Federal Law Enforcement Jobs at the Department of Justice

Federal Law Enforcement Jobs at the Justice Department

Given that leadership, integrity, teamwork, and dedication are all traits shared by military personnel; it seems a no-brainer that law enforcement is one of the most common civilian career paths taken by former military service members.

Depending on your branch of service, you likely already have many of the basic skills needed in law enforcement such as weapons handling, crowd management, risk assessment, and the use-of-force or rules of engagement. But those skills are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to Federal law enforcement.

Why Federal Law Enforcement?

Nearly every agency and department within the Federal Government actively seek to hire Veterans for law enforcement roles. This is especially true of the Department of Justice law enforcement agencies like the FBI, U.S. Marshals, and the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BoP).

Special Hiring Rules for Veterans

Many of the educational and experience requirements may be waived for military veteran candidates. In addition, as a veteran, you are given priority for many federal jobs, especially in the case of federal law enforcement given that your training, experience and learned skills translate well into the law enforcement field.

If you are eligible, you can also apply for Veterans’ Preference Points. To learn more about Veterans’ Preference, click here.

Visit FedsHireVets.gov for more information on benefits for veterans and service members.

FBI Career Opportunities

The FBI’s priority is to investigate a wide range of crimes like terrorism, espionage, cybercrimes, corruption, organized crime, street gangs, child predators, and serial killers.

As a veteran you may apply for any of the jobs at the FBI, from Special Agent to any of the professional positions, like forensics, accounting, information technology/cybersecurity, surveillance, intelligence analysis, and more. There are two main career paths within the FBI. The best known is Operations & Intelligence, which is most often seen in movies and TV shows. See details on these FBI career opportunities.

U.S. Marshal Career Opportunities

The U.S. Marshals Service (USMS) was founded in 1789 making it the oldest federal law enforcement agency in the U.S.. The USMS work often goes unseen by the general public, except in films and TV. The Marshals main role is centered on supporting the federal justice system.

The USMS central role is as the enforcement arm of the federal courts. U.S. Marshals serve in 94 federal judicial districts. Deputy Marshals and Criminal Investigators are the foundation of the USMS; their roles include capturing federal fugitives, securing the federal court system, operating the Witness Security Program (WitSec), and transporting prisoners. See details on these career opportunities.

Federal Bureau of Prisons Career Opportunities

The Federal Bureau of Prisons’ (BoP) mission is to protect our communities by operating our federal prisons and ensuring the prisons are safe, humane, cost-efficient, and appropriately secure.

There are four main career areas within the Federal Bureau of Prisons – Inmate Custody & Programs, Health Services, Careers in Operational, Careers in Support & Administration. This means that as a veteran you can choose from several career paths, including several that do not deal directly with inmates. See details on these career opportunities.

If you are interested in finding a Federal job in law enforcement, you can start at the Dept. of Justice Veteran Recruitment website.

 

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10 Step Guide to Going to College for Military & Veterans

Your military career is coming to an end, you can see your ETS date approaching and have been thinking about what you want to do after this chapter ends. Or, you are a military spouse, your kids are all school age now, and you want to start focusing on your own career.

What about going back to school? Or maybe you never had the chance to start in the first place?

Going to College: 10 Step Guide

If this is something you have thought about, here is a 10-step guide for going to college:

Step 1: Should you go back to school?

The first question you have to answer is if you should go back to school in the first place. Ask yourself why you would want to go to school, what you would do, and what you going back to school would look like for your family.

  • Will you need to find childcare for the kids?
  • How long will it take you to finish?
  • What would your end goal be?

Once you figure out that you actually do want to go back to school, you can move on to step 2.

RELATED: Why Stop at an Associate’s Degree?

Step 2: Where should you go to school?

You now need to decide where you are going to go to school. Here are some factors that can go into deciding where you should go to school:

  • Where you live
  • If you want to go to school online or not
  • What your military installation offers
  • What program you want to go into
  • What the class schedules are like
  • What the rating of the schools you can choose from are
  • If you can move to a new city or not
  • Are they one of the military friendly colleges?

The best thing to do is look at all of your options, make a list of pros and cons, talk to your spouse if you have one, and come up with the best plan for your education.

 

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Step 3: Time to apply for college

Applications for colleges can seem a bit overwhelming. The most important thing is to know exactly what you need to send in and when the application deadlines are.

Make a list of everything you need to do, from filling out paperwork, to writing an essay if that is required. Each school will have its own specific dates and never assume you know what they are based on past experience.

If you do have questions about the application process you can always talk to someone in the admissions department at the school you would like to attend.

In today’s world, you should be able to complete your applications online, making the process a little easier than applying for college used to be.

Step 4: Send in those transcripts

As a part of the application process, you need to figure out if you will have to send in any transcripts. If you have taken college classes in the past, this will be a must.

Colleges will also most likely want to see your high school transcripts. Most schools will want them sent directly from the school, not from you. Sending in your transcripts will let you know what you still need to take and what will apply towards the new program you are going towards.

For example, if you want to get into an RN nursing program, but you have an AA degree from another college or university, you can probably transfer some of those classes and not have to take as many prerequisites as you if you didn’t have that educational experience in your background.

In order to send your transcripts, you will need to contact your previous schools. Some will have an online form that you can fill out, or will have you go through a 3rd party to get those sent. There could also be schools that are more old-fashioned when it comes to your transcripts and you might have to send in a letter requesting them. Talk to the school you want to attend to find out the exact address they need to be sent to and make sure to follow up so you know that they have received them.

If you are a service member, you can also submit your Joint Services Transcript (JST) or your Community College of the Air Force Transcript (CCAF) which will show your military service and training allowing you to receive college credit based on your time and what you learned by serving in the military. These transcripts are official records and more than 2,300 colleges and universities will accept them.

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Step 5: FAFSA

FAFSA is federal financial aid for students. No matter who you are, it would be a good idea to apply. You can use FAFSA with the GI Bill and you can use FAFSA with MYCAA. With FAFSA, the money you receive can be in the form of grants, scholarships, or unsubsidized or subsidized loans. What you receive will depend on the need-based and non-need based aspects of your application. You can apply for FAFSA on their website.

Step 6: Using the GI Bill and MYCAA

The GI Bill has been helping veterans in some form, since 1944. Today, with the Post 9/11 GI Bill, veterans can have their education paid for, as well as receiving money for books, and even a GI Bill Housing Benefit. Service members can transfer their GI Bill to their spouse or even their child and allow them to use this benefit. There is also still the option of using the Montgomery GI Bill which is a slightly different educational benefit.

MYCAA is for military spouses that qualify for this benefit. Spouses can receive $2,000 a year, for two years for certain educational programs and degrees. In order to qualify a spouse will need to be married to an active duty service member in the ranks of E-1 through E-5, W-1 through W-2, or O-1 through O-2. They will also need to have completed high school, and have a spouse on Title 10 orders. National Guard and Reservist spouses can qualify if their spouse goes on active duty.

Step 7: Now that you are accepted to college

After you send in your application, you might have to wait a bit before you hear that you are accepted to the college you want to go to. Once you hear from all the colleges you have applied for,  you will need to make your decision.

There might be one school that you wanted to go to above others, and in that case, you don’t have to decide anything. You just need to let the school know you do plan to attend there. If you got into more than one school that you would like to go to, you will have to make a decision.

Again, you should go back over the pros and cons of each school, what they can offer you, and what would be best for your own personal situation as well as educational goals.

Step 8: Know your dates

After you have decided on the school you are going to attend, make sure you know the dates for everything you will need to do moving forward. You will have to turn in certain paperwork and there will be things you have to do when it comes to financial aid. You could have an orientation you have to attend, you might need to meet with an advisor, and you should figure out what you have to do in order to sign up for your classes on time.

Having a separate calendar just for school deadlines and dates would be a good idea. Staying organized is a must. You don’t want to miss out on something or miss an important deadline.

Step 9: You need supplies

Before your first day of class, you need to make sure you have all the supplies you need to have a good school year. The number one supply you are going to have to buy is your textbooks. Most schools let you search for your textbooks based on what classes you are taking.

If you have the Post 9/11 GI Bill you will receive $1,000 per year for supplies. You can use this money for textbooks or other supplies you might need. You can also find cheap ways to buy textbooks using different sources such as searching comparable websites or buying used.

You might need a new computer for your schooling as well as basic supplies such as folders, notebooks, pens and pencils. Also, make sure that you are aware of any extra expenses that can come from different classes or programs and budget for those purchases as well.

Step 10: First day of school

 Eventually, it will be time to start your first day of school. If you are attending classes in person, going on a trial run before your first day would be a good idea. That way, you can figure out parking, and where your classes will be. You don’t want to be wandering around campus, unsure of where to go, on the first day of school.

Most of all, enjoy your journey. Whether you are going to college for the first time, or going back to get an advanced degree. Going back to school can be stressful, but being organized will help you go a long way.

If you have an education center on post, that can be a good place to start if you are unsure of what you want to do in the future. There are many options for service members, veterans, and spouses who are looking for ways to further their education and career goals.

 

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DoD MOU: What You Need to Know

As a service member, you want to find a veteran or military friendly school to go to. You want to make sure they have your best interests as a service member in mind when you are going to their school. How do you determine this? How do you know if your school is one of the veteran and military friendly colleges? One way is the DoD MOU.

What is the DoD MOU?

The DoD Voluntary Education Partnership Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is between the DoD Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness and educational institutions. If a school wants to receive DoD military tuition assistance, they must agree to the Voluntary Education Partnership Memorandum of Understanding.

How many schools and institutions are on the participant’s list?

There are 2,772 main institutions and 11,149 total additional locations. You can see what these are on this list on the DoD MOU website.

TA Decide

Another way to find out information about educational institutions is using TA Decide. This is an information and comparison tool to help TA participants make informed choices on schools and educational programs.

The TA Decide program is fueled by more than ten recognized and trusted data sources from across the departments of Defense, Education, and Veterans Affairs. It is also uniquely tailored to each TA participant.

Within TA Decide you can search your school directly, or search by state/territory, accreditation type, school type, learning method, programs, or degree level. You can also compare different schools that are in the database.

DoD Voluntary Education Partnership MOU Eligibility

To be eligible, an educational institution must:

  • Be accredited by a national or regional accrediting body that is recognized by the Department of Education (ED.) They need to conduct programs that are only from among those offered or authorized by the main administrative and academic office in accordance with standard procedures for authorization of degree programs by the educational institution.
  • Be state-approved for the use of veterans education benefits, such as the Post-9/11 GI Bill.
  • Be certified to participate in the federal student aid programs through the Department of Education under Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965. This certification can be provisional if the educational institution maintains eligibility to participate in the Federal Direct Loan Program.
  • Must comply with state authorization requirements that are consistent with regulations issued by ED, which includes, 34 C.F.R. 600.9. The educational institutions must meet all of the state laws as they relate to distance education.
  • Must comply with 34 C.F.R.600.9 (a) and (b). The DoD also recognizes any additional rules ED provides for delayed implementation.
  • Title IV participants must obtain an Office of Post-secondary Education Identification (OPE ID) number that is issued by the Department of Education. This is to help identify schools that have PPA (Program Participation Agreements) so that students are eligible to participate in the Federal Student Financial Assistance programs under the Title IV regulations.

What information does the TA Decide tool show us?

You can gain a lot of good and in-depth information when you are using the TA Decide tool. Here is some information about what’s in the tool:

School Details

There will be school information such as the school’s address, website, source of accreditation, accreditation type, school type, DoD MOU point of contact, and number of DoD TA participants.

Federal Beneficiaries and Funds

Here you will find the number of those using TA and the costs, the number using the Post 9/11 GI Bill and the costs, as well as information about those getting Federal Student Aid.

Programs and Offerings

This section will have the learning methods available, information on Service members Opportunity Colleges, types of degrees, and subjects you can receive the degrees in.

Cost of Attendance

Here you will find information on tuition rates, fees, books and supplies, and room and board.

DoD Tuition Assistance (TA) Information

In this section, you will find more information about Tuition Assistance including how many courses are funded by TA and the school’s TA course completion rate.

Department of Education Information

Here you will find Department of Education information such as ED composite scores and information from College Navigator Institution Data such as enrollment numbers.

Complaint Information

This area will have any complaints that have been filed by service members and their families about their educational experience at that school.

School Eligibility

Under this category, you will see if the school has signed the DoD Memorandum of Understanding (MOU,) if they have agreed on the Principles of Excellence, if they have the Yellow Ribbon program and if they have agreed with the 8 Keys to Veterans Success.

The Comparison Tool

When you compare more than one school, you can get a sense of how similar or different they are. You can find out how much TA pays per course, compared to the DoD average. You can also see what your chances are of passing your course, also compared to the DoD average. There is also information about the percentage of military graduates, and how long it takes to graduate.

As a service member, you will want to find a school that has what you are looking for, has signed the DoD MOU, and that will be friendly to veterans and members of the military. Using TA Decide and checking to see if your school is on the participant’s list is a great way to find that school or to know that the school you are attending qualifies.

 

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Navy Federal Member Benefits & Perks

Member Benefits for Navy Federal Credit Union

As a military member, you can find different benefits out there for you and your family because of your military service. When it comes to banking, you have a lot of choices, but Navy Federal Credit Union is made for service members and provide a lot of benefits from banking to buying a new car. Here is a little bit about Navy Federal Credit Union benefits and perks that may be available to you.

List of NFCU Benefits

  • Unofficially, NFCU stands for Navy Federal Credit Union and was originally incorporated in 1933 as the Navy Department Employees’ Credit Union of the District of Columbia.
  • They have gone through many changes over the years and were only open to Navy personnel until 2008 when they opened up to the entire Department of Defense, to include members of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force as well as civilian personnel within the Department of Defense. In 2013, they were also opened to the Coast Guard.
  • Navy Federal has 7.5 million members and is the largest natural member or retail credit union in the United States.
  • They are open to all service members, to include the national guard and reserves, DOD Officer candidates, veterans, retirees, annuitants, DOD civilians, as well as family members. These include grandparents, parents, spouses, siblings, children, grandchildren, and household members.
  • They offer a lot of similar services that USAA does, including banking, special offers, and loans. However, compared to USAA, they tend to have more generous loan terms as well as more physical bank locations.
  • They also offer perks and discounts, military pay advances, and easy direct deposit.
  • You can receive your military paycheck a day early.

RELATED: Navy Federal Pay Dates

  • Since they are a credit union, as a member you will become part owner and have a say in the future of the company. They will also pay out dividends.
  • They offer free checking accounts, and they also refund ATM fees up to $20 per statement period on their free active duty checking accounts. Their Free Active Duty Checking account was made for active duty life which is a huge plus.

As you can see, there are many Navy Federal Credit Union benefits and perks just for joining.  When choosing where to bank, keep these things in mind as you are trying to decide where it would be best to go.

As far as deciding if Navy Federal Credit Union is right for you, that will depend on what you are looking for in a financial institution, what types of products you plan to use, and who you trust to keep your money safe. Just know that they will offer you and your family amazing benefits if you decide to go with them.

 

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Hazlewood Act – What is it, Qualifying, & Applying for Texas Veterans

The state of Texas has their own way to help those who have served in the military pay for college, it’s called the Hazlewood Act. This act was named for the Texas senator, Grady Hazlewood. He led the passage of many amendments to the act in 1944 to help veterans. It dates back to 1929 to help nurses and veterans without other benefits and has evolved from there.

Texas’ Hazlewood Act

Here is some information about the Hazlewood Act and how it can help veterans and possibly their families pay for college.

What is the Hazlewood Act?

If you qualify for the Hazlewood Act, you will be exempt from paying your tuition and most fees, up to 150 semester credit hours.

You will need to be enrolled in classes at a public institution of higher education in the state of Texas.

You also can not use this for property deposits, student service fees, books, supplies, and living expenses.

  • The Hazlewood Act is not based on financial need.
  • You can use the Hazlewood Act for undergraduate and graduate school, including law school. You can also use it for distance learning if the classes you are taking receive formula funding and you are taking these classes through a Public Texas institution.
  • As far as continuing education classes without formula funding go, institutions are not required to offer Hazlewood Act benefits to veterans enrolled in them. However, the college or university may choose to permit this option.

Who Qualifies for the Hazlewood Act?

Veterans

  • In order to qualify, at the time you started your active duty military service, you must have designated Texas as your home of record, entered the service in Texas, or had been a Texas resident.
  • You also need to have had an honorable discharge or separation or a general discharge under honorable conditions as indicated on the your certificate of release or discharge from active duty.
  • You need to have served at least 181 days of active duty service, not including training.
  • You can use your Federal VA Education benefits as long as they are not the Post-9/11 GI Bill (chapter 33) or Vocational Rehabilitation Education program benefits (chapter 31) as well as any other benefits designed only for payment of tuition and fees. However, if you are receiving Federal VA Education benefits for payment of tuition and fees, you may receive both benefits if the Federal VA Education benefit amount does not equal or exceed the Hazlewood exemption value. If this is the case, you may receive a Hazlewood exemption that equals the difference between the total tuition and fees and the federal benefits.
  • Basically, you would not be able to use the Post-9/11 GI Bill with the Hazlewood Act unless you do not qualify for the full amount of the Post-9/11 GI Bill.
  • You will need to currently reside in Texas.
  • You can not be in default on a student loan made or guaranteed by the state of Texas.
  • You will need to be enrolled in classes for which the college or university receives tax support unless the college’s governing board has ruled to allow veterans to receive the benefit while taking non-funded courses.
  • You also will need to meet the GPA requirements of the institution’s satisfactory academic progress policy. This will have to be in a degree or certificate program, as determined by the institution’s financial aid policy. Also, as an undergraduate student, you can not be considered to have attempted an excessive amount of credit hours.

Children of Veterans under the Legacy Act

Veterans who are eligible for the Hazlewood Act may assign or transfer unused hours of exemption eligibility to a child under certain circumstances.

  • The child must be classified by the institution as a resident of Texas.
  • They must be the biological child, stepchild, adopted child, or claimed as a dependent in the current or previous year.
  • They must be 25 years old or younger on the 1st day of the semester or term for when the exemption is claimed. There are some cases when they can receive an extension due to a qualifying illness or debilitating condition.
  • They must also meet the GPA requirements of the institutions/ satisfactory academic progress as listed above in the veteran’s section.

Spouses and Dependent children

  • Spouses and dependent children of active duty, reserve, and Texas National Guard who died in the line of duty, or as a result of an injury or illness directly related to military service, or who are missing in action, or became disabled for purposes of employability as a result of a service-related injury or illness are able to receive an 150 credit hour exemption with the Hazlewood Act as well.
  • A spouse must be the spouse of a veteran, who at the time of entry into the military, was classified by the institution as a Texas resident, had a designated Texas Home of Record, or entered the service in Texas. The same goes for a dependent child.
  • The same rules about Federal Veterans Education benefits that apply to veterans also apply to the spouse and dependent child.
  • Spouses and dependent children also need to be classified by the institution as a Texas resident.
  • The GPA requirements listed for the veteran also apply for the spouse and dependent child except in the case that the spouse or child is a spouse or child of a service member who is missing in action, killed in action, or is a service-connected deceased veteran.

Miscellaneous Hazlewood Act Information

  • The institution that the veteran, spouse or child attends exempts the cost of tuition and fees. No money will change hands.
  • The governing board of each institution shall report to the Texas Veterans Commission. They will give them any information relating to each individual receiving an exemption from tuition and fees through the Hazlewood Act.
  • Remember that there are strict rules for what makes you eligible as far as being a Texas resident goes. It simply isn’t enough that you lived in Texas once, that you have done so in the past, or that you want to do so in the future.

How Do You Apply for the Hazlewood Act?

You would need to register with the Hazlewood Act online database to get started.

As you can see, the Hazlewood Act can save you money on your schooling and allow you to fulfill your dreams. If you qualify, you should make sure to check out this fantastic benefit for you and possibly your children.

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National Guard & Reserve Tuition Assistance

National Guard Tuition Assistance and Reserve Tuition Assistance

If you are serving in the National Guard or Reserves, you might be wondering if there is a National Guard Tuition Assistance (TA) program or Reserve Tuition Assistance program available to you.

There are Tuition Assistance programs for all five branches of the military, with their own service-specific criteria. There are also TA programs for the Army National Guard, Air National Guard, and some Reserves branches.

Army National Guard Tuition Assistance

  • If you are serving in the Army National Guard you can receive FTA, Federal Tuition Assistance.
  • You can qualify for FTA if you are currently serving in the National Guard, and as of August 5th, 2018, have completed AIT. Previously, you needed to wait a year after AIT to qualify.
  • FTA will fund up to $250 per semester hour, up to 16 semester hours each fiscal year.
  • The lifetime limits would be 130 for undergraduate semester hours, 39 for graduate semester hours, and 21 for certificate or diploma semester hours.
  • The college or university that you go to must be regionally or nationally accredited and a GoArmyEd participant.
  • Federal Tuition Assistance will pay for one credential at each level, which includes getting a certificate/diploma, associate’s degree, bachelor’s degree, master’s degree or graduate level certificate. They will not pay for doctorate degrees.
  • You also may not use FTA to achieve a lower level or lateral level degree or diploma. The purpose is to help you move forward in your education.
  • FTA is for tuition only, not for fees or other expenses outside of the official degree plan.
  • You will need to contact your state’s education services office to find out if you are eligible for Federal Tuition Assistance.
  • If you are eligible for FTA, you would start your application process by creating a GoArmyEd You will need to have this submitted and approved through the GoArmyEd site prior to the course start date.
  • Your FTA request needs to be course by course, not just a blanket request for all of your classes.
  • GoArmyEd will notify you whether your FTA is approved, if not they will advise you on what to do next.

Air National Guard

You can receive TA benefits through serving in the Air National Guard. Make sure to check out your state’s specific educational benefits to know what you would qualify for. You can also work towards your associate’s degree through the Community College of the Air Force.

Tuition Assistance for the Reserves

The branches that offer Reserves TA do usually stay within these guidelines:

  • Up to 100% coverage for tuition, up to $250 per semester hour, or $166 per quarter hour. Up to $4,500 per fiscal year
  • Must be a reservist in good standing
  • Need to declare an educational goal by the 9th credit hour for the USAFR and by the 15th for the USAR
  • Must work towards an educational goal higher than what you already have.
  • Need to be able to complete your course under your current term of service or reenlist (for enlisted and warrant officers,) or have at least four years left of remaining service from the date of your course completion (for commissioned officers.)

The Navy Reserves and the Marine Corps Reserves do not have a tuition assistance program at this time. However, if you get called to active duty, you will fall under the Federal Tuition Assistance program of your active duty counterparts during your activation period.

The Army Reserve Tuition Assistance

For those going for a bachelor’s degree, the Reserve Tuition Assistance program will pay for 75% of tuition costs, up to $250 per semester hour, $166 per credit hour, with the $4,500 annual fiscal cap. To apply, you would need to submit your Tuition Assistance application online through GoArmyEd.

The Air Force Reserve Tuition Assistance

For undergraduates, they offer TA at the DOD guidelines. For master’s degrees, funding is limited to 75% of those guidelines. If you are interested in an associate’s degree and going through the Community College of the Air Force, you will be exempt from the progressive education level requirement. You can apply for TA by going to the Air Force Reserve Portal website.

The Coast Guard Reserve Tuition Assistance

In order to receive TA benefits through the Coast Guard, you will need to be a reservist on long term active duty orders of over 180 days. Back to back tours will not count. The Coast Guard also has an annual fiscal year cap of $2,250 which is lower than other branches.

If you are serving in the National Guard or the Reserves, make sure to find out if you qualify for Tuition Assistance. If you do, make sure to apply in a timely manner in order to receive TA for your education.

 

TUITION ASSISTANCE:

 

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National Guard Pay vs. Army Reserves Pay

National Guard Pay and Reserve Pay

If you are thinking about joining the National Guard or the Reserves, you might be wondering how National Guard pay or Reserve pay works.

Serving in the National Guard and Reserves can be quite different than serving in the active duty military. You have your monthly drills, your annual training, and anything else the military calls you to do. You also work a civilian job, and the military is only a small part of your paycheck.

As an active duty soldier, you know you can receive base pay, BAH (Basic Allowance for Housing), and other types of payments and allowances.

How do things work for the National Guard and Reserves? How about if you deploy or train for more than a weekend? Will you still receive BAH if you are gone for three weeks?

National Guard Pay and Reserve Pay

Your pay as a National Guard or Reservist is determined by your rank, job, and time in service.

You will always get paid when you train. When you work for the military, you will receive some type of military pay.

What about drill pay and weekend drills?

  • Weekend drills can be anywhere from 1-4 days long, depending on what is going on, what is needed and even the budget. Usually, you can count on training on Saturday and Sunday with a possible Friday or Monday as well. They will be at your local armory or another location. If you live near a military installation, you might even go there for training.
  • Each year, you can figure out how much you will get paid during your drill weekends by checking out the military pay charts here. For example, in 2018, an E-5 with 8+ years would make $104.19 for 1 drill, $416.76 for 4 drills. An O-7 with 16+ years would make $392.73 for 1 drill, $1,570.92 for 4 drills.
  • You need to know that 1 drill period is 4 hours. On a typical weekend, you would work 4 drill periods. So that E-5 would earn $416.76 for a regular, two day drill weekend.
  • You are not given any BAH for a drill weekend.
  • You should receive your pay for your drill weekend, about 10 days after the weekend is over, give or take.

What about Annual Training (AT)?

  • AT is annual training and happens once a year, for about two or three weeks. During this time, your base pay would be the same as your active duty counterpart with the same rank and time in service. This will, of course, be prorated for the time that you are away on training.
  • If you’re gone for less than 30 days, you will receive what is called Basic Allowance for Housing Reserve Component/Transient, or BAH II. This is not the same as BAH, what an active duty service member would receive.
  • BAH II pays less than what BAH I would pay. It is also not based on your location but instead on rank, if you have dependents or not, and on the national average for housing. The E-5 with dependents would earn $948.30, the 0-7 with dependents would earn $2050.80. This number is also prorated. If you are gone for three weeks, you will receive three weeks worth of BAH II, not the full amount.
  • You can pull up these rates on the military pay charts here as well.
  • If you happen to be gone for more than 30 days, you would then receive BAH I. This is a change as it used to be that you had to be gone 140 days to qualify.

What happens when I deploy?

  • When you deploy, you are being activated and will receive pay as if you were on active duty. This will include pays such as BAH, Family Separation Pay, Hostile Fire/Imminent Danger Pay, Hardship Duty Pay, Hazardous Duty Pay, Foreign Language Proficiency Pay, BAS (Basic Allowance for Subsistence,) and all of your pay while deployed will be tax-exempt.
  • Of course, what you receive when you deploy will depend on where you are going, how long you are there, and what you qualify for.

What about TRICARE?

  • As far as TRICARE goes, you will have to pay a monthly fee unless you are activated to serve on active duty. When that happens, you can qualify for the same TRICARE that your active duty counterpart does.
  • If you are not activated, you would need to sign up for TRICARE Reserve Select, and the cost would be $221.38 per month for the service member and their family, $46.09 for just the service member. While you do have to pay for this, the cost is very affordable and less than what you would probably pay through your civilian employer.

Anything else I need to know about National Guard and Reserves Pay?

There are also over 60 special and incentive military pays that you may or may not qualify for. If you do extra training, you can also earn more money from doing so.

Remember, every time you are working for the military, you will receive a military paycheck. If you are trying to learn more about how much money you would make as a National Guard or Reserve service member, this should give you an idea of what to expect.

 

RELATED:

 

 

Mississippi Veterans Benefits & Disabled Veterans Benefits

The following are the Mississippi veterans’ benefits programs for education, employment, housing and healthcare for 2018 and 2019.

Mississippi Veterans’ Benefits Programs

Education Benefits for Mississippi Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the states.

Mississippi Educational Assistance

Children of any member of the armed services whose official home of record and residence is within the State of Mississippi and who is officially reported as being either a prisoner of war or missing in action can receive an eight semester scholarship, without cost, exclusive of books, food, school supplies, materials and dues or fees for extracurricular activities at any state supported college or university within the State. Miss. Code Ann., §37-108-1.

The Adjutant General of Mississippi is authorized to pay the tuition for certain members of the active Mississippi National Guard who are enrolled within the State of Mississippi in an accredited institution of higher learning, vocational education school or junior college.

Mississippi State University and the Mississippi National Guard

Announced a new program that will ensure free tuition for Mississippi National Guard service members enrolled full-time at MSU. To be eligible for the Bulldog Free Tuition program, service members must be full-time undergraduate students, in good standing with their unit and cannot be within a year of their expiration of term of service.

Find colleges in Mississippi with our School Finder.  Use the filters to sort schools by state.

Housing Benefits for Mississippi Veterans

Mississippi Veterans Home Purchase Board

The Veterans Home Purchase Board provides low interest mortgage loans in amount up to $250,000. This is for eligible veterans and unmarried surviving spouses to purchase an existing single family home or to build a new home. To be eligible, the veteran must be a Mississippi resident before entering the military or be a resident for two consecutive years before they apply for the loan. They veteran must have a Certificate of Eligibility for Home Loan Guaranty form the Department of Veterans Affairs and be discharged under honorable conditions.

Property Tax

A disabled veteran may receive a full property tax exemption on his or her primary residence if the assessed value is $7,500 or less and the veteran is 100% disabled because of their service.

Health Care Benefits for Mississippi Veterans

Mississippi Veterans Nursing Homes

Mississippi has four State Veterans Nursing Homes with 150 beds per home located in Jackson, Oxford, Collins, and Kosciusko. Each place has skilled and dedicated professionals to provide care for eligible veterans and their spouses. In order to be eligible for a home, a service member will need to have been a Mississippi resident, have qualifying military service, and have been discharged under other than dishonorable conditions. They can also be the spouse of a veteran who resides in one of the State Veterans Nursing Homes. Those who are out of state may be admitted if there are no Mississippi residents waiting for a bed. Any out of state applicants must have a medical need for nursing home care and must be able to pay the applicable daily charge for care in the home.

Employment Benefits for Mississippi Veterans

Mississippi’s Pledge to Hire a Hero

The Mississippi Department of Employment Security partners with businesses through its network of WIN Job centers across the state. The center staff can help with free job postings and help businesses save time and money by providing requirement, screening, and referral of qualified candidates. Veterans can also find information on work opportunities, tax credits, and on-the-job training.

County Veterans Service Officer

County Veterans Service Officers Counties may employ a County Veterans Service Officer if they are an honorably discharged or honorably released veteran of any war or police action in which the US Armed Forces of the United States has been in, be the surviving spouse or child of any such deceased veteran, or any person employed as a County Veterans Service Officer in any county of the State of Mississippi on March 30th, 1990. They also must be certified by the Mississippi State Veterans Affairs Board which will require that they attend at least one of two annual training programs provided each year and successfully complete a written examination each year on the duties and responsibilities of and assistance available to such officers and veterans. They will not be entitled to any compensation for their service unless they are annually certified by the State Veterans Affairs Board.

Ad Valorem Tax Exemption

Any veteran that has a service-connected, total disability, and been honorably discharged from the military shall be exempt from all Ad Valorem taxes on the assessed value of their homestead property. This will also be extended to any unremarried surviving spouses of these veterans.

State Retirement

If a veteran is a member of the State Public Employees Retirement System and served in the Armed Forces of the United States or served in Maritime service during periods of hostility in WWII they shall be entitled to up to four years credit for active duty. They would have needed to have entered State Service after they were discharged from the Armed Forces or after they completed Maritime Service. Credit can be extended beyond four years if the veteran can prove that they were retained in the Armed Forces or Maritime Service during WWII by causes beyond their control and without opportunity for discharge.

Credit for Taxpayers That Employ Certain Veterans

If a taxpayer employs a new hire after January 1, 2015, they will then be allowed an annual credit against the taxes imposed as long as their new hire is an honorably discharged veteran who served on active duty in the Armed Forces on or after September 11, 2001, and who has been unemployed for six consecutive months immediately prior to being employed by them.

Employment Preference

The State Personnel Board designates veteran or disabled veterans status of applicants on the lists of eligible applicants for job vacancies within state service. The lists are sent to agencies that are seeking to fill vacancies. In state layoffs, veterans are granted preference and disabled veterans are granted additional preference.

Reemployment

If a member of any reserve component of the US Armed Forces leaves a position in order to perform duties or receive training, they shall be entitled to return to their position or a similar position with the same status, pay and seniority when the are done with their service. This does not apply if the service member had a temporary position. They will be considered absence with leave but may be without pay.

Professional License Reciprocity

Those in the military or military services who are moving or who have moved to Mississippi because of an active duty transfer may obtain licenses for many professions faster than usual. These licences include teaching, accounting, cosmetology, engineering, and real estate brokerage. Those who work as physicians, nurses, dentists, dieticians, and in other medical jobs can also qualify. Individuals with military training may count their experience toward requirements for various jobs licences, certifications, and registrations, subject to guidelines set by the licencing boards. State licensing boards can also grant either a permanent or temporary occupational licence. People who have temporary licences can start working while applying for permanent ones.

Military Retirement Pay

Retirement pay does not get taxed in the state of Mississippi.

For more information regarding Mississippi veterans’ benefits, please visit – Mississippi Veterans Affairs Board

 

Related state military and veteran information:

State Veterans’ Benefits – By State

Mississippi BAH Rates

Yellow Ribbon Schools

 

PAY AND BENEFITS UPDATES FOR 2019:

Military Benefits Updates for 2019

BAH Rates 2019

Military to Receive Pay Raise in 2019

Military Pay Dates 2019

USAA Pay Dates 2019

Navy Federal Pay Dates 2019

National Guard Pay and Reserve Pay

 

 

Minnesota Veterans Benefits & Disabled Veterans Benefits

The following are the Minnesota veterans’ benefits programs for education, employment, housing and healthcare.

Minnesota Veterans’ Benefits Programs

Education Benefits for Minnesota Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the states.

Minnesota GI Bill

The Minnesota GI Bill is available to

  • Minnesota veterans who served honorably in any branch of the armed forces at any time
  • non-veterans who served honorably for a cumulative total of five years or more as a member of the MN National Guard or any other active or reserve component and had active service after September 11, 2001
  • eligible spouses, surviving spouses, and children of permanently and totally disabled veterans who are eligible for the Federal GI Bill.

Full-time undergraduate or graduate students may be eligible to receive up to $1,000 per semester and part-time students can receive up to $500 per semester (up to $3,000 per academic year and $10,000 per lifetime).

OJT and Apprenticeship individuals are eligible for up to $2,000 per fiscal year for either program. Approved employers are eligible to receive $1,000 placement credit payable upon hiring a person under this program and another $1,000 after 12 consecutive months of employment. Recipients must be a Minnesota resident under the age of 62, and enrolled at a Minnesota institution.

Surviving Spouse & Dependent Education Benefit

The Surviving Spouse and Dependent Education benefit is for spouses and dependents, including adopted and step-children, whose veteran spouse and/or veteran parent died while on active duty, or as a result of a service-connected condition.

The veteran must have been a resident of Minnesota when they entered the military, or have been a resident of Minnesota for at least six months prior to passing away due to a service connected disability.

Applicants must be Minnesota residents and the spouse cannot be remarried.

There is no age limitation for eligible survivors. Surviving spouses and dependents can get a bachelor’s degree without paying tuition.

They also get $750 per year for fees, books and supplies, and/or room and board.

The benefit is available at MN state schools or private schools in the state.

> Find VA-approved colleges and universities in Minnesota with our School Finder.

Minnesota State Tuition Reimbursement (STR)

Eligibility:

  • You must be a member of the Minnesota National Guard.
  • You are eligible for STR for classes that you attend AT AN ACCREDITED COLLEGE after completion of basic training.
  • State policy requires Minnesota National Guard enlisted Soldiers to apply for Federal Tuition Assistance (FTA) in GoArmyEd.com BEFORE they are eligible to apply for State Tuition Reimbursement (STR). Officers are exempt due to the service obligation they incur with use of FTA.
  • You must remain in the Minnesota National Guard during the entire term of courses.
  • E1 to O5, including Warrant Officers are eligible for State Tuition Reimbursement. The lifetime maximum State Tuition Reimbursement benefit is 208 quarter or 144 Semester credits.
  • State Tuition Reimbursement has been extended to service members who have satisfactorily completed their service contract in the Minnesota National Guard who served honorably in federal active service or federally funded state active service since September 11, 2001.
    • Eligibility is extended for a period of two years, plus the amount of time equal to the duration of that person’s active service.
    • State Tuition Reimbursement has been extended to service members who have been separated or discharged from that organization due to a service-connected injury, disease, or disability.
    • Eligibility period is extended for eight years beyond the date of separation.

Rate:

The Undergraduate reimbursement rate is up to 100% of the undergraduate rate of the University of Minnesota — Twin Cities Campus with a maximum yearly benefit of $17,000 per fiscal year (01 JUL through 30 JUN).

The Graduate reimbursement rate is up to 100% of the graduate rate of the University of Minnesota — Twin Cities Campus with a maximum yearly benefit of $36,000 per fiscal year (01 JUL through 30 JUN).

Housing Benefits for Minnesota Veterans

Property Tax Exemption

Disabled veterans may receive a property tax exemption of up to $300,000 on his or her primary residence if that veteran is 100% disabled as a result of their service. Veterans who have a disability rating of 70% or more may receive an exemption of up to $150,000. Surviving spouses of military personnel are eligible to receive a $300,000 exclusion.

SOAR

SOAR stands for SSI/SSDI, Outreach, Access, and Recovery. The Minnesota Department of Veterans Affairs, the Minnesota Department of Human Services, and the United States Social Security Administration has partnered together to provide Minnesota’s homeless and at-risk veterans with expanded access to Social Security Income and Social Security Disability Insurance benefits.

Minnesota Homeless Veteran Registry

The MDVA has created the Minnesota Homeless Veteran Registry which connects veterans experiencing homelessness with housing and services in their community. It also helps programs serving veterans to coordinate their efforts. Anyone who has served in the US Armed Forces, Reserves, or National Guard can join the registry, regardless of the type of discharge they have. Veterans can join directly or people can be referred.

Health Care Benefits for Minnesota Veterans

Women Veterans Program

The mission of the Minnesota Women Veterans Program is to ensure that women veterans have equal access to all federal and state benefits and services that they are entitled to. They respond to gender specific needs of women veterans and help ensure that they are treated with dignity and respect. Their events are geared to improve the awareness of available benefits, services, and eligibility for women who have served in the US Armed Forces.

Veterans Homes

There are five Veterans Homes in Minnesota and you can find them located in Fergus Falls, Hastings, Luverne, Minneapolis, and Silver Bay. They strive to deliver a safe, dignified, and compassionate health care system as well as provide a nurturing and engaging home environment for Minnesota’s heroes. Each home provides person-centered care which is designed and delivered according to the individual needs of each resident. The facilities provide a combination of skilled nursing care, special care units for dementia and Alzheimer’s, domiciliary care, rehabilitation services, recreational therapy and work therapy programs.

In order to become a resident, one would need to be a honorably discharged veteran who entered service from Minnesota or who is a current resident of Minnesota, who has also served 181 consecutive days on active duty, unless they were discharged earlier because of disability incurred in the line of duty. The spouse of an eligible veteran who is at least 55 years of age and meets the residency requirements can also apply. Those who apply will need to be able to demonstrate a medical or clinical need for admission.

Employment Benefits for Minnesota Veterans

Veteran Status Verification Request for the Minnesota Small Business Procurement Program

The Minnesota Department of Administration operates a Targeted Group called the Economically Disadvantaged and Veteran Owned Small Business Procurement Program where Certified Veteran Owned Small Businesses may be eligible for a 6% preference in selling their products and services to the State. The principal place of business must be in Minnesota. To apply, a person must be a veteran, or a veteran with a service-connected disability as determined by the US Department of Veterans Affairs.

Minnesota Veterans Preference

The Minnesota Veterans Preference Act (VPA) gives veterans a limited preference over non-veterans in hiring and promotion for most Minnesota public employment positions. The preference might also apply to certain spouses of veterans. Veterans who apply for an open competitive position in a Minnesota county, city, school district or other political subdivision, who receive a passing rating, may choose to receive a credit of 10 extra points. Veterans who have a compensable service-connected disability, who receive a passing rating, may choose to receive a credit of 15 points. Spouses of deceased veterans or disabled veterans who can’t qualify because of their disability, may also choose to receive extra points. Service-connected disabled veterans with a 50% or greater rating may choose to receive a credit of five extra points.

When it comes to Minnesota State Agency positions, if minimum qualifications are met, disabled veterans will be ranked ahead of veterans, and veterans will be ranked ahead of non-veterans. Recently separated veterans who served on or after September 11, 2001, must be considered for the position and the top five recently separated veterans must be granted an interview.

MDVA Resources for Veterans Looking for Employment

The MDVA partners with DEED (Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development) to support veterans to find work in a new career. Veterans can visit their nearest Minnesota Workforce Center and contact a veteran employment representative, they can use the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities MyMilitary GPS Lifeplan to create a career goal, and post their resume on www.MinnesotaWorks.net.

Other Minnesota Veterans’ Benefits

Minnesota Commanders’ Task Force

The Minnesota Commanders’ Task Force is made up of non Congressionally Chartered Veterans Organizations to include the Disabled American Veterans, American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Military Order of the Purple Heart, Vietnam Veterans of America, Jewish War Veterans, Paralyzed Veterans of America, Marine Corps League and the American Veterans. The CTF meets regularly in order to discuss the many issues that are affecting Minnesota’s Veterans as well as their families.

Support Our Troops Licence Plates

The Minnesota Department of Veterans Affairs with the Minnesota Department of Military Affairs uses the annual minimum contribution of $30 from the Support Our Troops licence plate for cars and motorcycles. The money is for the betterment of military families, homeless, and underserved veterans in the state of Minnesota.

Minnesota Service Core

The Minnesota Service Core brings essential, community-based services directly to veterans and their families across Minnesota to no cost to them. They have partnered with Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota to provide comprehensive assistance through an existing network of resources. Their services include individual and family counseling, financial counseling, debt management, addiction counseling, disability services, and in-home counseling. The LSS case workers are in field offices in the Twin Cities metro area, Alexandria, Bemidji, Brainerd, Detroit Lakes, Duluth, Fergus Falls, Mankato, Moorhead, St. Cloud and Willmar.

Military Retirement Pay

Minnesota does not tax retirement pay.

For more information regarding Minnesota veterans’ benefits, please visit – Minnesota Department of Veterans Services

 

RELATED:

PAY AND BENEFITS INFO:

 

 

Michigan Veterans Benefits

Michigan Veterans Benefits Programs

The following are the Michigan veterans’ benefits programs for education, employment, housing and healthcare.

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Education Benefits for Michigan Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the states.

Michigan Children of Veteran Tuition Grant

The grant provides undergraduate tuition assistance for natural or adopted children of veterans who are permanently and totally disabled or died as a result of military service. Children must be between 16 and 26.

$600 Buy-up Program

Some reservists may contribute up to an additional $600 to the Montgomery GI Bill® to receive increased monthly benefits. For an additional $600 contribution, you may receive up to $5,400 in additional GI Bill benefits. You must be a member of a Ready Reserve component (Selected Reserve, Individual Ready Reserve or Inactive National Guard) to pay into the buy-up program.

Note: Break (or interval pay) is no longer payable under REAP except during periods your school is closed as a result of an Executive Order of the President or an emergency (such as a natural disaster or strike).

For example, if your Fall term ends on December 15 and your Spring term begins January 10, your January housing allowance will cover 15 days in December and your February housing allowance will cover 21 days in January.

Michigan National Guard State Tuition Assistance Program

Public Act 259 of 2014 established STAP to provide tuition assistance of up to $6,000 (tuition and fees combined) per academic year to members of the Michigan National Guard attending any public or private college, university, vocational school, technical school or trade school located in Michigan.

RELATED: Tuition Assistance Overview, National Guard Tuition Assistance

STAP provides assistance to students in any course of study that is intended to culminate in vocational or technical training, a certificate or the student’s first associate’s, bachelor’s or master’s degree.

 

Find VA-Approved Schools in Michigan

 

Housing Benefits for Michigan Veterans

Property Tax Waiver

Those who are 100% permanently and totally disabled veterans and veterans who are entitled to veteran benefits at the 100% rate as well as unmarried surviving spouses (if the veteran passed away before benefit could be granted) may request a property tax waiver.

In order to be eligible, the veteran must have been honorably discharged from the US Armed Forces and must be a Michigan resident. They also need to either have a certificate from the VA that they have received or will be receiving pecuniary assistance due to a disability for specially adapted housing or have been rated by the VA as individually unemployable.

An unmarried surviving spouse is eligible based on the eligibility of their spouse but they also must be a Michigan resident. They can continue to get the exemption until they remarry. When possible, the submission should be made within the first two months of the assessment year.

Income Tax Credit for Property Tax Paid

The state will provide a tax credit for property tax paid by a disabled veteran or surviving spouse. The benefit varies based on the veteran’s disability rating and family income. Even if no income tax is due, the veteran can still submit a MI-1040CR-2 to receive the income tax as a tax refund.

Health Care Benefits for Michigan Veterans

Veterans’ Homes

Michigan has two Veterans’ Homes, the Grand Rapids Home for Veterans and the D.J. Jacobetti Home for Veterans. They are both operated by the MVAA.

In order to be able to go to the homes, the veteran must be eligible for VA health care or financial assistance for long-term care. They also must have served 90 days of active duty and been honorably discharged.

If the veteran enlisted after September 7, 1980 or entered active duty after October 16th, 1981, they must have served 24 continuous months or the full period for which they were called to active duty.

Entry is subject to space and certain other requirements. Spouses, surviving spouses, or parents of an eligible veteran may also be eligible for admission.

Employment Benefits for Michigan Veterans

Pure Michigan Talent Connect

This program brings job seekers and potential employers together from across Michigan all in one spot. Users will be able to post their resume, access job postings, and learning about upcoming hiring events.

Veterans will receive “veteran preference” on the website which will include 24-hour advance notice of job postings before the general public.

Wounded Veteran Internship Program

This program is run by the Michigan Department of Transportation. They offer opportunities to veterans who can’t return to their previous civilian job after serving in combat. Placements will depend on the veteran’s knowledge, skills, and abilities.

Veteran Employment Opportunities

This program is intended to meet the employment needs of honorably discharged veterans of the US Armed Forces as they transition into the civilian workforce. Run by, MDOT (Michigan Department of Transportation,) they are partnering with nationwide service-related organizations to fill needed positions for veterans.

MDOT has possible opportunities in areas such as:

    • Aeronautics
    • Engineering
    • Finance
    • Maintenance
    • Planning
    • Project management
    • Administrative

Licensing Fees

The State of Michigan helps veterans get established in various professions by waiving licensing fees for certain occupations and certain levels of experience.

They are working on policies in health care, engineering, and for jobs such as being a carpenter, a plumber, a truck driver, a dental assistant, an EMT, and a mechanic.

Michigan is also working on identifying professions such as dental hygienists, where additional certifications might be needed as well as helping those who work in the nursing or medicine fields to quickly become licenced in the state of Michigan.

RELATED: Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) for Military Spouses

Veterans’ Preference

There is Veterans’ Preference for veterans who are qualified for a job in classified service. They will need to be a veteran that:

    • Has served 90 or more calendar days of active duty service in the US Armed Forces
    • Was honorably discharged from active duty
    • Has not retired from any uniformed service.

For a disabled veteran, they will need to have been determined to be eligible for disability compensation by the US Department of Veterans Affairs or a branch of the US Armed Forces as a result of a service-connected disability. A spouse, or a surviving spouse can also use this preference.

RELATED: Guide to Veterans’ Preference Points

For civil service preference points, 5 points will be added to the final passing score of a veteran or surviving spouse, 10 points will be added for a disabled veteran, a spouse of a disabled veteran with greater than 50% service-connected disability, a surviving spouse who has a child under 18 years of age, or a surviving spouse with continuing parental care of a disabled child.

For agency preference points, preference points equal to 5% of the highest attained screening score will be added to the screening score of a veteran or a surviving spouse, 10% will be added to the score of a disabled veteran, a spouse of a disabled veteran with greater than 50% service-connected disability, a surviving spouse who has a child under 18 years of age, or a surviving spouse with continuing parental care of a disabled child.

If a qualified eligible applicant is not given preference points under the previous two methods, the appointing authority shall give preferential consideration if they use a mechanical or random screening process to reduce the number of applicants placed in the candidate pool. They will make sure that the applicant is retained and placed in the candidate pool. If a qualified and eligible candidate is retained in the candidate pool they must be evaluated by the appointing authority using the same merit appraisal methods used for other candidates.

Other Michigan Veterans’ Benefits

Retirement Pay

The State of Michigan does not tax military retirement pay.

The Michigan Veterans Trust Fund

The MVTF provides emergency grants to Michigan veterans and dependent family members to help them through a short-term financial crisis. They can be applied for through the MVTF county committee serving the veterans county of residence.

To be eligible, the veteran will need to be a Michigan resident, honorably discharged with 180 days of service during a period of war, with 90 days for World War I  veterans, 180 days of active duty with award of Armed Forces or the Navy/Marine Corps Expeditionary Medal, or less than 180 days of wartime service due to service-incurred disability.

Dependents can apply if veteran is eligible under certain circumstances.

For more information regarding Michigan veterans’ benefits, please visit – Michigan Veterans Affairs Agency

 

RELATED:

 

PAY AND BENEFITS INFO:

 

 

Massachusetts Veterans & Disabled Veterans Benefits

The following are the Massachusetts veterans’ benefits programs for education, employment, housing and healthcare.

Massachusetts Veterans’ Benefits Programs

Education Benefits for Massachusetts’ Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the states.

Massachusetts Tuition Waivers

A tuition waiver is available for all Massachusetts veterans to all state colleges and universities.

Veterans of Massachusetts can be eligible for a tuition waiver at any state-supported course in an undergraduate degree program offered by a public college or university. Veterans will be eligible on a space-available basis for a waiver of full or partial tuition.

> Find colleges and universities in Massachusetts with our School Finder.

Massachusetts Tuition and Fee Waivers for Guard Members

The Massachusetts National Guard Education Assistance Program provides a 100% tuition and fee waiver for Massachusetts National Guard soldiers attending a state college, university, or community college program.

Generally, these state-supported programs are offered during the day as part of a degree program.

Your assistance can continue as long as you are in good standing academically and until you have reached 130 semester hours.

Massachusetts Soldiers Legacy Fund

The Massachusetts Soldiers Legacy Fund (MSLF) has been established to specifically help the children of Massachusetts servicemen and women who have died while deployed on Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom.

The MSLF is specifically designed to grant funds for current and future college/university students whose parents “home of record” at the Department of Defense was Massachusetts and were killed on deployment during Operations Enduring or Iraqi Freedom.

There is no selection process. If the student is a child of a serviceman or woman whose service is credited to Massachusetts and gave his/her life in Operation Enduring or Iraqi Freedom, that student qualifies for funds.

Prior to each school year, the trustees will distribute equal grant shares to those students who qualify.

The only requirement for recipients will be that they have filed applications establishing that they are qualified, and that they remain enrolled in the undergraduate or postgraduate program at the college or university.

> Find colleges and universities in Massachusetts with our School Finder.

Housing Benefits for Massachusetts’ Veterans

Property Tax Exemption

Disabled veterans in Massachusetts may receive a property tax exemption on his or her residence. To qualify, veterans must be at least 10 % disabled, must have lived in Massachusetts for six months prior to enlisting, and have lived in the state for five consecutive years. An exemption of $400 may be received if the veteran is 10% or more disabled, a Purple Heart Recipient, or a Gold Star Parent. They can receive a $750 exemption if they lost the use of one hand, one foot or one eye. They can receive a $1,250 exemption if they lost use of both of their hands, both feet or a combination of the two or if the veteran is blind in both eyes as a result of service. They can receive a $1,500 exemption if 100% disabled as a result of service.

Health Care Benefits for Massachusetts’ Veterans

Soldiers’ Homes

Massachusetts has two Soldiers’ Homes, one in Holyoke and one in Chelsea. To qualify, a veteran will need to have served in the armed forces for 90 consecutive days, one of which was during a time of war, and received an honorable military discharge. In certain circumstances, they may have served 180 days of regular active service and will then be able to qualify for services from the home in Holyoke.

Employment Benefits for Massachusetts’ Veterans

Veterans’ Employment Representatives

Veterans’ Employment Representatives will be able to help veterans organize their job search, work to help design a personal employment plan, assist with writing a resume, and help them develop job leads. VERs are state employees that are located in the state’s One-Stop Career Centers.

Civil Service for Veterans

Veterans are given preference on eligibility lists of civil service positions in the following order: disabled veterans, veterans, and spouses or single parents of veterans who were killed in action or who have died from a service-connected disability incurred during wartime services, as long as the spouse or parent has not remarried.

All veterans will have two points added to their overall score and are not placed at the top of the list. Civil service uses a system of absolute veteran’s preference in which someone qualifying as a veteran who passes the open competitive exam is placed higher on the resulting eligible list except in respect to residency preference on Firefighter and police officer lists.

For labor service, there is no exam required but the veteran must submit an application and required documentation that they are a veteran. All veterans, disabled or non disabled are placed at the top of the specific labor service eligibility list for state agencies and the city of Boston. Spouses and single parents of veterans are placed below veterans but above other applicants.

Retirement Pay

Massachusetts does not tax military retirement pay.

Other Veterans’ Benefits Programs for Massachusetts’ Veterans

Statewide Advocacy for Veterans’ Empowerment (SAVE)

The SAVE program is there to help advocate for veterans who are not able to obtain the benefits they have earned because of institutional or personal barriers. They want to prevent suicide and mental health distress through the identification of issues facing veterans when they return from service and transition back to civilian life. SAVE will act as a liaison between veterans and their families and the various agencies within the federal and state government. They also work closely with the Massachusetts National Guard. The resources offered by them, including their Family Readiness Program are available to all service members and their families, regardless of the branch that they serve.

Disabled Veteran Fee and Tax Exemptions

Registration Fee-Disabled veterans do not need to pay a registration fee for one passenger vehicle or a pick-up truck. The vehicle must be owned by the veteran and used for a non-commercial purposes. Registration fees will need to be paid for additional vehicles. The veteran can choose one set of DV plates or one set of passenger plates.

Driver’s Licence Fee– Disabled veterans do not need to pay fees for driver’s licence transactions as long as they have been approved for DV plates, regardless of if they use them or not.

Excise Tax– Disabled veterans do not need to pay excise tax for one passenger vehicle or a pick-up truck. It will need to be owned by the veteran and used for non-commercial purposes. The veteran will need to have been approved for DV plates, regardless of it they use them or not. Excise tax must be paid on additional vehicles and the veteran must apply and be approved for this.

Sales Tax– Disabled veterans do not need to pay sales tax for one passenger vehicle or pick-up truck. It must be owned by the veteran and used for non-commercial purposes. The veteran will need to obtain DV plates for the vehicle. Sales tax will need to be paid on additional vehicles.

Annuity

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts and its Department of Veterans’ Services provide an annuity of $2,000, to be paid biannually on August 1st and February 1st of $1,000 each. This annuity is given in recognition of 100% service-connected disabled veterans and to the parents and unmarried spouses of those veterans who gave their lives in the service of their country during wartime. Veterans must have an honorable discharge, meet one of the service time requirements, be a resident of Massachusetts at the time of applying for the annuity and continue to be a resident, and meet the requirements for blindness, paraplegia, double amputation or other disability that qualifies and is certified by the Department of Veterans Affairs. For a parent or spouse, the death of the veteran must be service-connected, they must reside in Massachusetts, and continue to reside there, and the spouse must not be remarried.

Bonuses

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts will provide a bonus to veterans who were domiciled in Massachusetts immediately prior to entry in the Armed Forces. If the veteran has died, the spouse and children, mother or father, brother or sister, or other dependents of the veteran are eligible for a bonus, in that order. There are bonuses for World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Persian Gulf War, and the Welcome Home Bonus.

World War II: Veterans can receive $100 if they served in active duty from one day to six months, $200 for veterans who performed stateside for six or more months, and $300 for those who performed foreign service.

Korean War: Veterans can receive $100 for serving 90 days stateside, $200 for veterans who performed six months or more and $300 for any service member serving one or more days outside of the continental US.

Vietnam War: Veterans can receive $200 if they have performed active duty between July 1st, 1958 and May 16th, 1975, and served at least six months or more. Those who served on duty in Vietnam will receive $300.

Persian Gulf War: Service members that served between August 2nd, 1990 and April 10th, 1991 for 30 days or more are able to receive the bonus. Those who were called to duty in areas other than the Persian Gulf will receive $300, and those called to duty and served in the Persian Gulf who have received the Southwest Asia Service Medal will receive $500.

Welcome Home Bonus: This bonus is for veterans who have resided in Massachusetts for at least six months prior to joining the Armed Forces beginning on September 11, 2001. Those who have served in Iraq or Afghanistan will receive $1,000. Those who have served stateside or outside the continental limits of the US for six months or more of active duty will receive $500.

Applications for the bonus are available online through the Treasurer’s website.

For more information regarding Massachusetts veterans’ benefits, please go here.

RELATED:

PAY AND BENEFITS INFO:

 

Maryland Veteran Benefits & Disabled Veteran Benefits

The following are the Maryland veterans’ benefits programs for education, employment, healthcare and housing for 2018 and 2019.

Education Benefits for Maryland Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ education benefits programs provided by the state of Maryland.

Veterans of the Afghanistan and Iraq Conflicts (VAIC) Scholarship Program

This Scholarship Program is designed to provide financial assistance to the United States Armed Forces Personnel who served in the Afghanistan or Iraq Conflicts, and their sons, daughters, or spouses who are current high school seniors, and full time or part time, degree seeking undergraduate students enrolled in an eligible Maryland post-secondary institution.

Edward T. and Mary A. Conroy Memorial Scholarship Program

This scholarship program is designed to provide financial assistance to sons and daughters of members of the U.S. Armed Forces who

  • died as a result of military service
  • has a service connected 100% permanent disability as a result of military service
  • has a service connected disability of 25% or greater as a result of military service and has exhausted or is no longer eligible for federal veterans education benefits.
  • are POW/MIA’s of the Vietnam Conflict and their sons and daughters
  • are sons, daughters or surviving spouses (who have not remarried) of victims of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks who died as a result of the attacks
  • are sons, daughters or surviving spouses (who have not remarried) of State of local public safety employees or volunteers who died in the line of duty or who sustained an injury in the line of duty that rendered the public safety employee or volunteer 100% disabled
  •  State or local public safety employees or volunteers who became 100% disabled in the line of duty.

Current high school seniors, full time and part time, degree seeking undergraduate and graduate students may apply.

Maryland State National Guard Education Benefits

Up to 50% of Tuition and Fees for waiver and up to $750 or 50% of remaining balance after applying all other applicable benefits.

For Reimbursement: Must attain a C or better and is limited to E4 and below pursuing first degree.

Find colleges in Maryland with our School Finder.  Use the filters to sort schools by state.

Housing Benefits for Maryland Veterans

Property Tax Exemption

Veterans with a permanent and total service connected disability rated 100% by the Veterans Administration may receive a complete exemption from real property taxes on their dwelling house and their yard. Certain unmarried surviving spouses may also be eligible as well as surviving spouses of military personnel that were killed in the line of duty.

Health Care Benefits for Maryland Veterans

Charlotte Hall Veterans’ Home

Maryland has one veterans’ home, Charlotte Hall. Charlotte Hall Veterans’ Home has been open since 1985 and is situated on 126 acres in St. Mary’s County. It offers an assisted living program as well as a skilled nursing program. There is memory care in secure units as well. The home is also certified for Medicare and Medicaid and their vision is to continually develop and deliver a safe, dignified and compassionate health care system as well as providing a nurturing and engaging home environment for Maryland’s veterans.

In order to apply the veteran will need to have served on full time active duty in the US Armed Forces, other than active duty for training, and discharged or released under honorable conditions. Certain members of the reserves who meet the legal residence requirement as well as non-veteran spouses of eligible veterans can also be admitted to the Veterans Home. The veterans will also need to be a Maryland resident and at least 62 years of age or deemed disabled by the Social Security Administration or the US Department of Veterans Affairs. If the Charlotte Hall Veterans’ Home feels that the veteran would not be a good choice due to health, safety, or welfare reasons, they can decline to accept them.

Employment Benefits for Maryland Veterans

Maryland State Careers for Veterans

A veteran may receive 10 points of credit on any selection test is they are an eligible veteran, the spouse of one who has a service connected disability, or the surviving spouse of a deceased eligible veteran. A former prisoner or war will receive a credit of an additional two points.

If a manager elects to hire from a certified list of disabled veterans, who have served in any branch of the US Armed Forces, candidates may be selected without a competitive selection process. To qualify for this, candidates must be minimally qualified for the position, be able to perform the duties of the job with or without a reasonable accommodation, and present documentation certifying that they are on the permanent disability list with a rating of at least 30%. They are not qualified if they hold a permanent appointment or have mandatory reinstatement rights to a permanent appointment.

CDL Skills Test Waiver

The Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration (MVA) will have the ability to waive the driver skills test required to obtain a Class A or B Commercial Driver’s Licence (CDL) for recently discharged service members. They will need to have two years of experience driving vehicles as part of their job function immediately preceding their discharge from the military, have a good driving record, their commanding officer will need to certify the service member’s years of operating the vehicle as well as the type of vehicle operated to determine appropriate licence classification, and the applicant must pass the CDL knowledge test.

The Military Personnel and Veteran-Owned Small Business No-Interest Loan Program

This program serves a small business owned by a military reservist, or a national guard member that has been called to active duty, a small business that employs a military reservist or national guard member called to active duty, a veteran small business owner or a veteran seeking to start a small business, or a small business that employs a service disabled veteran. The purpose of the program is to provide financial assistance to small businesses. The no-interest loans range from $1,000 to $50,000, loan maturity will be from one to eight years and the loan repayment period usually will not exceed the useful life expectancy of the equipment purchased.

Occupational and Professional Licensing

The Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing and Commissioner of Financial Regulation are dedicated to assisting recently discharged veterans and spouses of currently serving members of the US Armed Forces, to include active duty reservists and members of the National Guard to obtain an occupational and professional license in Maryland.

Some occupational and professional licences can be expedited for recently discharged veterans and spouses of currently serving members of the US Armed Forces, to include active duty reservists and members of the national guard.

The Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) credentials educators who are required to hold a certificate to teach in certain Maryland Public Schools, non-public special education schools and other state agencies. They will expedite credentialing for US Armed Forces service members and their spouses seeking employment as educators in these entities.

Other Maryland Veterans’ Benefits

Maryland’s Commitment to Veterans

Maryland’s Commitment to Veterans is a program with the Maryland Department of Health that is devoted to total wellness for veterans and their families. Regional resource coordinators will provide assistance to them to help support a healthy transition to civilian life. They will provide a solid connection to wellness services with an emphasis on mental health and substance use disorder services. They also offer information and referrals to community resources and assists a veteran while they navigate the various resource options available to them within the local community.

Military Retirement Pay

Military retirement income can be subtracted, up to $10,000, with an increase to the first $15,000 if the veteran or spouse is at least 55 years old, from their federal adjusted gross income before deducting Maryland taxes. The retirement income must have been received during induction into the US Armed Forces for training and service under the Selective Training and Service Act of 1940 or a subsequent act of similar nature, a membership in a reserve component, a membership in an active component, or a membership in the Maryland National Guard. This benefit will also apply to those who were separated from active duty employment with the commissioned corps of the Public Health Service, the National Oceanic and Atmpperic Administration or the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

For more information regarding Maryland veterans’ benefits, please visit – Maryland Department of Veterans Affairs

 

Related state military and veteran information:

State Veterans’ Benefits – By State

Maryland BAH Rates

Yellow Ribbon Schools

 

PAY AND BENEFITS UPDATES FOR 2019:

Military Benefits Updates for 2019

BAH Rates 2019

Military to Receive Pay Raise in 2019

Military Pay Dates 2019

USAA Pay Dates 2019

Navy Federal Pay Dates 2019

National Guard Pay and Reserve Pay

 

 

US Marine Corps Tuition Assistance: What You Need to Know

While serving in the Marine Corps, you might find yourself wanting to go to school. With the USMC Tuition Assistance program, you can receive money for some or all of your classes depending on the degree you want to get.

USMC Tuition Assistance

Each branch offers Tuition Assistance (TA), with their own service-specific criteria. Here is what you need to know about Tuition Assistance in the Marine Corps.

RELATED: Marine Corps Education Programs

Who can use Tuition Assistance in the Marine Corps?

  • Marine Corps Tuition Assistance is available for all active duty and active reserve marines.
  • Officers, both active duty, and reserve must have two years of service obligation remaining to apply for Tuition Assistance.
  • Reservists on a set of active duty orders must finish their class before their orders end.
  • First-time active duty applicants need to have 24 months of service before they can receive TA. However, O-5 level commanders can reduce the minimum in-service time to 18 months if they believe that you have demonstrated significant extraordinary effort beyond what has been required.

What can you use Tuition Assistance for?

  • You can use Tuition Assistance for educational programs through master’s degrees.
  • You can use TA for career and technical education certificates if the programs are accredited by an accrediting body recognized by the Department of Education and be approved by the Department of Veterans Affairs as well as having a signed DOD memorandum of understanding.
  • TA is for tuition only, and not for fees or costs such as room and board, books, or transportation. You also can not use TA for the cost of exams.
  • There is a limit for TA of two classes at a time. First-time TA users need to start with just one class unless there is documentation that you have had at least an associate’s degree or at least 60 academic credits and a minimum grade point average GPA of 2.0.
  • No courses can overlap.
  • You can not use Tuition Assistance for duplicate degrees or double majors.

How does one request Tuition Assistance?

  • Your first step would be to contact your Marine Corps Voluntary Education Center to receive educational counseling in person or by phone and to help determine the courses that you need to take.
  • You will then need to fill out an application in WebTA.
  • You should start your application at least 60 days in advance of the course or courses you want to take.

How much does USMC Tuition Assistance cover?

The Marine Corps will pay for 100% of your tuition, up to $250 per semester hour, $166 per quarter hour, and $16.67 per clock hour. There is also a cap of $4,500 per fiscal year.

What do I need to know about Tuition Assistance eligibility in the Marine Corps?

  • Your application must be command approved before it can be forwarded to the Voluntary Education Center for final approval.
  • The command approval is not automatic and will be based on the command’s anticipated mission requirements.
  • Your USMC Tuition Assistance application will need to be authorized before the start of the term.
  • You will need to print your voucher out and turn that into your school accounting office to process payment.
  • You will also need to make sure that you have completed the College 101 Brief, which is a 10-15 minute online Powerpoint presentation. First time TA users will also need to complete the Marine Corps Institute Personal Financial Management Course.

If you are serving in the US Marine Corps and would like to use Tuition Assistance for your education, make sure you qualify and make plans to sign up to receive these USMC educational benefits.

You can look up over 2,100 schools that accept Tuition Assistance in the CollegeRecon School Search tool.  Under the tab labeled “Vet/Military Service”, please check the filter “Approved for TA Funding.”

RELATED:

 

TUITION ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS:

 

 

 

 

 

Maine Veterans Benefits & Disabled Veterans Benefits

The following are the Maine veterans’ benefits programs for 2018 and 2019 in the areas of education, employment, healthcare and housing.

Maine Veterans Benefits

Education Benefits for Maine Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the state of Maine.

Maine Dependents Education Benefits Program

Maine provides a 100% waiver of tuition and all related fees for spouses and dependents of veterans as defined in Title 37B, Chapter 7, Section 505(2).  Specifically, veterans must meet the following criteria:

  • Has a 100% total permanent disability rating resulting from service-connected disability. Or who
  • Was killed in action;
  • Died from a service-connected disability as a result of service;
  • At the time of death was totally and permanently disabled due to a service-connected disability, but whose death was not related to the service-connected disability; or
  • Is a member of the Armed Forces on active duty listed for more than 90 days as missing in action, captured or forcibly detained or interned in the line of duty by a foreign government or power.

*”Veteran” means any person who served in the military or naval forces of the United States and entered the service from this State or has been a resident of this State for 5 years immediately preceding application for aid and, if living, continues to reside in this State throughout the duration of benefits administered under the educational benefits program.

Schools covered under this program include the University of Maine System, Maine Community Colleges, and Maine Maritime Academy.

State of Maine Guard Tuition Assistance

100% tuition waiver for Maine’s National Guard members to attend all of the schools in the University of Maine and Maine Community College Systems, as well as Maine Maritime Academy.

Find colleges in Maine with our School Finder.  Use the filters to sort schools by state.

Housing Benefits for Maine Veterans

Property Taxes

Veterans with or without service-connected disabilities and their surviving spouses may receive a property tax exemption of up to $6,000 on their primary residence, if the veteran is 62 years old or older or if they are 100% disabled.

For paraplegic veterans, if they have received a federal grant for a specially adapted housing unit, they may receive a $50,000 tax exemption.

Salute ME

MaineHousing offers qualified active duty, veterans, and retired military personnel a .25% discount to their First Home Loan 30-year fixed interest rate which is called Salute ME. They are also waiving the first-time homebuyer requirement for veterans who have previously owned a home, which is called the Salute Home Again program. Salute ME or Salute Home Again mortgages cannot be used to refinance a home people already own.

Salute ME can be combined with all MaineHousing insurers, while Salute Home Again can be combined with all insurers except for United Guaranty Pilot. In order to be eligible you must remain on active duty or have been honorably discharged from military service or served on active duty for 180 days or within a war zone, to include National Guard members.

Health Care Benefits for Maine Veterans

Maine Veterans’ Homes

There are six Maine Veterans’ Homes located in Augusta, Bangor, Caribou, Machias, Scarborough, and South Paris.

They have modern facilities with an array of services that include rehabilitation and therapy services, as well as long-term, short-term and skilled nursing care.

In order to apply, veterans must be honorably discharged from the military, must have been a resident of Maine at the time of their entry into the US Armed Forces, or be residents of Maine at the time of their application to MVH.

They also provide a place for spouses, widows or widowers, and gold star parents of eligible veterans.

All eligible veterans will need to have served one or more days on active duty, but they do not need to have served in combat or have a service-connected disability.

Veteran Employment Benefits in Maine

Maine Hire-A-Vet-Campaign

The Maine Hire-A-Vet-Campaign is run by the Maine Career Center. Each year the state sponsors a Hire-A-Vet Campaign that lasts for 100 days. It provides support for employers to expand the hiring of veterans and military family members. In 2017, there were 154 participating employers and 296 total hires, 275 veterans, and 21 family members. They also had a “Military Culture 202” training and employer panel to learn the best practices on recruiting, onboarding, and retaining veterans in the workplace.

Maine CareerCenter

Veterans, family members, and civilians seeing assistance with their job search and training can connect to their closest Maine CareerCenter. Veteran representatives and career counselors are available at each location.

Maine’s Occupational Licensing Initiative

Maine’s Department of Professional and Financial Regulation (DPFR) has led an initiative to accelerate the licencing process for veterans in the state. This program will allow for quicker, easier licencing for veterans who have demonstrable military experience in the areas of boiler, electrical, fuel, and plumbing. This allows DPFR greater flexibility in evaluating and crediting military experience towards licence and continuing education requirements. This eliminates the need for veterans to undergo duplicative and expensive training. DPFR will also be planning a series of licensing workshops that will allow qualified veterans to receive on the spot licensing and endorsements. DPFR also waves examination and licence fees for military veterans and their spouses

Military Pensions

Pensions and Taxations Maine Law prohibits taxing military pensions.

Veterans’ Preference

With Veterans’ Preference, for any position in the classified service, the employing agency shall offer an interview to any veteran or gold star spouse who meets the minimum qualifications that are established for the position.

An eligible veteran would be anyone who has served on active duty in the US Armed Forces to include the reserves and the national guard and received a discharge other than dishonorable.

A gold star spouse is defined as a widow or a widower of a veteran who is eligible to receive a gold star lapel pin under 10 United States Code, Section 1126 (2010.)

If a veteran applies for a state job and is not hired for that job, it is the policy of the Bureau of Human Resources to provide guidance to that veteran on other State of Maine openings which they may be qualified to apply.

Preference points will be added to the earned qualifying rating in examinations as long as a passing grade was received.

A veteran who served on active duty for at least 90 days consecutively and honorably separated, and a widow or widower of a veteran, who has never been remarried, will be granted a 5-point preference.

Veterans who have a service-connected disability of 10% or more and who receive compensation, a pension or disability retirement, are a spouse of a disabled veteran whose service-connected disability disqualifies him or her for appointment in the classified service in their usual occupation, or the widow or widower who has never remarried of a veteran who lost their life under honorable conditions while serving on active duty or who died as a result of a service-connected disability will receive a 10 point preference.

There is also a 10 point preference given to parents of those who have been killed during military service.

For more information regarding Maine veterans benefits, please visit – Maine Bureau of Veterans’ Services

 

Related state military and veteran information:

State Veterans’ Benefits – By State

Maine BAH Rates

Yellow Ribbon Schools

 

PAY AND BENEFITS UPDATES FOR 2019:

Military Benefits Updates for 2019

BAH Rates 2019

Military to Receive Pay Raise in 2019

Military Pay Dates 2019

USAA Pay Dates 2019

Navy Federal Pay Dates 2019

National Guard Pay and Reserve Pay

 

 

Louisiana Veterans Benefits & Disabled Veterans Benefits

The following are the Louisiana veterans’ benefits programs for 2018 and 2019.

Veteran Education Benefits in Louisiana

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans benefits programs provided by the state of Louisiana.

Louisiana Title 29 Dependents Educational Assistance

Louisiana offers education assistance to surviving spouses of deceased veterans as well as children of 90 percent or greater disabled veterans  and children of 100 percent disabled and unemployable veterans.

Related: Scholarships for Gold Star Families

Related: Scholarships for Military Spouses

The deceased veteran must have been a resident of the State of Louisiana for at least 12 months immediately preceding entry into service.

The living veteran must have lived in the state for at least 24 months prior to the child being admitted into the program.

The surviving spouse has 10 years to use the benefit; the child must be between the ages of sixteen and twenty-five to be eligible.

Louisiana National Guard Tuition

Members are exempt from tuition at any state-funded college, university, or vocational/technical school for five years or a bachelor’s degree, whichever comes first.

Find colleges in Louisiana with our School Finder.  Use the filters to sort schools by state.

Housing Benefits for Veterans in Louisiana

Property Tax

Disabled veterans may receive a property tax exemption of up to the first $150,000 of the assessed value of his or her primary residence. The veteran will need to be 100% disabled as a result of service.

Health Care Benefits for Louisiana Veterans

Louisiana Veterans Homes

LDVA operate five, state-of-the-art Veterans Homes across the state. Each of the facilities offer:

  • long-and short-term care
  • rehabilitative therapies
  • Alzheimer’s and intermediate care
  • skilled nursing
  • mental health services
  • centralized pharmacy services and more

In order to apply, veterans must be a resident of Louisiana unless:

  • referred from an in-state US Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center or
  • by a Louisiana Department of Veterans Affairs Veterans Assistance Counselor.

They must also have served on active duty 90 days or more.  If they have less than 90 days, they must have been discharged as a result of a disability incurred in the line of duty with an honorable discharge.

The veteran will have to go through a medical examination to confirm they:

  • do not have a communicable disease
  • do not require medical care that the facility can’t provide
  • do not exhibit violent traits which could be dangerous to the well-being of others.

The Veterans Homes are located in Jackson, Bossier City, Monroe, Reserve, and Jennings.

LA National Guard Death and Disability Benefit

For Louisiana National guardsmen who are suffering a permanent or total disability while on federal or state active duty on or after September 11, 2001 as well as those who are the beneficiary of record of those who have been killed in action, may qualify for a $250,000 death or a $100,000 disability benefit from the State of Louisiana.

Veteran Employment and Veteran Business Benefits in Louisiana

Veterans Corner

This is a program that is designed to assist veterans with finding employment by bringing employers and veterans together in the Lafayette/Acadiana area. This program is there to help veterans find employment by contacting employers and assisting the employers in finding the right candidate for the position. Veterans can view open positions on the Veterans Corner website.

LAVETBIZ

LAVETBIZ is a business initiative that helps provide additional opportunities for Louisiana based veteran and service-connected disabled veteran-owned small business owners when they need to find work with the State of Louisiana.

Louisiana State and Federal Civil Service

The Louisiana state and city civil service departments award either five or ten points to veterans who have served honorably in the US Armed Forces under certain circumstances. Those who served in combat, in any campaign for which a campaign medal was awarded, or at least 90 days of active service for purposes other than training after September 11, 2001 will receive five points. Those veterans who served in either peace or war time and who have one or more service-connected disabilities, are a spouse of a veteran whose physical condition precludes his or her appointment to a civil service job in his or her usual line of work, or unremarried widows and parents of a deceased veteran in certain circumstances will receive ten points.

Louisiana Business and Career Solution Centers

The Louisiana Workforce Commission operates local centers across the state to assist veterans in finding employment as well as making career choices and help with apprenticeship programs.

Retirement Income

Military retirement pay is exempt from Louisiana state taxation.

Other Louisiana State Veterans’ Benefits

Military Family Assistance (MFA) Fund

The Military Family Assistance Fund (MFA) can provide financial support to Louisiana Veterans and their families when they experience financial hardships. There is certain criteria that must be met and a completed application must be submitted to the LDVA including all of the supporting documentation. They will pay up to $10,000 for one claim per active-duty order in a 12 month period. The MFA is funded by private donations from individuals and corporations.

For more information regarding Louisiana veterans’ benefits, please visit – Louisiana Department of Veterans Affairs

Related state military and veteran information:

State Veterans’ Benefits – By State

Louisiana BAH Rates

Yellow Ribbon Schools

 

PAY AND BENEFITS UPDATES FOR 2019:

Military Benefits Updates for 2019

BAH Rates 2019

Military to Receive Pay Raise in 2019

Military Pay Dates 2019

USAA Pay Dates 2019

Navy Federal Pay Dates

National Guard Pay and Reserve Pay

 

 

Kentucky Veterans Benefits & Disabled Veterans Benefits

The following are the Kentucky veterans’ benefits programs for 2018 and 2019 in the areas of education, employment, housing and healthcare.

Kentucky Veterans’ Benefits

Education Benefits for Kentucky Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the state of Kentucky.

Kentucky Tuition Waiver Benefits

A waiver of tuition is an education benefit provided by the Commonwealth of Kentucky in recognition of military service of certain Kentucky veterans.

The tuition waiver is provided for:

  • children
  • stepchildren
  • adopted children
  • spouses
  • unremarried widows & widowers.

An approved tuition waiver means a student may attend any two-year, four-year or vocational technical schools that are operated and funded by the Kentucky Department of Education.

Private or out of state schools do not qualify for the Tuition Waiver.

You may qualify if one of the following is true of the veteran:

  • Died on active duty
  • Died as a direct result of a service connected disability as determined by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
  • 100% service connected disabled
  • Totally disabled (non-service connected) with wartime service as deemed by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs or Department of Defense
  • Is deceased and lived in KY at time of death and served during a wartime period
  • Award from Social Security Administration is not acceptable

Find colleges in Kentucky with our School Finder.  Use the filters to sort schools by state.

Housing

Homeless Veterans Program

The KDVA’s Homeless Veterans Program provides assistance to veterans who are homeless or who might be at risk of becoming homeless. They provide two types of assistance, emergency, and resource location assistance. With emergency assistance, KDVA is authorized by law to provide one-time cash assistance to veterans to obtain or maintain rental housing or to use for vital utilities such as electricity, gas, or water. With resource location assistance, KDVA can help with locating resources such as shelters, food pantries, and drug rehab programs for veterans and their families in their area.

Property Tax Exemption

Homeowners that are 65 years old or older, or those who are totally disabled as determined by a government agency in Kentucky may receive a property tax exemption of up to $37,600 on his or her primary residence.

Health Care

Kentucky has four long-term skilled nursing facilities for veterans. These homes are meant to serve Kentucky’s veterans by fostering independence, preserving dignity and providing compassionate care. In order to apply, the veteran will need to have an other than dishonorable discharge, be a resident of Kentucky prior to submitting an application, be disabled by reason of diseases, wounds, age or otherwise in need of nursing care. A person would not be eligible if they have been diagnosed by a qualified health professional as acutely mentally ill, as an acute alcoholic, as addicted to drugs, as continually disruptive, or as a danger to self or others or if they are ventilator dependent or have needs that cannot be met by the Veterans’ Center.

The Veterans’ Centers are located in four different locations in Kentucky. One is in Wilmore, one in Hazard, one in Hanson, and one in Radcliff.

Veterans Treatment Courts

The Veterans Treatment Courts are in Jefferson and Fayette counties. They are specialized courts that focus on the unique needs of veterans that have substance abuse or mental health problems. They work with the local drug court, county attorney, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and social service agencies.

Employment Benefits for Kentucky Veterans

Employment KYVETS

The Employment KYVETS is the Kentucky Veterans Employment Training and Support Program. They provide resources and support to help assist veterans across Kentucky in gainful employment as well as training services. They use a database to help match employment seeking veterans with veteran seeking employers.

Veterans Preference Points in Public Hiring

 Veterans as well as certain family members will be able to receive preference points that will be added to civil service exam results. Five points will be added to those who are honorably discharged from the military as well as former Guard and Reserve members. Ten points will be added to those with service-connected disabilities and their unmarried spouses. Ten points will also be given to dependent spouses and parents of war veterans who served honorably and died while on active duty.

Other Kentucky Veterans’ Programs

Womens Veterans Program

The Womens Veterans Program has a mission to ensure that Kentucky’s women veterans have equitable access to federal and state veterans’ services and benefits. This program provides assistance to women who have served in the US Armed Forces, or in forces incorporated as part of the US Armed Forces and who were discharged under conditions other than dishonorable. The program works with federal, state, and local agencies on issues that are related to women veterans. It also performs outreach to improve awareness of eligibility for services and benefits, assesses the needs of women veterans with respect to benefits and services, makes recommendations to the commissioner to improve benefits and services, and incorporates women veterans’ issues in strategic planning concerning benefits and services.

Veterans Program Trust Fund

The VPTF was established by the Kentucky Vietnam Veterans’ Bonus Act in 1988. This trust is to direct funding to projects and programs that help Kentucky’s veterans when other funds are not available. It is overseen by a board of directors whose members are approved by the governor. One example is the University of Louisville’s free behavioral health treatment for traumatized children of military families. Construction of a statue, renovation of an existing structure, entertainment costs, maintenance costs associated with a VSO, or any program already funded by the state or federal government are expressly prohibited. Continuing maintenance and upkeep of any kind, salaries of an organization, travel costs to attend seminars, conference, or other meetings, or any costs associated with entertainment are impliedly prohibited.

Veterans Retirement Pay

If a veteran retired in 1997 or before, all of their retired military pay is exempt from taxes. If they retired after 1997, their pay is subject to state tax if their income exceeds, $41,110.

For more information regarding Kentucky veterans benefits, please visit – Kentucky Dept. of Veterans’ Affairs website

 

Related state military and veteran information:

State Veterans’ Benefits – By State

Kentucky BAH Rates

Yellow Ribbon Schools

 

PAY AND BENEFITS UPDATES FOR 2019:

Military Benefits Updates for 2019

BAH Rates 2019

Military to Receive Pay Raise in 2019

Military Pay Dates 2019

USAA Pay Dates 2019

Navy Federal Pay Dates 2019

National Guard Pay and Reserve Pay

 

 

 

Illinois Veterans Benefits

There are many federal programs for veterans, but there are also programs for veterans in the state of Illinois.  The following are the Illinois veterans’ benefits programs.

Education Benefits for Illinois’ Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the states.

Educational Opportunities for Children (10-18 Yrs)

Financial aid is provided to each child between the ages of 10 and 18 years of a veteran who died or became totally disabled as a result of service in the Armed Forces during World War I, or II, the Korean and Vietnam Conflicts, the Gulf War, and OIF/OEF.

The financial aid applies to a state educational institution of elementary grade, high school or vocational training school.

MIA/POW Scholarship

Dependents of a veteran who has been declared by the Department of Defense or U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to be a POW/MIA, died as the result of a service-connected disability, or permanently disabled from service-connected causes with 100% disability; and, who was an Illinois resident or was an Illinois resident within six months of entering service may be eligible for the scholarship.

Eligible dependents are entitled to full payment of tuition and certain fees to any state supported Illinois institution of higher learning consisting of the equivalent of four (4) calendar years of full-time enrollment including summer terms (i.e., 120 points).

Illinois Veterans’ Grant

The Illinois Veteran Grant (IVG) Program pays tuition and certain fees at all Illinois state-supported colleges, universities and community colleges for Illinois residents. An individual must:

  • be an honorably discharged veteran; and
  • reside in Illinois six months before entering the service; and
  • have at least one full year of active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces which includes veterans who were assigned to active duty in a foreign country in a time of hostilities in that country, regardless of length of service; and
  • return to Illinois within six months of discharge from the service.

Illinois National Guard Grant

The Illinois National Guard (ING) Grant pays tuition and eligible fees (registration, graduation, general activity, matriculation and term fees) at all Illinois public universities or public community colleges. Recipients who have completed less than 10 years of active duty ING service may accumulate up to 120 eligibility units. Recipients who have completed more than 10 years of active duty ING service may accumulate up to 180 eligibility units.

Children of Veterans Scholarship

Each county in the state shall be entitled, annually, to one honorary scholarship at the University of Illinois, for the benefit of children of veterans of WWI, WWII, Korean War, the Vietnam Conflict and any time on or after August 2, 1990 and until those persons in service are no longer eligible for the Southwest Asia Service Medal. Preference is given to the children of deceased and disabled veterans. Such children shall be entitled to receive, without charge for tuition, instruction in any or all departments of the University for a term of at least four (4) consecutive years. Details may be obtained from the University’s Financial Aid Office.

Find colleges in Illinois with our School Finder.  Use the filters to sort schools by state.

Housing Benefits for Illinois’ Veterans

Returning Veterans’ Homestead Exemption

The Returning Veterans’ Homestead Exemption provides a one-time $5,000 reduction to a homes’ equalized assessed value (EAV) for qualifying veterans. Those veterans who return from active duty in an armed conflict involving the US Armed Forces can file an application to receive this exemption.

Disabled Veterans’ Standard Homestead Exemption

The Disabled Veterans’ Standard Homestead Exemption will provide a reduction in a property’s EAV for a qualifying property that is owned by a veteran with a service-connected disability. Those who have a 30% but less than 50% service-connected disability rating will receive a $2,500 homestead exemption. Those with a 50% but less than 70% rating will receive a $5,000 one. Those with a 70% or more rating are exempt from paying property taxes on their primary residence.

The unmarried surviving spouse of a service-connected veteran provided that the veteran was in receipt of the exemption before they died, can also qualify. Any unmarried surviving spouse of a service member killed in the line of duty is exempt from paying property taxes on their primary residence.

Veterans and surviving spouses will need to file an annual application by their counties’ deadline to continue to receive this exemption.

Related: VA Disability Benefits and Pay

Specially Adapted Housing Tax Exemption

This exemption is for the assessed value of real property for which federal funds have been used for the purchase or construction of specially adapted housing. The exemption is valid for as long as the veteran, spouse, or the unmarried surviving spouse resides on the property. Service-connected disabled veterans can receive federal and state financial assistance for the purpose of acquiring or remodeling suitable dwelling units with special fixtures or moveable facilities that are necessary because of the veteran’s permanent and total service-connected disabilities as determined by the US Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

Tax Exemption for Mobile Home

Veterans are exempt from the full amount of the mobile home tax. The mobile home must be owned and used exclusively by a disabled veteran or be a spouse or unmarried surviving spouse and use the mobile home as their primary residence. The disabled veteran must also have been awarded the Specially Adapted Housing Grant by the US Department of Veterans Affairs for a primary residence that they owned and resided in prior to purchase of the mobile home, and the disabled veteran, spouse, or unmarried surviving spouse must be a permanent resident of the State of Illinois on January 1st of the tax year for which the exemption is being claimed.

Healthcare Benefits for Illinois’ Veterans

Group Veterans’ Homes

Illinois has Veterans’ Homes at Anna, LaSalle, Manteno, and Quincy. The IDVA provides quality skilled care and a homelike environment to aging veterans at each of the four homes. Veterans who served during a period of war are given precedence in admission. Peacetime veterans, spouses, surviving spouses, and Gold Star parents are also eligible.

In addition to serving during wartime or peacetime, a veteran will need to have entered the service as a resident of Illinois or have been a resident of Illinois for one year immediately preceding the date of application for admission and are disabled by disease, wounds, or otherwise and because of that disability are incapable of earning a living.

Employment Benefits for Illinois’ Veterans

Mission: Veteran Entrepreneurship

Veteran Entrepreneurship is an IDVA and CMS jointly-led initiative that brings together pertinent government agencies, educational institutions, trade associations, business sector experts, and employers to educate returning service members and veterans with resources and advancement opportunities available to veteran-owned businesses. They can help veterans start their own business and assist existing veteran-owned businesses.

State Procurement Benefits for Veteran-Owned Businesses

The Illinois Veterans Business Program (IVBP) state agencies and universities are encouraged to spend at least 3% of their procurement budgets with certified veteran-owned businesses. Eligible businesses include companies with an annual gross sales under 75 million that are 51% owned by one or more qualified veterans or qualified service-disabled veterans living in Illinois.

Veterans’ Preference

Illinois has veterans’ preference with state employment. Under the state law, qualified veterans must be considered for interviews and employment before non-veterans in the same grade category.

Other Benefits for Illinois’ Veterans

Bonus Payments

The following bonus payments are for veterans who were residents of  Illinois for 12 months immediately prior to entering military service. They also need to have had an honorable discharge from the military.

World War II

If a veteran served at least 60 days on active duty between September 16, 1940 and September 3, 1945, they can receive a bonus of $10 per month for domestic service, and $15 per month for foreign service. Survivors are entitled to a benefit of $1,000 if the veteran’s death was service-connected and a result of hostile action with enemy forces.

Korean War

There is a $100 bonus payment to veterans who served in Korea between June 27, 1950 and July 27, 1953 and received the Korean Service Medal.

Vietnam War

There is a $100 bonus for veterans who received the Vietnam Service Medal or Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal for Vietnam and served during one of the following periods: Vietnam: January 1, 1961 through March 28, 1973 or Vietnam Frequent Wind: April 29, 30, 1975. Survivors are also entitled to a benefit of $1,000 if the veteran’s death was classified as a service-connected by the US Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

Persian Gulf

There is a $100 bonus for veterans who served between August 2, 1990 to November 30, 1995 and received the Southwest Asia Service Medal.

The Global War on Terrorism

This is a $100 bonus for veterans who served on or after September 11, 2001. They must also have served at least 30 consecutive or 60 non consecutive days of foreign or sea service and be in receipt of one of the following medals: Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Iraq Campaign Medal, and Afghanistan Campaign Medal.

POW compensation

For those who were taken and held prisoner by hostile forces in Southeast Asia, and were on active duty or employed by the US Government on or after January 1, 1961, can receive $50 for each month or portion thereof while being held captive.

Global War on Terrorism Survivors Compensation

There is a $3,000 compensation benefit that is payable to survivors of military personnel killed in action by terrorist acts or hostile activities during the performance of military service in periods recognized as wartime by a United States campaign or service medals. The service member would have needed to have had a residency of Illinois of at least one year before entering military service.

For more information regarding Illinois veterans’ benefits, please go here.

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Idaho Veterans Benefits & Disabled Veterans Benefits

The following are the Idaho veterans’ benefits programs for education, employment, housing and heathcare for 2018 and 2019.

Idaho Veterans’ Benefits 2019

Education Benefits for Idaho’s Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the state of Idaho.

Idaho Army National Guard

Soldiers who complete basic training and are in a drilling status can receive up to $5,000 each year in state tuition assistance and associated costs through the program for educational purposes ranging from undergraduate degrees to vocational certifications

Find colleges in Idaho with our School Finder.  Use the filters to sort schools by state.

Housing Benefits for Idaho’s Veterans

Property Tax Reductions and Exemptions (Circuit Breaker)

Veterans who have a 10% or greater service-connected disability or those who receive a pension from Veterans Affairs for a non-service-connected disability can qualify for the Circuit Breaker when they meet the residency and income requirements.

Veterans Property Tax Reduction

Veterans who have a 100% service-connected disability may apply to reduce their property taxes by as much as $1,320. They will need to have owned and lived in a home in Idaho that was their primary residence before April 15, 2019. The property must have a current homeowner’s exemption. The property can also be a mobile home.

Healthcare Benefits for Idaho’s Veterans

Idaho Veterans Home

There are three veterans homes in Idaho. All three have the goal of providing responsive medical and supportive care to veterans who can no longer provide for themselves. The environment that supports privacy, independence, comfort and security, while also meeting their social needs.

The veterans homes are in Boise with a 131 bed skilled nursing unit, 36 bed residential unit, and a special care unit. The homes in Lewiston and Pocatello each have 66 bed skilled nursing facilities.

Applicants need:

  • To be peacetime or wartime veterans, or a spouse, where wartime veterans having priority.
  • To have served at least 90 days, with a honorable discharge.
  • To be a resident of a State of Idaho at the time of applying.
  • To apply or be in receipt of a VA pension, and Aid and Attendance.
  • To be eligible and apply for Medicaid benefits or pay the current maximum monthly charge.

Financial Assistance

There is a $1,000 grant for wartime veterans in need of assistance in the cases of extreme emergency. The veteran will have needed to have entered the military from Idaho, or have lived within the state for at least five years. The event or the emergency will have needed to have occurred within 90 days of the request.

Employment Benefits for Idaho’s Veterans

Public Employee Veterans Hiring Preference

Veterans can earn preference points if they have been in active service in the military, other than active duty for training. Veterans who have served on active duty in the armed services, with an honorable discharge and who have a present service-connected disability of 10% or more, or are a Purple Heart recipient can also receive points. The points are added to the veteran’s final passing score. The points can not be used for promotions, transfers, or reassignments. They will only be added for the veteran’s initial hire.

Veterans who are discharged under honorable conditions, and the widow or widower of a preference eligible veteran, as long as they remained unmarried, are eligible for five preference points. Disabled veterans who have a present service-connected disability of 10% or more, or are Purple Heart recipients are eligible for 10 points. Widows or widowers of those who qualify can also receive the 10 points. A spouse of a veteran who is unable to qualify for any public employment because of a service-connected disability can also claim this preference.

A disabled veteran who was discharged under honorable conditions, who served on active duty in the armed forces at any time, and who has a service-connected disability of 30% or more shall be offered an interview in they are one of the top ten qualified applicants.

Professional License

If a person holds an occupational or professional license issued by the State of Idaho and are serving in the Armed Forces of the United States, they shall be exempt form the payment of any professional or occupational licence or renewal fee required by any law of the state for the period they are engaged in military service and for six months following their discharge from military service.

State Income Tax Exemption

If an active duty service member is stationed outside of the State of Idaho, they are exempt from Idaho state income tax.

State Income Tax Retired Military Pay Benefit Deduction

A veteran who is 65 years old or older, or their unmarried widow or widower, or those who are disabled and age 62 or older, receiving veteran retirement benefits, are eligible for a military pay benefit deduction. The deductible amount of retirement benefits must be reduced by retirement benefits paid under the Federal Social Security Act or the Tier 1 Federal Railroad Retirement Act. The maximum amount allowed is different for each year.

 

For more information regarding Idaho veterans benefits, please visit – Idaho Division of Veterans Services

 

Related state military and veteran information:

State Veterans’ Benefits – By State

Idaho BAH Rates

Yellow Ribbon Schools

 

Hawaii Veterans Benefits & Disabled Veterans Benefits

The following are the Hawaii veterans’ benefits programs in 2018.

Education Benefits for Hawaii’s Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the state of Hawaii.

The Hawaii Army National Guard State Tuition Assistance Program (STAP)

Offers tuition waivers for eligible soldiers who have completed Basic Combat Training and Advanced Individual Training. The waiver covers 100% of your tuition if you are a community college student, and 50% of your tuition if you are a four-year university student.

Find colleges in Hawaii with our School Finder.  Use the filters to sort schools by state.

Housing Benefits for Hawaii’s Veterans

Hawaii does offer awards for qualifying veterans with disabilities. The VA housing award will give qualified veterans with a payment up to $5,000 for remodeling or purchasing a handicap accessible home. There are also additional programs that can provide tax exemptions on real property owned by veterans with disabilities or the surviving spouses of disabled service members. The Award of payment is pending the availability of state funds and veteran affairs approval.

There are also tax exemptions on passenger cars when they are owned by totally disabled veterans and subsidized by the Department of Veterans Affairs. This benefit does vary by island.

Healthcare Benefits for Hawaii’s Veterans

The Yukio Okutsu State Veterans Home

Hawaii does have a veterans home called the Yukio Okutsu State Veterans Home in Hilo. This is the first and only veterans home in Hawaii. The home has large private rooms and semi-private suites. They have weekly events such as live music and movie nights.

In order to be admitted to the veterans home you would need to qualify with this criteria:

  • The applicant must be a veteran in good standing, meet the general eligibility for VA benefits, and be over 55 years of age.
  • The applicant needs to be a resident of the state of Hawaii before he or she joined the military, and/or a resident of the state of Hawaii for more than a year before apply for the veterans home.
  • The applicant will need to require skilled nursing care.

Spouses might be eligible for applying depending on space at the facility.

RELATED LINKS:

How to Become A Nurse as a Military Spouse

Hot Degrees: Nursing

Employment Benefits for Hawaii’s Veterans

Employment Preference For Civil Service

A veteran can receive Preference Points for Open Competitive Recruitments in Civil Service. A veteran can receive 5 points if they are not disabled, 10 points if they are a disabled veteran. The veteran will need to submit proof of their military service and disability.

Office of Veterans Affairs

The Hawaii Office of Veterans Affairs primary service is advocacy. They can take action on behalf of veterans , their families, and survivors to make sure they are able to get the appropriate rights, benefits, and services. They also offer short-term counseling, Informational and referral, VA claims, forms, and appeals assistance, Outreach, VA benefits assistance, and Burial assistance.

For more information regarding Hawaii veterans benefits, please visit – Hawaii Office of Veterans Services

 

Related state military and veteran information:

State Veterans’ Benefits – By State

Hawaii BAH Rates

Yellow Ribbon Schools

 

 

 

Georgia Veterans Benefits & Disabled Veteran Benefits

The following are the Georgia veterans’ benefits programs for education, housing, healthcare and employment.

Education Benefits for Georgia Veterans

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the states.

Georgia National Guard Education Benefits

100% tuition at state schools (or up to $2,174 per semester at other approved schools).

Scholarship up to $2,000/year for 4 years.

Tuition waiver is accomplished through a service-cancelable loan. As long as student remains a Georgia Guardsman in good standing, tuition is waived.

No additional service is required beyond the current semester.

Scholarship is for Georgia Guardsman/Reservist (or the spouse/child of one) who is a combat veteran deployed on/after 1 Feb 2003.

> Find VA-approved colleges and universities in Georgia with our School Finder

Housing Benefits for Georgia Veterans

Disabled Veteran Homestead Tax Exemption

This is available to honorably discharged Georgia veterans who are considered disabled. They must also own their own home and use that home as their primary residence. The exemption also applies to surviving unremarried spouses and minor children as long as they remain in the homestead or a subsequent homestead in the same county.

To be considered disabled for the purpose of this tax exemption, you need to be VA-rated at 100% disabled, less than 100% disabled but being paid at the 100% rate because of unemployability, entitled to receive a statutory award from the VA for loss or permanent loss of one or both feet, one or both hands, loss of sight in one of both eyes, or permanent impairment of both eyes. They can also be the surviving, unmarried spouse of qualified deceased veterans, or surviving minor children of qualified deceased veterans.

The amount of this exemption is the greater of $32,500 or the maximum amount allowable under 38 U.S.C. 2101. You will need to apply to a GDVS Veterans Field Service Office.

Healthcare Benefits for Georgia Veterans

State War Veterans Homes

Georgia has two skilled nursing care homes for eligible war veterans that live in Georgia. They are located in Augusta and the other in Milledgeville. The primary mission of the homes is to provide high quality skilled nursing care to veterans while they seek to improve their quality of life and their overall health. A veteran must be a current Georgia resident and have been residing in Georgia for two years immediately preceding the date of application or have resided in Georgia for five or more of the past 15 years.

The veteran will also have needed to have served on active duty in the US Armed Forces during one of these wartime periods: World War II December 7, 1941-December 31, 1946, Korea June 27th, 1950-January 31st, 1955, Cold War January 31, 1955-August 1, 1990, Vietnam July 1, 1964- May 7, 1975, and the Persian Gulf August 2, 1990-present.

The veteran will also need to have a discharge from the US military for other than dishonorable conditions. They must be approved as eligible for skilled nursing care by the US Department of Veterans Affairs, free of contagious infectious disease as well as behavioral and psychiatric problems, and must not need to be sustained by line-operated mechanical means.

Employment Benefits for Georgia Veterans

Income Taxes for Combat Deaths

Service personnel who die as a result of wounds, diseases, or injury because of serving in a combat zone as a member of the US military will be exempt from all Georgia taxes for the taxable year of their death. Such taxes shall also not apply on any prior taxable year ending on or after the first day served in a combat zone.

Business Certification of Exemption

Those who are Georgia veterans are eligible for an exemption from any occupation tax, administrative fee, or a regulatory fee that is imposed by local governments. These can be imposed for peddling, conducting a business, or practicing a profession or semi-profession.

The veteran would need to be discharged under honorable conditions, have a service-connected disability rating of 10% (wartime veterans) or 25% (peacetime veterans,) and have income that is not liable for state income taxes in order to qualify for this exemption.

Employment Preference

There is a 5 point credit for war veterans that are seeking employment with the state of Georgia. There is a 10 point credit for veterans with a VA service-connected disability rating of 10% or more.

Returning Veterans Task Force

The Returning Veterans Task Force (RVTF) is an intra-state task force that investigates how Georgia’s state government agencies can coordinate services that can better assist service members transitioning from active duty back into society. The RVTF has 13 member agencies and organizations including GDVS.

Workforce Division of the Georgia Department of Economic Development

The Workforce Division of the Georgia Department of Economic Development is a program that offers assistance and tools to help veterans translate their military occupational classifications into civilian jobs and search for career opportunities with employers who have pledged to hire veterans.

For more information regarding Georgia veterans benefits, please visit – Georgia Department of Veterans Service website

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Florida Veteran & Disabled Veteran Benefits

Florida Benefits for Veterans and Disabled Veterans

The following are the Florida veterans’ benefits programs for education, housing, healthcare and employment.

Education Benefits for Veterans in Florida

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the states.

Florida Purple Heart Waiver

Florida waives undergraduate-level tuition at state universities, community colleges, and career and technical training facilities for Florida recipients of the Purple Heart and higher combat decorations in superior precedence.

Here’s what the means. If you have a Purple Heart or any of the following medals, you are eligible:

    • Purple Heart
    • Bronze Star with “V” device
    • Distinguished Flying Cross
    • Legion of Merit with “V” device
    • Silver Star
    • Air Force Cross
    • Navy Cross
    • Distinguished Service Cross
    • Medal of Honor

The Purple Heart Waiver covers tuition and fees required for a degree or certificate program from the Florida College System. The waiver allows for up to 110% of the required hours for any program of study.

The Purple Heart Waiver does NOT cover costs like textbooks, housing, and food. Students can study either full- or part-time.

You must submit documentation showing you received a Purple Heart (or higher), and that you were a Florida resident at the time of the military action that led to the combat decoration.

Florida Undergraduate Tuition Waiver

Additionally, Florida waives out of state tuition fees for all honorably discharged veterans who reside in the state. The Congressman C.W. Bill Young Tuition Waiver Program instituted this great opportunity.

This waiver only applies to those veterans enrolled in Florida public universities and post-secondary institutions. This waiver does not apply to private universities.

The Tuition Waiver Program also extends to spouses and dependent children who live in Florida and are using GI Bill benefits at Florida’s public institutions.

To find out more about Florida’s education benefits, follow the link.

Education for Children ff Deceased or Disabled Florida Veterans

Florida provides four-year college educational opportunities for dependent children and spouses of veterans who died from a service connected disability or who are 100% percent service-connected totally and permanently disabled veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces.

For more information, call toll free (888) 827-2004. Dependent children of service members Missing In Action or Prisoners Of War may also be eligible for tuition benefits. Or, you can email osfa@fldoe.org for more information.

Florida also offers a Children and Spouses of Deceased or Disabled Veterans (CSDDV) Scholarship Program. This program is available to eligible dependents and qualified veterans. The Florida Department of Veterans Affairs (FDVA) presented CSDDV Overview which provides further information.

RELATED: Tuition Assistance for Service Members

Florida Tuition Assistance

Florida has an independent tuition assistance program called the Educational Dollars for Duty program.

 

Find Your Fit with GI Bill-approved Schools in Florida!

 

The “Educational Dollars for Duty” (EDD) Program

For Florida National Guard Soldiers and Airmen, and can provide public tuition for the period of the Guard member’s service.

Educational Dollars for Duty will pay up to 100 percent of public tuition and will pay private tuition at the average Florida state school public tuition rate.

For more information regarding Florida veterans benefits, please visit Florida’s Department of Military Affairs. Or, you can contact the State Education Program Administrator at (904) 823-0339.

Veterans High School Diplomas

In 2013, the Florida State Legislature granted the Commissioner of Education the ability to award high school diplomas to honorably discharged veterans who haven’t completed high school.

To be eligible, a veteran must meet the following criteria:

    1. The veteran left a high school program from any state, prior to graduation, and entered the armed forces.
    2. The veteran is a current resident of Florida, or was previously enrolled in any high school within the state.
    3. Is honorably discharged from the military.

For more information, call (850) 245-0446.

 

>> Need ways to pay for college?  Search scholarships for military, veterans, spouses and dependents with the CollegeRecon Scholarship Finder.

 

Housing Benefits for Florida Veterans

The following are housing benefits for veterans who live in Florida.

Homestead Tax Exemptions For Veterans

Veterans who have been honorably discharged and also have a rated service-connected, permanent and total disability, as well as being a permanent resident of the state of Florida as of January 1st of the tax year for which the exemption is being claimed, are exempted from taxation for any real estate owned and used as a homestead.

If the spouse of a deceased veteran holds the legal or beneficial title to the homestead and permanently resides there, the exemption will carry over until he or she remarries, sells, or otherwise disposes of the property. In the event they sell the property, an exemption, not to exceed the amount granted from the most recent ad valorem tax roll, may be transferred to the new residence as long as it is used as their primary residence and they do not remarry.

If a veteran is disabled, over 65 years of age, and owns homestead property, they may qualify for a property tax discount based on their percentage of disability. This will be in addition to any other exemptions veterans now receive. The veteran will need to be honorably discharged from the military and be partially disabled with a permanent service-connected disability, where at least part of it must be combat related.

Any real estate that is owned and used as a homestead by the surviving spouse of a member of the armed forces who died from a service-connected cause while on active duty, can be exempt from taxation if the member was a permanent resident of Florida as of January 1st of the year the member died.

Eligible veterans who are residents of the state of Florida that have a VA certified service-connected disability of 10% or greater shall be entitled to a $5,000 homestead property tax exemption. If the veteran is deceased, the benefit will go to the spouse as long as they were married for at least five years. If the spouse does sell the property, it can be transferred to the new residence if they use it as their primary residence and it doesn’t exceed the amount granted in the most recent ad valorem tax roll.

Real Estate Tax Exemption for Disabled Veterans

Veterans who are paraplegic, hemiplegic, permanently and totally disabled, must use a wheelchair for mobility, or are legally blind, are exempt from real estate taxation if their gross annual household income does not exceed the adjusted maximum allowed. The veteran will need to check with their local property appraiser to determine if their gross annual household income qualifies.

G.I. Home Loan Guarantee

The VA can guarantee part of your loan toward the purchase of a home, condominium , or manufactured home.

Furthermore, veterans with a conventional home loan have the option to refinance to a VA-guaranteed loan. The Veterans’ Benefits Improvement Act of 2008 authorized veterans the opportunity to access VA home loans from a conventional loan program.

For more information, visit the VA Home Loan Benefits page, or call (888) 244-6711.

 

>> Interested in housing in or near Florida?  For a no-obligation, free consultation regarding your VA Loan eligibility, please go here.

 

Healthcare Benefits for Florida Veterans

The following are healthcare benefits for veterans who live in Florida.

Free Health Care for Combat Veterans

Combat veterans who have been released from active duty on or after January 8th, 2003, are eligible to enroll in the VA health care system for five years from the date of discharge.

This also applies to reservists and members of the National Guard who served in combat operations. To be eligible, veterans must have any discharge status except “dishonorable”.

There are 8 VA Medical Centers (VAMC) in Florida:

    1. Gainesville: Malcom Randall VAMC
    2. Jacksonville: Jacksonville Navy VAMC
    3. Lake City: Lake City VAMC
    4. Miami: Miami VA Healthcare System
    5. Orlando: Orlando VAMC
    6. Tampa: James A. Haley Veterans Hospital
    7. Tampa: James A. Haley Primary Care Annex
    8. West Palm Beach: West Palm Beach VAMC

These are just the medical centers. However, there are countless outpatient clinics and veterans centers throughout the state. Check out all of Florida’s VA Healthcare options.

Veteran Integrated Service Networks (VISN)

To deliver health care service to veterans, the Department of Veterans Affairs created 21 regional VISNs nationwide. There are two that serve Florida:

      • VISN 8 – Serves 60 counties in North, Central and South Florida, 19 rural counties in South Georgia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
      • VISN 16 – Serves the remaining counties in Northwest Florida.

Follow the link to each VISN to discover more information about the services available to Florida’s veteran community.

Florida State Veterans’ Homes

There are six skilled nursing facilities and one assisted listing facility operated by the Florida Department of Veterans’ Affairs. All of the facilities are licensed by the Agency for Healthcare Administration and are inspected by the AHCA and the US Department of Veterans Affairs on an annual basis. The homes are supervised by round the clock registered and licensed nurses.

In order to be admitted to one of the Florida State Veterans’ Homes, the veteran will need to have an honorable discharge, have Florida residency, and have a certification of need of assisted living or skilled nursing care as determined by a VA physician.

The Florida Veterans’ Homes are:

    1. Robert H. Jenkins Jr. Veterans’ Domiciliary Home in Lake City
    2. Emory L. Bennett State Veterans’ Nursing Home in Daytona Beach
    3. Baldomero Lopez State Veterans’ Nursing Home in Land O’ Lakes
    4. Alexander “Sandy” Nininger State Veterans’ Nursing Home in Pembroke Pines
    5. Clifford C. Sims State Veterans’ Nursing Home in Panama City
    6. Douglas T. Jacobson State Veterans’ Nursing Home in Port Charlotte
    7. Clyde E. Lassen State Veterans’ Nursing Home in St. Augustine
    8. Ardie R. Copas State Veterans’ Nursing Home in Port St. Lucie

Employment Benefits for Florida Veterans

The following are employment benefits for veterans who live in Florida.

Florida Service-Disabled Veteran Business Enterprise Opportunity

Any state agency, when they are considering two or more bids, proposals, or replies for the procurement of commodities or contractual services, where at least one of the bids is from a certified service-disabled Veteran business enterprise, that are equal with respect to all relevant considerations, including price, quality, and service, shall award such procurement or contract to the certified service-disabled veteran business enterprise.

Employment Preference

Eligible veterans are able to receive preference at every stage of the hiring process. Ten points will be added to the score of the first category of applicants, which are disabled veterans, and spouses of disabled or missing veterans. Five points will be added to the score of other preference-eligible applicants. Disabled veterans with a disability ratings of 30% or more will be placed on the register or employment list first, followed by all other preference-eligible applications in order of their augmented ratings.

To be considered an eligible veteran, you will need to be a veteran with a service-connected disability who is eligible for or receiving compensation, disability retirement, or a pension administered by the US Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense. Spouses of veterans who cannot qualify for employment because of a total and permanent service-connected disability or a spouse of a veteran who is missing in action, captured, or forcibly detained by a foreign power are also eligible. A veteran of any war who have served on active duty for one day or more, during a wartime period, to exclude active duty for training and an unmarried Widow or Widower of a veteran who died of a service-connected disability will also be eligible.

Occupational License Tax Exemption

A disabled wartime veteran who is unable to perform manual labor and his or her unremarried spouse, shall be exempt from the Occupational License Tax. The veteran or their surviving spouse need to be residents of Florida.

Florida Department of Economic Opportunity and the CareerSource Florida Network

Florida Department of Economic Opportunity and the CareerSource Florida Network offers employment services for veterans, military members, and their families. The services they provide include interview preparation, resume writing assistance, job and training referrals, career planning, vocational guidance, job search and placement assistance, and internet access.

Employ Florida Vets

Employ Florida Vets is the state’s dedicated online portal for military veterans in order to access employment services.

Business License Fee Waivers for Veterans and Their Spouses

The Department of Business and Professional Regulation can waive the initial licencing fee, the initial application fee, and the initial unlicensed activity fee for military veterans as well as their spouses at the time of discharge. They will need to apply to the Department for a state professional license within 60 months after the veteran has been honorably discharged from the military. This law applies to over 20 professions under DBPR’s jurisdiction.

Health License Fee Waivers for Veterans and Their Spouses

The Florida Department of Health offers expedited health care practitioner licensure through the Veterans Application for Licensure Online Response System (VALOR.) They also offer expanded licensure fee waivers for military veterans and their spouses who apply for health care licensure in Florida. The department also assist the county health departments in recruiting military veterans and spouses to work in health-related fields.

Agriculture and Consumer Services Fee Waivers for Veterans and Their Spouses

The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services will waive first-time licensing application fees for specific veterans of the US military, their spouses or a business entity where the veteran or spouse has a majority ownership stake.

 

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Delaware Veterans Benefits

The following are the Delaware veterans’ benefits programs for 2018 and 2019.  These include programs in the areas of housing, health care, employment and education.

Delaware Veterans’ Benefits

Education Benefits for Veterans in Delaware

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the states.

Education Benefits for Active Members of the Delaware National Guard

Any active member of a federally recognized unit of the Delaware National Guard, who meets the requirements for satisfactory membership as defined by the Adjutant General of the Delaware National Guard, shall be eligible for funding support by the Delaware National Guard for certain post-secondary education tuition and fees up to 100%.

RELATED: National Guard Tuition Assistance

Find colleges in Delaware with our School Finder.  Use the filters to sort schools by state.

Education Benefits for Children of Deceased Veterans

Children of military members who was killed while on active duty or who died from disease, wounds, injuries or disabilities arising or resulting from performance of duty as well as children of POW/MIA members are eligible for up to four years of free college.

The college doesn’t need to be in the state of Delaware.

The child must be between 16 – 24 years old and a resident of Delaware for at least three years prior to the date of application

RELATED: Scholarships for Gold Star Families

Housing Benefits for Veterans in Delaware

Delaware Joining Forces

The Delaware Joining Forces network is to help improve the quality of life and welfare for military service members, veterans, and their families in the state of Delaware. They provide help with financial and legal assistance, job training and employment, homelessness and housing, behavioral health and wellness, and education.

The network is made up of state agencies, as well as external service providers who proactively work together to provide solutions for military members, veterans, and their families. This network is a collaborative effort led by the Delaware National Guard, Delaware Health and Social Services, and the Delaware Commission of Veterans Affairs (DCVA.)

Health Care Benefits for Veterans in Delaware

Delaware Veterans Home

The Delaware Veterans Home was established in 2007 and is at 100 Delaware Veterans Blvd. in Milford, Delaware. This home is a 150 bed long-term care facility that offers skilled nursing services as well as a special needs unit to serve those who suffer from dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease.

In order to be able to use this home, a veteran will need to have been honorably discharged from active service, be a national guard service member or be a reservist who is eligible for retirement pay at age 60,  or a veteran who has served on active duty at least 180 days. Those days do not have to be consecutive. The veteran must also currently reside in the state of Delaware for three years or more prior to their application and also must meet federal and state requirements for needing a skilled nursing home level of care.

Employment Benefits for Veterans in Delaware

Veterans’ Preference

Delaware does have Veterans’ Preference for veterans who have successfully met the minimum qualifications as well as special qualifications for their position. They will be granted the appropriate preference points which will be added to their total ranking score.

Preference will be given to applicants who are veterans of the Armed Forces of the United States who served as an active member and were honorably discharged, or are members of the Delaware National Guard or a Reserve unit located in Delaware, with at least 20 years of membership.

They can also be a spouse of a veteran or member who qualifies who has died, as long as they have not remarried. They can also be a spouse of any member of the armed forces serving on active duty, who is listed in one of these categories for a total of 90 or more days: 1. Missing in action. 2. Captured in the line of duty. 3. Forcibly detained or interned in the line of duty by a foreign government or power. A spouse of any veteran or member that qualifies for veterans preference who has a disability resulting from a service connected disability can also receive this preference..

Veterans’ Preference is confined to original entrance to State Merit employment and not applied to promotions or retention.

10 points will be added to a disabled veterans score, with 5 points added to all other eligible veterans. In the case of the spouse, they would be awarded the amount of points that was entitled to their veteran.

Pension Benefits for Paraplegic Veterans

Any veteran who is a paraplegic, that is eligible for benefits, shall receive a pension from the State of Delaware for $3,000 a year, payable in equal monthly installments. The veteran must file evidence with the Pension office that they are a paraplegic and fully disabled. The disability must be a direct result of service in the Armed Forces of the United States in a period of war.

Veterans Opportunity Credit

If you are an employer and you have hired veterans, you can receive a tax credit. The employer will be eligible for the credit during the year that the qualified veteran is hired and for two taxable years after that. The tax credit will be 10% of the qualified veteran’s wages, up to a maximum of $1,500. A qualified veteran is a veteran who has served in a hostile environment such as Iraq and Afghanistan.

Military Retirement Pay and Taxes

Veterans in Delaware, up to age 60, may exclude up to $2,000 of military retirement pay from state taxes. Those who are 60 or older can exclude up to $12,500.

For more information regarding Delaware veterans benefits, please visit – Delaware Commission of Veterans Affairs

Related state military and veteran information:

 

 

Connecticut Veterans Benefits

The following are the Connecticut veterans’ benefits programs for 2018 and 2019.  Programs include the areas of health care, housing, employment and education.

Connecticut Veterans’ Benefits

Education Benefits for Veterans in Connecticut

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the states.

Veterans Tuition Waiver

Tuition and fees at State Regional Community & Technical Colleges as well as State Universities may be waived for Connecticut resident veterans who served at least 90 days of active duty during a period of war.

A veteran’s dependents can also qualify for the tuition waiver if the veteran is declared missing in action while serving in the armed forces after January 1, 1960.

Find colleges in Connecticut with our School Finder.  Use the filters to sort schools by state.

Connecticut National Guard

100% tuition for members.

RELATED: National Guard Tuition Assistance

Housing Benefits for Veterans in Connecticut

Property Taxes

Veterans who have 90 days of wartime service, to include Merchant Marines who served during WWII, will be eligible for a $1,500 property tax exemption. Veterans who are below a certain income level and/or disabled veterans will be eligible for additional property tax exemptions. Surviving spouses of veterans may also be eligible for this benefit.

Patriots’ Landing Houses

These houses are located on West Street in Rocky Hill. There are five separate single family three bedroom homes that can accommodate veterans, their spouses, and their children. All of the houses are furnished, have kitchen supplies, bedding, furniture, washers and dryers, and full kitchens. All of the houses are smoke free and pets are not allowed but there can be exceptions for verified service animals.

Housing is provided on a month to month basis, not to exceed 12 months unless extended by the DVA. Participants are expected to pay a monthly housing program fee. If you live in these homes, you will be expected to comply with all the terms and conditions listed in the Patriots’ Landing Temporary Housing Program Agreement. A case manager will be assigned to assist couples and families with individual recovery plans to help return them to independent living in the community.

In order to qualify you will need to be a veteran that was honorably discharged from or released under honorable conditions from active service in the Armed Forces and be a current resident of Connecticut or a resident at the time of your enlistment or induction in the Armed Forces.

Health Care Benefits for Veterans in Connecticut

Pretrial Diversionary Programs

This law allows veterans to participate in accelerated rehabilitation twice, instead of just once which is what is normally allowed by law for non-veterans. This program is available for people who are accused of certain crimes or motor vehicle violations. The program also allows the veteran that is participating in the pretrial drug education program or those with certain mental health conditions that are amenable to treatment, be able to be assigned to state and federal Departments of Veterans Affairs Services instead of services from the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services.

Other Than Honorable (OTH) Discharge and State and Municipal Benefits

As of October 1, 2018, benefits that were previously available to veterans who were honorably discharged or released under honorable conditions from military service will now be available to those who received an OTH discharge.

In order to be eligible for this, you would need to be diagnosed with one or more of these:

  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) resulting from military service.
  • A Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) from military service.
  • Experienced military sexual trauma (MST.)

These diagnoses need to be done by someone who is licenced to provide health care services at a United States Department of Veterans Affairs Facility.

Residential Facility

The Residential Facility provides veterans with a community living environment with a continuum of wrap around rehabilitation services and programs. Social Workers, Residential Workers, a Vocational Rehabilitation Coordinator, a Therapeutic Recreation Therapist, as well as Case Managers help assist the veterans in helping develop an individualized plan which will outline their goals and objectives in order to return to independent living.

The services available at the Residential Facility also help with employment and education, social work and case management, collaborative partnerships, recovery support, veteran entertainment and technology, a veteran fitness center, nutritional services, recreations and activities, transportation services, and spiritual and religious services.

In order to qualify you will need to be a veteran that was honorably discharged from or released under honorable conditions from active service in the Armed Forces and be a current resident of Connecticut or a resident at the time of your enlistment or induction in the Armed Forces.

The SGT John L. Levitow Healthcare Center

The SGT John L. Levitow Healthcare Center at the Connecticut Department of Veterans Affairs is licensed by the Connecticut Department of Public Health as a chronic disease hospital that provides long-term care to veterans with chronic and disabling medical conditions.

These conditions include but are not limited to: heart and lung disease, stroke, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and other dementias.

There is a sense of community at the The SGT John L. Levitow Healthcare Center. Veterans live in private or semi-private rooms with en suite bathrooms. There is a highly trained staff that is dedicated to providing compassionate care to help meet the needs of the veterans.

Employment Benefits for Veterans in  Connecticut

CT Veteran Owned Micro Business Certification

Businesses in Connecticut that are a veteran owned micro business shall be afforded a 15% price preference in the determination of the lowest responsible qualified bidder by the Connecticut Department of Administrative Services.

In order to receive that 15%, a veteran would need to first obtain a Veteran-Owned Micro Business Certification from the Connecticut Department of Veterans Affairs. This certification is valid for one year or until a business is no longer in compliance with statutory requirements, whichever comes first.

Retirement Taxes

The Connecticut state law exempts federally taxable military retirement pay from state income tax.

Veterans Agriculture Program

The Veterans Agriculture Program gives a tax incentive to those veterans who start a farming business. The law also relaxes the conditions eligible veterans must meet to qualify for a sales and use tax exemption permit for property used exclusively in commercial agricultural production.

Leaving Employment For Military Service

Any employee who leaves any public authority or public agency to enter the armed forces can be reinstated in their former position as long as they re-apply within 90 days following the receipt of a certificate from the Armed Forces confirming satisfactory service.

State Exams

Wartime veterans that are eligible for receiving VA compensation will receive an additional 10 points on their classified competitve state exams. If you are a wartime veteran that is not eligible for VA compensation or a pension, you will receive 5 additional points. The spouse of an eligible veteran can also qualify.

Either the veteran or the spouse will need to achieve a passing grade on the examination score. If an honorably discharged veteran has served in a military action for which he or she received or is entitled to a campaign badges or expeditionary medal, he or she will receive 5 additional points if they receive a passing grade on the examination.

In addition, for a competitive municipal examination, a wartime veteran that is eligible for VA compensation or a pension, can receive 10 additional points if they receive a passing score. A wartime veteran who is not eligible for VA compensation or pension will receive five.

For more information regarding Alabama veterans benefits, please visit – Connecticut Department of Veterans Affairs

Related state military and veteran information:

 

Colorado Veterans Benefits & Disabled Veterans Benefits

The following are the Colorado state benefits programs for veterans, military and the National Guard.  These programs are included in the areas of housing, health care, employment and education.

Colorado Veterans’ Benefits

Education Benefits for Veterans In Colorado

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are veterans’ benefits programs provided by the states.

Colorado National Guard

Any member of the Colorado National Guard is eligible for state tuition assistance, up to 100% tuition paid at any CO state-funded school depending on funding available. State funding can be used in conjunction with Federal Tuition Assistance.

RELATED: National Guard Tuition Assistance

>> Find VA-approved colleges and universities in Colorado with our School Finder.

Housing Benefits for Veterans In Colorado

Disabled Veteran Property Tax Exemption

This is a program for disabled veterans who are rated by the US Department of Veterans Affairs at 100%, Permanently, are totally disabled by the US Department of Veterans Affairs and have owned and occupied their property since January 1st of the year in which the veteran is applying.

The exemption is 50% of the first 200,000 value of the home. This is only for a primary residence.

Health Care Benefits for Veterans In Colorado

Colorado State Veterans Community Living Centers

There are five Colorado State Veteran Community Living Centers in Aurora, Florence, Monte Vista, Rifle, and Walsenburg. These centers serve honorably discharged veterans, veterans’ spouses and widows, and gold star parents who lost children while serving in the Armed Forces. Those who are residents can enjoy camaraderie of sharing activities and daily life with other veterans, friends, and family.

Each of the five locations offer 24 hour nursing care, meals, physician services restorative therapy, transportation, diversified activities, with an all-inclusive rate.

Employment Benefits for Veterans In Colorado

Career Assistance for Veterans

There is career assistance available to all individuals who are eligible for Veteran’s services. The Colorado Department of Labor and Employment (CDLE) and the American Job Center (AJC) partner together to offer career assistance to those who have served in the US military and those who are eligible for veterans priority of service.

Using Connecting Colorado, users can register in order to receive automatic job matching from the statewide database. They also offer assistance in developing and customizing resumes and cover letters, job search guidance, information on licensure, certification, apprenticeship and training programs, information on rights and priority for veterans, direct referrals for job openings, customized job development, and job fairs and hiring events.

Their Veterans Employment Specialists serve fellow veterans by providing expertise in job and training opportunities. They have a partnership with local Workforce Centers that will allow any veteran who has served at least one day of active duty to receive that additional support with their job search. Eligible spouses are also included.

The Colorado Workforce Center Services also provide workshops, on-the-job training, information on wage rates and employment trends, vocational guidance and career counseling, referrals to services within the community, and access to phone, internet, printer, fax and copy machines.

You can find their two main locations in Denver and Lakewood, the department also deploys many nationally trained County Veteran Service Officers throughout the state.

Veterans Preference in Selection

The US Congress and the Colorado Constitution have authorized the awarding of preference to certain veterans.

Candidates that do meet the criteria for veterans’ preference are only referred if their final passing score, plus any applicable veterans’ preference points, places them as one of the six highest ranking applicants that are eligible for referral.

The preference points are added after the final examination has been scored, but before the referral is given.

Five-point preference is given to those who honorably separated, who served on active duty, excluding active duty for training, in the Armed Forces during any war declared by congress. It is also given to the spouse of a veteran who is unable to work because of a service related disability, and the widow or widower of a deceased veteran who would have been entitled to veterans’ preference.

Ten-point preference is given to those who were honorably separated and qualify as a disabled veteran because they served on active duty in the Armed Forces at any time and have a present service-connected disability or are receiving compensation, disability retirement benefits, or a pension from the military or the Veterans Administration.

Preference in Layoff

If there is a layoff because of lack of work or lack of funds in the state workforce, employees that were eligible for veterans’ preference are awarded service credit on a year-for-year basis for up to ten years of military service. Veterans who have 20 or more years of military service are not eligible to receive any 4 credit for this service for retention purposes. Those who do have veterans’ preference shall not be separated from employment before individuals not eligible for veterans’ preference with the same amount of total service.

Colorado State Income Tax Exemption

If you are between the ages of 55-64 you may deduct up to $20,000 of retirement benefits from your federal taxable income. If you are over 65, you can deduct up to $24,000. Any age can deduct a percentage of military retirement benefits from his or her state income tax. In 2018, the percentage is equal to 10% and it increases by 10% each year thereafter until all military retirement benefits are exempt.

For more information regarding Alabama veterans benefits, please visit Colorado Division of Veterans Affairs

 

RELATED:

 

 

Arkansas Veterans Benefits & Disabled Veterans Benefits

The following are the Arkansas veterans’ benefits programs for 2018 and 2019.  These programs include education, employment, health care and housing.

Arkansas Veterans’ Benefits

Education Benefits

In addition to federal programs such as the GI Bill, there are education benefits programs provided by the state of Arkansas to veterans.

Free Tuition for Dependents

The Arkansas Department of Higher Education may provide free tuition and fees at any state supported college, university, technical school, or vocational school; to the wife and children of any Arkansan who has been declared to be POW or MIA since January 1, 1960. The same provisions apply to the surviving spouse and children of any Arkansas resident killed in action since 1960.

Find colleges in Arkansas with our School Finder.  Use the filters to sort schools by state.

Arkansas National Guard Tuition Assistance Program (NGTA)

Free college tuition for all Guardsmen for tuition only up to 120 credit hours.

RELATED: Tuition Assistance and National Guard Tuition Assistance

Housing Benefits For Veterans In Arkansas

Homestead and Personal Property Tax Exemption

Any disabled veteran in Arkansas who has been awarded special monthly compensation by the Department of Veterans Affairs will be exempt from having to pay state taxes on their homestead or personal property as long as they own it. This is for veterans who have lost their limbs or the use of one or more limbs, have total blindness in one or both eyes, or for those who have service-connected total and permanent disability at the rate of 100%.

For surviving spouses, as long as they do remain unmarried, they and their minor dependent children will be able to continue this entitlement. If the veteran was killed or died during military duties, is missing in action, or died from service connected causes as certified by the Department of Veterans Affairs, they can also receive these benefits. If a subsequent marriage is terminated, the surviving spouse can be reinstated.

If you receive this benefit, you will need to have annual re-certification of continued entitlement by the VA.

Health Care Benefits For Veterans In Arkansas

Arkansas State Veterans Home at Fayetteville

This veterans home welcomed their first resident in 2006 and they are a licensed Medicaid/Medicare 108 bed skilled care nursing facility that provides a comfortable and supportive atmosphere for veterans. They operate under the direction of the Arkansas Department of Veterans Affairs and have been approved and recognized by the Federal Veterans Administration as a qualified state veterans home.

The home is for those who are honorably discharged, are a veteran, a veteran spouse, or a gold star parent, and have a medical need for nursing home placement. Priority is also given to Arkansas residents.

Arkansas State Veterans Home at North Little Rock

Ground broke on this veterans home in 2015. This home has the sole purpose of long-term care for veterans. They have a small home design where there are eight individual houses that serve 12 resistances each. Each resident will have their own private bedroom and bathroom. In order to apply you would need to have an honorable discharge, have a medical need for a nursing home placement, and be a veteran, a veteran spouse, or a gold star parent. Arkansas residents do have first priority.

Employment Benefits For Veterans In Arkansas

Arkansas Military Retirement Pay is Exempt from State Taxes

Military retirement pay is exempt from Arkansas state income taxes. This is effective as of January 1, 2018.

Gross Receipt of Tax Exemption

If a veteran is blind as a result of a service-connected injury, any gross receipts or proceeds derived from the sale of a new automobile will receive a tax exemption. Registration requires you to have an entitlement letter from the VA and you would be limited to one new vehicle every two years. For this exemption, an automobile is a passenger vehicle or pickup truck but does not include trucks with a maximum gross load in excess of ¾ ton and cannot include a trailer.

The Arkansas Department of Workforce Services

 This program provides employment counseling and referral services that are tailored to the special needs of veterans. They also have an ongoing program of job development that is designed to create jobs and preferences for all veterans through the Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVER) and the Disabled Veterans Outreach program (DVOP.)

For more information regarding Alabama veterans benefits, please visit – Arkansas Department of Veterans Affairs

Related state military and veteran information:

 

 

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