemptions for Those Deployed or Who Died On Active Duty

Military members may qualify for a Florida property tax exemption (primary residences only) if they were deployed in the previous calendar year. For the purposes of this tax relief, “deployment” is defined as:

  • Duty occurred outside the continental U.S., Alaska, and Hawaii.
  • Duty was in support of a military operation “designated by the Florida Legislature”.
  • The amount of the tax break is equal to the percentage of time the servicemember spent on deployment.

Surviving spouses of military members who died on active duty may also qualify for a full Florida property tax exemption. This is for primary residences only, and those who qualify for the benefit may be allowed to claim it before official documentation from the U.S. government is available to the applicant. The tax exemption is effective as of the date of the original application paperwork.

>> Interested in housing in or near Florida? For a no-obligation, free consultation regarding your VA Loan eligibility, please go here.

Housing Benefits for Florida Veterans

Salute Our Soldiers Program

The Florida Housing Finance Corporation offers a program called Salute our Soldiers. Aimed at currently serving military members and veterans alike, this is a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage program featuring down payment assistance for primary residences only. This program is administered through a network of participating lenders and you are required to attend a first-time homebuyer’s course.

Hometown Heroes Home Loan Program

The Florida Housing Finance Corporation also offers the Hometown Heroes Housing Program offers affordable home loans with down payment assistance and closing cost assistance for first-time home buyers in qualifying occupations including military service. Those eligible to apply are those considered to be frontline workers including police, fire, hospital, and military responders.

This program offers “lower-than-market rates” options for government-backed mortgages including the VA, FHA, USDA, and conventional mortgages. There are reduced out-of-pocket costs, no origination points, and the following features:

  • Qualifying applicants may be offered up to 5% of the first mortgage loan amount (maximum of $25,000) in down payment assistance and closing cost help.
  • Down payment and closing cost assistance is offered as a zero-interest, non-amortizing, 30-year deferred second mortgage.
  • The second mortgage becomes due when the property is sold or transferred.
  • The second loan is also payable if the borrower stops using the home as a primary residence.
  • The Florida Hometown Heroes loan is not a forgivable loan.

>> Interested in housing in or near Florida? For a no-obligation, free consultation regarding your VA Loan eligibility, please go here.

Healthcare Benefits for Florida Veterans

The following are healthcare benefits for veterans and active duty service members in Florida.

Florida State Veterans’ Homes

The Florida Department of Veterans Affairs official site notes that the agency (at press time) operates eight skilled nursing facilities and one assisted living facility, all licensed and inspected annually. An Honorable discharge is required for admission, and you must be a Florida resident and have a medical need for assisted or skilled care.

These facilities are located throughout the state:

  • Robert H. Jenkins Jr. Veterans’ Domiciliary Home in Lake City
  • Emory L. Bennett State Veterans’ Nursing Home in Daytona Beach
  • Baldomero Lopez State Veterans’ Nursing Home in Land O’ Lakes
  • Alexander “Sandy” Nininger State Veterans’ Nursing Home in Pembroke Pines
  • Clifford C. Sims State Veterans’ Nursing Home in Panama City
  • Douglas T. Jacobson State Veterans’ Nursing Home in Port Charlotte
  • Clyde E. Lassen State Veterans’ Nursing Home in St. Augustine
  • Ardie R. Copas State Veterans’ Nursing Home in Port St. Lucie

Employment Benefits for Florida Veterans

The following are employment benefits for veterans who live in Florida.

Florida Service-Disabled Veteran Business Enterprise Opportunity

The State of Florida offers bidding and proposal preference when “at least one of the bids is from a certified service-disabled Veteran business enterprise”. In cases where a bid or proposal is offered by a service-disabled veteran that is equal to another submitted by a non-service-disabled vet, the government “shall award such procurement or contract to the certified service-disabled veteran business enterprise” according to the State of Florida.

Employment Preference

Florida offers hiring preference to qualifying veterans and spouses for state jobs and “all political subdivisions of the state”. The state adds that certain higher education requirements for certain positions may be waived for “certain ‎service members and veterans”. Qualifying criteria includes, but may not be limited to the following:

  1. Wartime veterans who served at least one day during a wartime period.
  2. A VA-rated disabled veteran with an Honorable discharge, “who is receiving compensation, disability retirement benefits, or pension” from the VA and DoD.
  3. The spouse of a veteran who has a total, permanent service-connected disability who “cannot qualify for employment”, as well as spouses of those listed as missing in action, captured in line of duty, or forcibly detained in line of duty by a foreign government or power.
  4. The un-remarried surviving spouse of a veteran who died of a service-connected disability.
  5. The mother, father, legal guardian, or un-remarried surviving spouse of someone who died in the line of duty “under combat-related conditions”.
  6. A current member of the Guard or Reserve in Florida.

Other requirements may apply. State hiring preference is not necessarily done on a points system, but accommodations are made for hiring programs that are based on such a system.

Business License Fee Waivers for Veterans and Their Spouses

The Department of Business and Professional Regulation allows qualifying military members and spouses to apply for business licenses without an initial licensing fee, application fee, and unlicensed activity fee. This waiver may not apply for subsequent applications, and the number of licenses available under this program may be limited. There is also a time limit to apply–you must submit your application no later than 60 months after discharge.

Health License Fee Waivers for Veterans and Their Spouses

The Florida Department of Health provides expedited healthcare licensure for qualifying veterans and spouses via the Veterans Application for Licensure Online Response System. There are also options for “expanded licensure fee waivers” for those seeking healthcare licenses in the state. According to a press release about the program issued by the state, “Veterans and spouses who apply through the VALOR process receive a waiver of most licensing fees”.

Agriculture and Consumer Services Fee Waivers

The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services allows veterans and spouses to apply for waivers on first-time licensing application fees for ag-based businesses “where the veteran or spouse has a majority ownership stake”.

Florida State Military Death Benefits

The State of Florida will pay qualifying surviving family members a death benefit in certain cases. For all such benefits, the veteran must have been a Florida resident, or military duty must have required the veteran to serve in the State of Florida.

  • $75,000 paid by the state “if a member of the United States Armed Forces, while on active duty and engaged in the performance of his or her official duties, is killed or receives a bodily injury that results in the loss of the member’s life” that is not self-inflicted.
  • $25,000 paid when the servicemember, while on active duty, “is killed other than as specified” above but not as a result of self-inflicted injury.
  • Payment of these benefits is given to a beneficiary the service member identifies ahead of time.
  • The State of Florida advises that in cases where “no such designation is made”, payments must be paid to the member’s surviving child or children and/or to his or her surviving spouse “in equal portions”, or to the veteran’s parents, or to the servicemember’s estate.

For more information regarding Florida veterans benefits, see the Florida Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

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