Veteran Careers with the U.S. Marshals Service

U.S. Marshals Careers for Veterans

The U.S. Marshals Service has served the nation since 1789, making the USMS the oldest federal law enforcement agency in the U.S. Much of their work goes unseen by the general public.  The U.S. Marshals Service (USMS) is the enforcement arm of the federal court system. Deputies participate in nearly every federal law enforcement activity. U.S. Marshals have jurisdiction in 94 federal judicial districts.

Special Hiring Rules for Veterans

Many of the educational and experience requirements may be waived for military veteran candidates. In addition, as a veteran, you are given priority for many federal jobs, especially in the case of federal law enforcement given that your training, experience and learned skills translate well into the law enforcement field.

If you are eligible, you can also apply for Veterans’ Preference Points. To learn more about Veterans’ Preference, click here.

U.S. Marshal Service Career Paths

Like many of the federal law enforcement agencies you have several career paths to choose from, from direct law enforcement roles to behind scenes careers in logistics and administration. The U.S. Marshal Service offers three main paths: Deputy Marshals, Detention and Aviation Enforcement, and Administration. For the sake of this article we will focus on the U.S. Marshal career opportunities.

Deputy U.S. Marshal Duties

Deputy Marshals serve in several specialized roles including Judicial Security, Prisoner Services, Special Missions and Programs. Asset Forfeiture, and Witness Security (WitSec).

Judicial Security – Protecting federal judicial officials (judges, attorneys and jurors) is a foundational mission for the U.S. Marshals.

Transporting Prisoners/JPATS – Marshals and the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement operate the Justice Prisoner and Alien Transportation System (JPATS).

Fugitive Operations – Marshals are the government’s primary team for pursuing fugitive. In 2014, the U.S. Marshals arrested more than 33,500 federal fugitive felons, clearing 36,700 felony warrants – more than all other law enforcement agencies combined.

Foreign Fugitives – The U.S. Marshals is the premier agency for capturing foreign fugitives believed to be in the United States, and it is the agency responsible for locating and extraditing American fugitives, who flee to foreign countries. In 2014, the U.S. Marshals Service coordinated 883 extraditions/deportations.

The USMS also works with the Department of State’s Diplomatic Security Service and hold key positions at Interpol.

Prisoner Operations – The USMS detains prisoners in federal, state, local and private jails throughout the nation.

Special Operations Group  – The USMS  Special Operations Group is a specially trained, tactical unit made up of Deputy Marshals, who can respond immediately to incidents anywhere in the United States or its common wealths and territories.

Asset Forfeiture – The U.S. Marshals Service is responsible for managing and disposing of seized properties acquired by criminals through illegal activities. Marshals currently manages and disposes of nearly $2.2 billion in property.

Witness Security (WitSec) – The U.S. Marshals ensure the safety of witnesses, who are at risk for testifying for the government in cases involving organized crime and other significant criminal activities. The Marshals have protected, relocated and given new identities to more than 8,500 witnesses and more than 9,900 of their family members, since 1971.

Visit the U.S. Marshals Service website for specific eligibility and  fitness requirements.

Deputy U.S. Marshal Hiring Programs

Hiring Opportunities – If you would like to pursue a career with the USMS, please visit USAJOBS.

Applications for Deputy U.S. Marshal Positions are ONLY accepted through the USAJOBS site during posted announcement open periods.

If you have career or employment questions, please call (703) 740-4001 or send an email to: usms.recruitment@usdoj.gov.

All applications must be submitted through USAJOBS

 

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Operation Warfighter – Homeland Security Internship

Operation Warfighter (OWF)

Operation Warfighter (OWF) is a short-term internship program developed by the Department of Defense for service members that are recuperating at military treatment facilities throughout the United States.

Like the FBI’s Wounded Warrior Internship, Operation Warfighter provides recovering service members a transition assistance program outside of the hospital.

Operation Warfighter is an opportunity for those on medical hold to build out their resumes, explore career interests, develop job skills, and get invaluable government work experience that can help them adjust to the civilian workforce.

To be eligible you must be on active duty in the military (including the National Guard and Reserves) and be a U.S. citizen. In addition, you must also fulfill the appropriate security clearance requirements.

How Operation Warfighter Works

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) career opportunities include administration, security, operations, and human resources. If you are accepted, you will be assigned a supervisor, and a mentor based on your skills, expertise, and interests.

Your mentor will assist you with the in-processing process and throughout your assignment. Your mentor’s job is to help you integrate into your specific department, provide guidance on how to perform your specific work duties, and answer your questions.

OWF Duty Schedules and Assignment Length

Duty schedules for Operation Warfighter interns are based on your medical treatment schedule. You will work half-time (about 20 hours per week), depending on your availability. The DoD will provide transportation to and from your temporary assignment site.

The average length of an assignment is 3-5 months. You may be given training to enhance your existing skills and/or learn new skills. The length of your assignment is also determined by your medical status.

Operation Warfighter Salary

Since the service members are still receiving their military salaries, they are not compensated by the Department and there is no cost to the Department for bringing a Warfighter onboard.

Future Employment Opportunities with DHS

Service members released from medical hold are considered potential candidates for full-time employment with DHS. However, there is no guarantee of full-time employment.

Applying for the Operation Warfighter Program

To apply for an internship through the Operation Warfighter Initiative, please submit your resume and a brief description of the type of temporary assignment you are seeking to owf@hq.dhs.gov.

If you have any questions about the Operation Warfighter Initiative, please contact the DoD’s OWF Program Manager at 202-357-1268 or by email at warriorcare@osd.mil.

 

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Wounded Warriors Internship Opportunities with the FBI

Source: The following content was provided by the Federal Bureau of Investigation

The FBI’s Wounded Warriors Internship Program enables the FBI to support veterans during their medical recovery, and provide career development opportunities for active duty service members recovering from a medical procedure.

The FBI’s Wounded Warrior Internship Program

The Wounded Warrior Internship Program offers wounded warriors a path for transitioning back to the military or civilian workforce through rewarding assignments and career-driven experiences.

The program gives wounded warriors the opportunity to:

  • Build or update their resume
  • Explore career paths and employment interests
  • Develop valuable job skills
  • Gain federal government work experience prior to their transition back into the civilian workforce

The WWIP is like a working interview and a chance to evaluate candidates for possible permanent positions with the FBI. Internship opportunities are available at both FBI headquarters and field offices.

The Wounded Warriors Internship Program is available throughout the FBI. To qualify you must:

  • Be an active-duty service member recovering from a medical procedure and be authorized by the Department of Defense (DoD) to participate in the Wounded Warrior Internship Program.
  • Be a U.S. Citizen, have been favorably adjudicated in a single-scope Top Secret background investigation, or have the ability to secure such adjudication.

All Wounded Warriors are expected to meet the FBI’s basic requirements. If any of theses factors apply to you, you are not eligible:

  • Conviction of a felony (Special Agent candidates only: conviction of a domestic violence misdemeanor or more serious offense)
  • Violation of the FBI Employment Drug Policy (please see below for additional details).
  • Default on a student loan insured by the U.S. Government
  • Failure of an FBI-administered urinalysis drug test.
  • Failure to register with the Selective Service System (for males only, exceptions apply – please click here to find out more).
  • Knowingly or willfully engaged in acts or activities designed to overthrow the U.S. government by force.
  • Failure to pay court ordered child support.
  • Failure to file federal, state, or local income tax returns.

Please note that if you are disqualified by any of the above tests, you are not eligible for employment with the FBI. Please make sure you can meet FBI employment requirements and pass all disqualifiers before you apply for an FBI position.

Participants in the Wounded Warriors Internship program may also be eligible for full-time employment after the internship. Applicants are considered based on their skills, abilities, and needs of the FBI.

To apply, please contact your regional Operation War Fighter Coordinator.

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Veteran Job Opportunities with the U.S. Secret Service

Veteran’s Guide to Joining the U.S. Secret Service

The Secret Service is committed to employing Veterans like you because the agency’s five core values: justice, duty, courage, honesty, and loyalty align perfectly with the core values shared by every branch of the U.S. Armed Forces.

The Secret Service knows that leadership is instilled in Veterans, like you, as well as loyalty, dependability, enthusiasm, initiative, integrity, and judgment. These are the exact characteristics the Secret Service looks for in a qualified candidate.

As a Veteran you also have a leg up on the competition due to the Veterans Employment Opportunity Act (VEOA). To be eligible for a VEOA appointment, you must be honorably separated and either 1).  preference point eligible or 2). have substantially completed three or more years of active service. For additional information visit www.fedshirevets.gov. Veterans with specific questions regarding Secret Service employment opportunities, may email the U.S. Secret Service directly.

Secret Service Careers

Like all federal agencies, the Secret Service has both operational law enforcement and administrative career opportunities. The U.S. Secret Service breaks these careers down to three types: Special Agents, the Uniformed Division (Officers), and the Administration, Professional, and Technical (APT).

Secret Service Special Agents

The job of special agent offers you a challenging and fulfilling career in one of their two integrated missions – investigation and protection. While the executive protection mission is known worldwide, the U.S. Secret Service’s investigative mission continues to grow due to developments in technology.

The Investigative Mission: Today the agency’s investigative mission has evolved from enforcing counterfeiting laws to safeguarding the payment and financial systems of the United States from a wide range of financial and computer-based crimes. In the field of protection Secret Service special agents develop and implement innovative strategies to mitigate threats to our nation’s leaders.

The U.S. Secret Service has a pivotal role in securing the nation’s critical infrastructures, specifically in the areas of cyber, banking and finance. In response to the globalization of technology- based threats, the U.S. Secret Service’s investigative mission abroad is growing as well, creating the need for a heightened overseas liaison presence.

The Protective Mission: The Secret Service is recognized for the physical protection it provides to the nation’s highest elected leaders, visiting foreign dignitaries, facilities and major events. In order to ensure a secure environment for protectees, the Secret Service integrates a variety of innovative technologies and maintains a highly skilled and motivated workforce. Much of the Protective Service mission engages both Special Agents and Uniformed Officers.

A typical special agent career path, depending upon performance and promotions that affect individual assignments, begins with the first six to eight years on the job assigned to a field office. Newly-appointed agents may be assigned to field offices anywhere in the United States. After their field experience, agents are usually transferred to a protective assignment where they will stay for three to five years.

The special agent position starts at a salary of $49,016 (GL-7, step 1), with promotion potential to $144,676 (GS-13, step 10).

Special Agent Entry Level Education Requirements:

  • A bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with superior academic achievement (based on class standing, grade-point average, or honor society membership).   For more information please click here.
    OR
  • At least one full year of graduate level education (i.e. 18 semester hours).
    OR
  • At least one year of specialized experience equivalent to the GL-5 level.

Secret Service Special Agent Recruit Eligibility/Qualifications

To be considered for Special Agent positions you must:

  • Be a U.S. Citizen
  • Be at least 21 years of age at time of application and younger than 37 at the time of receipt of a conditional offer of employment to continue in the application process. Applicants with veterans’ preference must be at least 21 years of age and younger than 40 at the time of receipt of a conditional offer of employment to continue in the application process.
  • Possess a current valid driver’s license.
  • Qualify for the GL-07 level or the GL-09 level
  • Have uncorrected vision no worse than 20/100 binocular; correctable to 20/20.
  • Be in excellent health and physical condition
  • Pass a written examination
  • Pass an Applicant Physical Abilities Test
  • Qualify for a Top Secret clearance and undergo a complete background investigation, to include in-depth interviews, drug screening, medical and polygraph examinations
  • Certify that you have registered with the Selective Service System or are exempt from having to do so, if you are a male applicant born after December 31, 1959
  • The Secret Service prohibits employees from having visible body markings (including but not limited to tattoos, body art, and branding) on the head, face, neck, hand and fingers (any area below the wrist bone).

Special Agent Pay and Benefits

In addition to federal employee benefits, special agent benefits also include:

  • Law Enforcement Availability Pay (LEAP) that provides an opportunity for special agents to receive up to an additional 25 percent of their annual base pay
  • Low-cost life insurance
  • Individual or family membership in low-cost federal health benefit plans
  • Annual leave earned at the rate of 13 to 26 days per year, based on length of employment (prior federal civilian or military service is credited, as authorized)
  • Sick leave accumulated at the rate of 13 days per year without limit
  • Paid holidays
  • Comprehensive retirement benefits (retirement credit is granted for prior federal military or government service, as authorized)
  • Eligibility for participation in Flexible Spending Account Program (a tax-favored program offered to employees to pay for eligible out-of-pocket health care and dependent care expenses with pre-tax dollars)

Uniformed Division (Officers)

The Uniformed Division’s mission is to protect facilities and venues secured for U.S. Secret Service protectees. Throughout its history, the Uniformed Division has accomplished this mission through a tradition of honor, integrity, and a commitment to excellence. The Officer position starts at a salary of $63,970 in the Office of Protective Operations, Uniformed Division.

Secret Service Uniformed Division officers may be selected to participate in one of several specialized units, including the:

  • Canine Unit: Performing security sweeps and responding to bomb threats and suspicious packages.
  • Emergency Response Team: Providing a coordinated tactical response for the White House and other protected facilities.
  • Countersniper Team: Utilizing observation, sighting equipment and high-performance weapons to provide a secure environment for protectees.
  • Motorcade Support Unit: Providing motorcycle tactical support for official movements of motorcades.
  • Crime Scene Search Unit: Photographing, collecting and processing physical and latent evidence.
  • Office of Training: Serving as firearms and classroom instructors or recruiters.
  • Special Operations Section: Handling special duties and functions at the White House Complex, including conducting the daily congressional and public tours of the White House.

Uniformed Division Officer Eligibility

To be considered for Uniformed Division officer positions you must:

  • Be a U.S. Citizen
  • Be at least 20 years of age at time of application and younger than 37 at the time of receipt of a conditional offer of employment to continue in the application process. Applicants with veterans’ preference must be at least 20 years of age at time of application and younger than 40 at the time of receipt of a conditional offer of employment to continue in the application process.
  • Have uncorrected vision no worse than 20/100 binocular; correctable to 20/20 in each eye (NOTE: Lasik, ALK, RK and PRK corrective eye surgeries are acceptable eyes surgeries for applicants provided specific visual tests are passed. The following are the waiting periods before visual tests are conducted after the surgery: Lasik surgery–three months; PRK–six months; and ALK and RK–one year.) Applicants must meet the vision requirement at the time of application.
  • Be in excellent health and physical condition.
  • Complete an Applicant Physical Abilities Test.
  • Complete interviews and pass a written test.
  • Qualify for a Top Secret clearance and undergo a complete background investigation, to include driving record check, drug screening, medical and polygraph examinations
  • Certify that you have registered with the Selective Service System or are exempt from having to do so, if you are a male applicant born after December 31, 1959
  • The Secret Service prohibits employees from having visible body markings (including but not limited to tattoos, body art, and branding) on the head, face, neck, hand and fingers (any area below the wrist bone).

Uniformed Division Officer Benefits

In addition to federal employee benefits, Uniformed Division officer benefits also include:

  • Competitive starting salary
  • Overtime compensation at the rate of time and one-half, or through compensatory time off
  • Uniforms and equipment furnished at no cost
  • Low-cost life insurance
  • Individual or family membership in low-cost federal health benefit plans
  • Annual leave earned at the rate of 13 to 26 days per year, based on length of employment (prior federal civilian or military service is credited, as authorized)
  • Sick leave accumulated at the rate of 13 days per year without limit
  • Paid holidays
  • Reasonable moving expenses paid for out-of-area hires
  • Comprehensive retirement benefits (retirement credit is granted for prior federal military or government service, as authorized)
  • Eligibility for participation in Flexible Spending Account Program (a tax-favored program offered to employees to pay for eligible out-of-pocket health care and dependent care expenses with pre-tax dollars)

For more information on the Secret Service Uniformed Division click here.

Administrative, Professional and Technical (APT)

If dedicated., mission driven and committed to excellence describe you, you should take a closer look at the APT job opportunities being offered at the United States Secret Service. The agency is seeking talented, diverse individuals from all segments of the American society to serve in the Secret Service. APT employees play a critical role in ensuring the overall success of our protective and investigative missions.

Here is a sampling of the APT jobs:

Administration, Professional, and Technical Eligibility

To be considered for administrative, professional and technical positions you must:

  • Be a U.S. Citizen
  • Pass a drug test (urinalysis)
  • Certify you have registered with the Selective Service System if you are a male applicant born after December 31, 1959, or certify you are exempt from having to do so under Selective Service law
  • Qualify for a Top Secret clearance and undergo a complete background investigation. Some positions require successful completion of a polygraph and/or medical examination.
  • The Secret Service prohibits employees from having visible body markings (including but not limited to tattoos, body art, and branding) on the head, face, neck, hand and fingers (any area below the wrist bone). If you have visible body markings, you will be required to medically remove such visible body markings at your own expense prior to entering on duty with the Secret Service.

Administration, Professional, and Technical Benefits

In addition to federal employee benefits, administrative, professional and technical position benefits also include:

  • Competitive starting salary
  • Low-cost life insurance
  • Individual or family membership in low-cost federal health benefit plans
  • Annual leave earned at the rate of 13 to 26 days per year, based on length of employment (prior federal civilian or military service is credited, as authorized)
  • Sick leave accumulated at the rate of 13 days per year without limit
  • Paid holidays
  • Comprehensive retirement benefits (retirement credit is granted for prior federal military or government service, as authorized)
  • Eligibility for participation in Flexible Spending Account Program (a tax-favored program offered to employees to pay for eligible out-of-pocket health care and dependent care expenses with pre-tax dollars)

Join the U.S. Secret Service

If you think you think you have the sense of justice, duty, courage, honesty, and loyalty it takes to join the U.S. Secret Service, then you should visit the Secret Service website to start the application process and check out the current openings for Special Agents Uniformed Officers, and Administrative, Professional and Technical positions.

 

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FBI Law Enforcement Careers for Veterans

Careers for Veterans at the FBI in Law Enforcement

Like all Federal Agencies, the FBI values your military service and offers many opportunities for you to continue to serve the nation. But, unlike some federal agencies, the FBI actively recruits military and veteran candidates like you to apply for any of the positions that may interest you.

FBI Special Veterans Hiring Programs

If you are eligible, you can apply for Veterans’ Preference Points. To learn more about Veterans’ Preference, click here. The FBI also has a specific program for Wounded Warriors, also known as Operation War Fighter. Click here for more information about the FBI’s Wounded Warrior Internship program.

More information on benefits for veterans and servicemen and women is available on the FBI’s Benefits page, as well as on FedsHireVets.gov.

College Recon help you find the college or university that offers the degrees need to be successful in Law Enforcement. Click here to learn more.

FBI Career Paths for Veterans

As a veteran you may apply for any of the jobs at the FBI, from Special Agent to any of the professional positions, like forensics, accounting, information technology/cybersecurity, surveillance, intelligence analysis, and more. There are two main career paths within the FBI. The best known is Operations & Intelligence, which is most often seen in movies and TV shows.

FBI Operations and Intelligence

The FBI career opportunities in Operations and Intelligence include Special Agents, Intelligence Analysts, Forensic Accountants, and Surveillance Specialists.

Special Agents

The mission of the FBI is to protect and uphold the Constitution of the United States. Special Agents are responsible for enforcing more than 300 federal statutes, in addition to investigating criminal activities.

FBI Special Agents possess a broad range of education, experiences and skills. Special Agents often come from a unexpected professional backgrounds outside of law enforcement, including education, science, business and technology.

Intelligence Analysts

FBI Analysts scrutinize data and intel, make judgments and recommendations to help determine if action is needed to mitigate all threats. Having the right information and guidance is critical to protecting the United States. Intelligence Analysts’ recommendations and strategies help identify and combat threats, while working with state, local and federal partners and other members of the Intelligence Community to help diminish risks before they happen.

Forensic Accountant

Forensic Accountants tackle complicated challenges with every assignment. They work with Special Agents to keep our country safe by tracking and linking funding sources to criminal activity.

Surveillance Specialist

Surveillance Specialists keep the nation safe and take on both domestic and international threats, the FBI relies on a constant stream of intelligence gathered by a team of surveillance professionals.

Professionals doing surveillance work alongside case agents to discreetly gather intelligence in support of ongoing counterterrorism, foreign counterintelligence and criminal investigations.

FBI Opportunities in Specialized Careers

The second career path focus is on Specialized Careers that directly support the FBI’s efforts to protect the American people and the Constitution. Professional career path is less known, but these professional teams are also an important part of keeping our communities and our nation safe. FBI Professional teams include, Business Administration, Accounting and Finance, Facilities and Logistics, Legal, and Federal Security/Policing. For the sake of this article we will focus on the law enforcement related specialties.

Federal Security and Policing

Security personnel play a huge role in the FBI’s mission. There are several opportunities for security professionals including Physical Security Specialist, FBI Police Officers, Industrial Security Specialists, Personnel Security Specialists, which described below.

  • Physical Security Specialist is one of the first lines of defense against domestic and international threats. They are most often responsible for facility security and managing guest check in and staff access.
  • FBI Police Officers keep the FBI and surrounding areas secure. If you are selected for the FBI police force you will be required to complete the FBI’s 12-week, Uniformed Police Officer Training Program at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) in Glynco, GA. Cadets will then get an additional four weeks of specialized instruction at the FBI Academy and five weeks of on-the-job training at their new permanent duty station.  For more information about the FBI Police Officer position, please download the Police Officer Selection System Candidate Information Packet.
  • Security Specialists provide direct support and service to the administration of the FBI Personnel Security Program by conducting complex security assessment investigations and rendering appropriate adjudications.
  • Industrial Security Specialists safeguard FBI operations through the proactive identification, assessment, and mitigation of risks associated with the procurement of critical assets and classified contracts.
  • Personnel Security Specialists are responsible for managing background investigations of FBI employment candidates and employees. They give direct assistance to the background investigation procedures.

Entry-level applicants should apply to this position via the FBI’s Collegiate Hiring Initiative.

Eligibility for Joining the FBI

All FBI applicants must meet the FBI’s Employment Eligibility requirements. Below are specific non-starters that will get you instantly disqualified. These include:

  • Non-U.S. citizenship
  • Conviction of a felony (Special Agent candidates only: conviction of a domestic violence misdemeanor or more serious offense)
  • Violation of the FBI Employment Drug Policy (please see below for additional details)
  • Default on a student loan insured by the U.S. Government
  • Failure of an FBI-administered urinalysis drug test
  • Failure to register with the Selective Service System (for males only, exceptions apply – please click here to find out more)
  • Knowingly or willfully engaged in acts or activities designed to overthrow the U.S. government by force
  • Failure to pay court ordered child support
  • Failure to file federal, state, or local income tax returns

If you are disqualified by any of the above criteria, you are not able to serve in the FBI at any level. Be sure you can meet FBI employment requirements and pass all disqualifiers before you apply.

 

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Law Enforcement Careers Can Start as a Correctional Officer

From Correctional Officer to a Law Enforcement Career

Many Veterans seek jobs in Law Enforcement after the military, but few consider looking into careers as correctional officers (prison guard). However, it may actually make good sense for you to consider working as a correctional officer to prepare you for a career in police work. In fact, working for the Federal Bureau of Prisons may be a great opportunity to start your career as a Federal Law Enforcement officer.

Many police officers have found that working in the prison system as a correctional officer helped them sharpen their situational awareness and intuition because constant danger from working with convicted criminals. This kind of situational awareness is essential for officer safety both in the prisons and on the streets. It can also prepare you for opportunities in personal protect.

Also known as BOP, the prison bureau operates more than 200  prisons, satellite prison camps, and private prisons. In total, the federal prison system houses more than 180,000 inmates.

Veterans Hiring Programs at the Federal Bureau of Prisons

If you are eligible, you can apply for Veterans’ Preference Points to help land a job in federal law enforcement. To learn more about Veterans’ Preference, click here.  You can apply for a position and be hired, even if you still have military service left. Please call 972-352-4200 or email the staffing section to learn more about exciting employment opportunities with the Bureau of Prison.

The official website and one-stop resource for Federal veteran employment information is: http://www.fedshirevets.gov

Federal Bureau of Prisons Career Path Opportunities

There are four main career areas within the Federal Bureau of Prisons – Inmate Custody & Programs, Health Services, Careers in Operational, Careers in Support & Administration. This means that as a veteran you can choose from several career paths, including several that do not deal directly with inmates. See details on these career paths below.

Federal Correctional Officer Careers

Correctional Officers are the largest part of the Bureau of Prisons workforce. All BOP institutions routinely have vacancies for this position. Correctional Officers enforce the regulations governing the operation of a correctional institution, serving as both a supervisor and counselor of inmates.

BOP Corrections Officers can qualify for different levels (or ranks). The basic requirements to apply for a position as a Corrections Officer include Oral Communication Skills, Interpersonal Skills, Writing Skills, Organizational Awareness, Human Resources Management Skills, and Stress Tolerance.

Age Requirements – At time of appointment, applicants must not have reached their 37th birthday unless they previously served in a Federal civilian law enforcement position covered by special civil service retirement provisions, including early or mandatory retirement. Qualified Preference Eligible Veterans may be exempt from meeting the maximum entry age of 37.

 

>> College Recon help you find the college or university that offers the degrees need to be successful in Law Enforcement. Click Here to learn more.

The BOP is hiring Corrections Officers for many locations across the country.

Normally when a vacancy is announced, it’s for a job opening at a specific location. However, because this position is in high demand it’s considered an “open-continuous” announcement. That means you get to choose your top two facilities where you would like to work. Here’s how it works:

  • Apply for this position using the usajobs.gov website as you would do with any other federal job.
    Correctional Officer Open-Continuous Announcement
  • Select any two locations where you would like to work.
    View all of our locations
  • After your application is accepted, you will be added to a standing register of qualified candidates.
  • When a position becomes available at one of the facilities that you selected, you will be considered for that position, and if you are selected we will contact you with an offer.

Other Careers at the Federal Bureau of Prisons

Careers in Inmate Custody & Programs – This career path tends to include direct contact with inmates, to include Corrections Officers, Case Managers, Chaplains, and Clinical Psychologists to name a few. The position that deals the most directly with the inmates is, of course, the Corrections Officers.

Careers in Health Services – The Health Services Division is responsible for medical, dental, and mental health (psychiatric) services provided to Federal inmates in Bureau facilities, including health care delivery, infectious disease management, and medical designations.

Careers in Operational Readiness – The Operational Readiness division focuses on facilities and equipment maintenance and repair. These jobs include; Automotive Mechanics, Carpenters, Electricians, Fabric Workers, Food Service Supervisors, HVAC Mechanics, Painters, Plumbers, and more.

Careers in Support & Administration – Support and Administration directly support the BOP. This career path is an important part of keeping the Federal prison system running smoothly. This division employs specialists in Business Administration, Accounting and Finance, Facilities and Logistics, Legal, and Federal Security/Policing.

Visit the Federal Bureau of Prisons to lean more about the eligibility and physical requirements.

 

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Congress to Stop Coronavirus from Impacting GI Bill BAH Payments

Congress Has Announced Plans to Stop Coronavirus’ Impact on GI Bill Rates

Update 03/21/2020: The legislation to protect veterans from the impact of campus closures has been signed by President Trump, thus safeguarding GI Bill benefits (Housing Stipend) from being reduced for veterans who were forced to take classes online due to the coronavirus.

House and Senate lawmakers have introduced bills that could stop the impact of the coronavirus on GI Bill rates (Housing Stipends) for student veterans whose colleges and universities are forced to switch to online classes in response to the coronavirus (COVID-19).

Reaction to Shifting to Online Classes

Congress is reacting to the recent news that many institutions have announced the shift to online classes following the cancellation of classroom based courses for the remainder of the spring semester.

“No student veteran, dependent, or spouse should be worried about their GI Bill benefits being reduced or cut off because of actions their school is taking in response to COVID-19,” said Rep. Phil Roe, R-Tenn. Rep. Roe’s bill, introduced as H.R.6194, is currently being debated in the House Veteran’s Affairs Committee.

The GI Bill Housing Stipend is determined by several factors, the biggest of which is whether the classes are on-campus or online. The current rate for online classes is set at $894.50, which is half of the national average housing rate paid to classroom based students.

Bills Would Protect Students’ Housing Allowances When Forced to Switch

The Senate and House bills would likely protect students who are forced to switch to online courses, but they are not likely to provide that protection for students who elect to switch to online-only classes.

Stay tuned, we will update Congress’ efforts to avoid the Coronavirus’ impact on GI Bill.

 

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Guide to Veterans’ Preference Points – What is Veterans Preference Points?

Considering going to work for the Federal Government after you leave the military?  Then knowing how Veterans’ preference points work is a must. The following guide will help you take advantage of this hiring preference program for veterans.

Veterans’ Preference Points Fast FAQs

Fast FAQ #1: What do Veterans’ preference points do?

Veterans’ preference points can help you land a government job by making you more competitive when competing head-to-head with a more or equally qualified civilian candidate.

Fast FAQ #2: Do Veterans preference points work for all government jobs?

No, not all government jobs use a competitive point system for hiring. You will be notified if preference points are used when you apply for a federal position.

Fast FAQ #3: Do state and local governments use the federal Veterans’ preference points system?

No, however, many states, counties, and cities do have their own ways of giving Veterans preference.

Fast FAQ #4: How many points would I get?

The answer really depends on where you land within the 3 levels or types of preference: The three types of Veterans preference are:

0 Point Preference: You would get a 0-point preference if you were released or discharged from active duty after August 29, 2008, because you were the only surviving child in a family in which a parent or a sibling(s) either served in the armed forces, and was killed, or is permanently 100 percent disabled or hospitalized on a continuing basis. (See more details below)

5 Point Preference: You are eligible for a 5-point preference if your time on active duty was more than 180 consecutive days during a time of conflict (specific service dates and criteria are listed below).

10 Point Preference: You are eligible for a 10-point preference if you served at any time, and you have a service-connected disability, or received a Purple Heart.

Fast FAQ #5: If I am eligible for 0-point preference does it mean that I don’t get Veterans’ preference?

No, it simply means that no points are added to your passing score, but you are entitled to be listed ahead of other non-preference candidates with the same score on an examination.

Fast FAQ #6: How do I apply for Veterans preference points?

You will be required to provide the following acceptable documentation to apply for Veterans preference:

  • Copy of your DD-214, “Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty,” which shows dates of service and discharge under honorable conditions. OR
  • “Certification” from the armed forces that certifies you are expected to be discharged or released from active duty service in the armed forces under honorable conditions not later than 120 days after the date the certification is signed; OR
  • Standard Form (SF-15 (PDF file)), Application for 10-point Veterans’ Preference. If you are claiming 10 point preference, you will need to submit an (SF-15 (PDF file)).

You may obtain a letter from the Department of Veterans Affairs reflecting your level of disability for preference eligibility by visiting a VA Regional Office, contacting a VA call center or online.

Fast FAQ #7: How do the preference points apply to my hiring?

In federal jobs called “competitive service” jobs, agencies use a numerical rating and ranking system to determine the best qualified applicants for a position. As a Veteran you may have an additional 5 or 10 points are added to your numerical score. However, their several other types of Federal Government jobs. Details on all the ways Veterans preference is applied will be addressed below.

Veterans Preference Points in Detail

Veterans preference points apply when agencies use a numerical rating and ranking system to determine the best qualified applicants for a position.  An additional 5 or 10 points are added to the numerical score of qualified preference eligible veterans.

Veterans preference points are designed to ensure that if you apply for a federal job and you served on active duty during certain specified time periods or in military campaigns, you are entitled to preference over non-veterans both in hiring from competitive lists and in retention during reductions in force.

In addition, the VOW Act (Veterans Opportunity to Work to Hire Heroes Act of 2011), ensures that as a veteran you have an opportunity for Veterans’ preference even before you leave the military.

If you apply before your ETS you can receive consideration as a preference eligible veteran, if you can provide a certification that you are expected to be discharged or released from active duty under honorable conditions no later than 120 days from the date of the certification; the circumstances of the discharge are verified at the time of actual appointment.

Keep in mind that Veterans preference only applies to veterans that were discharged or released from active duty in the armed forces under honorable conditions. This means you must have been discharged under an honorable or general discharge.

If you are a “retired member of the armed forces” you are not included in the definition of preference eligible unless you are a disabled veteran OR you retired below the rank of major or its equivalent.

Types of Preference Eligibility in Detail

There are basically three types of preference eligibility, sole survivorship (0-point preference eligible), non-disabled (5-point preference eligible) and disabled (10-point preference eligible).

0 Point Preference:

You are eligible for a 0-point preference if you were released or discharged from a period of active duty from the armed forces, after August 29, 2008, by reason of being the only surviving child in a family in which the father or mother or one or more siblings:

  1. Served in the armed forces, and
  2. Was killed, died as a result of wounds, accident, or disease, is in a captured or missing in action status, or is permanently 100 percent disabled or hospitalized on a continuing basis (and is not employed gainfully because of the disability or hospitalization), where
  3. The death, status, or disability did not result from the intentional misconduct or willful neglect of the parent or sibling and was not incurred during a period of unauthorized absence.

Note: No points are added to the passing score or rating of 0-point preference eligible, but you are entitled to be listed ahead of non-preference eligible with the same score on an examination, or in the same quality category.

5 Point Preference:

You are eligible for a 5-point preference if your active duty service meets any of the following:

  1. For more than 180 consecutive days, other than for training, any part of which occurred during the period beginning September 11, 2001, and ending on August 31, 2010, the last day of Operation Iraqi Freedom, OR
  2. During the Gulf War, between August 2, 1990 and January 2, 1992, OR
  3. For more than 180 consecutive days, other than for training, any part of which occurred after January 31, 1955 and before October 15, 1976, OR
  4. Between April 28, 1952 and July 1, 1955 OR
  5. In a war, campaign or expedition for which a campaign medal or badge has been authorized.

10 Point Preference:

You are eligible for a 10-point preference if you served at any time, and you:

  1. have a service connected disability, OR
  2. received a Purple Heart.

Other Veteran Hiring Programs You Should Know About

Veterans Recruitment Appointment (VRA)

Veterans Recruitment Appointment (VRA) is an excepted authority that allows an agency to non-competitively appoint an eligible veteran. If you:

  • Served during a war or are in receipt of a campaign badge for service in a campaign or expedition, OR
  • are a disabled veteran, OR
  • are in receipt of an Armed Forces Service Medal (includes the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal) for participation in a military operation, OR
  • are a recently separated veteran (within 3 years of discharge), AND
  • separated under honorable conditions (this means an honorable or general discharge).

You can be appointed under this authority at any grade level up to and including a GS-11 or equivalent. This is an excepted service appointment. Upon satisfactory completion of 2 years of substantially continuous service, you will be converted to the competitive service. If an agency has two or more VRA candidates and at least one is preference eligible, the Veterans’ preference procedures of 5 CFR, part 302 of OPM’s regulations must be applied when using the VRA authority.

Agencies may also use VRA to fill temporary (not to exceed 1 year) or term (more than 1 year but not to exceed 4 years) positions. If you are employed in a temporary or term position under VRA, you will not be converted to the competitive service after 2 years.

There is no limit to the number of times you can apply under VRA, as long as you meet the definition of a covered veteran under applicable law.

You must provide acceptable documentation of your preference or appointment eligibility. The member 4 copy of your DD214, “Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty,” is preferable. If claiming 10 point preference, you will need to submit a Standard Form (SF-15 (PDF file)), “Application for 10-point Veterans’ Preference.”

30% or More Disabled Veteran

The 30% or More Disabled Veteran authority allows an agency to non-competitively appoint any veteran with a 30% or more service-connected disability.

You are eligible if you:

  • retired from active military service with a service-connected disability rating of 30% or more, OR
  • have a rating by the Department of Veterans Affairs showing a compensable service-connected disability of 30% or more.

This authority can be used to make temporary (at least 60 days but not to exceed 1 year) or term (more than 1 year, but not more than 4) appointments in the competitive service. There is no grade level restriction. There is no requirement that you be converted to a permanent position, but an agency has the authority to convert such a position to a permanent position if it chooses to do so.

The agency would first place you on a time limited appointment of at least 60 days and could then convert that appointment to a permanent appointment at management’s discretion. When the authority is used to meet a time-limited need, however, you will not be converted to a permanent appointment.

You must provide acceptable documentation of your preference or appointment eligibility. The member 4 copy of your DD214, “Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty,” is preferable. If claiming 10 point preference, you will need to submit a Standard Form (SF-15 (PDF file)), “Application for 10-point Veterans’ Preference.”

Disabled Veterans Enrolled in a VA Training Program

Disabled veterans eligible for training under the VA vocational rehabilitation program may enroll for training or work experience at an agency under the terms of an agreement between the agency and VA. While enrolled in the VA program, the veteran is not a Federal employee for most purposes but is a beneficiary of the VA.

Training is tailored to the individual’s needs and goals, so there is no set length. If the training is intended to prepare the individual for eventual appointment in the agency rather than just provide work experience, the agency must focus the training on enabling the veteran to meet the qualification requirements for the position.

Upon successful completion, the host agency and VA give the veteran a Certificate of Training showing the occupational series and grade level of the position for which trained. The Certificate of Training allows any agency to appoint the veteran noncompetitively under a status quo appointment which may be converted to career or career-conditional at any time.

Special Hiring Authorities for Veterans

Special Hiring Authorities for Veterans are just that…designed for veterans. Knowing about these authorities and identifying your eligibility will enhance your job search. These special authorities represent a few of many appointing authorities that agencies can use entirely at their discretion. Veterans are not entitled to appointment under any of these authorities. Check the vacancy announcements, which should clearly state “Who May Apply.”

Go to Feds Hire Vets for U.S. Office of Personnel Management’s Governmentwide Veterans Employment Website

Schedule A Hiring

Though not specifically for veterans, the Schedule A authority for Persons With Intellectual Disabilities, Severe Physical Disabilities and Psychiatric Disabilities, 5 CFR 213.3102(u), is an excepted authority that agencies can use to appoint eligible veterans who have a severe physical, psychological, or intellectual disability.

 

 

Cyber Investigations

Cybersecurity Job Category: Cyber Investigations

Cyber Warriors that work in “Cyber Investigations” investigate cybersecurity events or crimes related to information technology (IT) systems, networks, and digital evidence. The two cybersecurity “Investigations” sub-specialties are:

Cyber Investigator – Applies tactics, techniques, and procedures for a full range of investigative tools and processes to include, but not limited to, interview and interrogation techniques, surveillance, counter surveillance, and surveillance detection, and appropriately balances the benefits of prosecution versus intelligence gathering.

Digital Forensics Technician – Collects, processes, preserves, analyzes, and presents computer-related evidence in support of network vulnerability mitigation and/or criminal, fraud, counterintelligence, or law enforcement investigations.

To learn more about becoming a Cyber Warrior, check out the College Recon Guide to Cybersecurity Careers.

Cyber Defense Analyst

Cybersecurity Job Description: Cyber Defense Analyst

A Cyber Defense Analyst’s job is to use defensive measures and information collected from a variety of sources to identify, analyze, and report events that occur or might occur within the network to protect information, information systems, and networks from threats.

Below is a sampling of the tasks and responsibilities for the Cyber Defense Analyst’s specialty:

  • Analyze network traffic to identify anomalous activity and potential threats to network resources.
  • Document and escalate incidents (including event’s history, status, and potential impact for further action) that may cause ongoing and immediate impact to the environment.
  • Perform event correlation using information gathered from a variety of sources to gain situational awareness and determine the effectiveness of an observed attack.
  • Perform security reviews and identify security gaps and make strategy recommendations to eliminate risks.
  • Perform cyber defense trend analysis and reporting and provide daily summary reports of network events and activity relevant to cyber defense practices.
  • Receive and analyze network alerts from various sources and determine possible causes of such alerts.
  • Provide timely detection, identification, and alerting of possible attacks/intrusions, and misuse activities and distinguish these incidents and events from benign activities.
  • Use cyber defense tools for continual monitoring and analysis of system activity to identify malicious activity.
  • Analyze identified malicious activity to determine weaknesses exploited, exploitation methods, effects on system and information.
  • Isolate and remove malware.
  • Notify designated managers, cyber incident responders, and cybersecurity service provider team members of suspected cyber incidents and articulate the event’s history, status, and potential impact for further action in accordance with the organization’s cyber incident response plan.
  • Provide advice and input for Disaster Recovery, Contingency, and Continuity of Operations Plans.

Visit the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Careers and Studies website for an exhaustive list of the tasks and responsibilities for Cyber Defense Analysts.

Cyber Defense Analyst Job Requirements

As a rule the certifications, education, and training recommendations for entry level employment are more flexible than mid-level and leadership level employment.

Recommended Certifications: Certifications addressing new attack vectors (emphasis on cloud computing technology, mobile platforms and tablet computers), new vulnerabilities, existing threats to operating environments,

Recommended Education: A minimum of an AS degree in the following areas is helpful, but not always a requirement in areas like: Computer science, cybersecurity, information technology, software engineering, information systems, or computer engineering.

Recommended Training: System administrator, basic cyber analyst/operator, intermediate cyber, hunt methodologies, cyber threat modeling.

Be sure to visit the NICCS website to learn more about getting the proper certifications and training needed to be successful in the Cybersecurity Career Field.

To learn more about becoming a Cyber Warrior, check out the College Recon Guide to Cybersecurity Careers.

Cybersecurity Incident Response Specialist

Cybersecurity Job Description: Incident Response Specialist

An Incident Response Specialist responds to crises or urgent situations within the pertinent domain to mitigate immediate and potential threats. Uses mitigation, preparedness, and response and recovery approaches, as needed, to maximize survival of life, preservation of property, and information security. Investigates and analyzes all relevant response activities.

Below is a sampling of the abilities, tasks and responsibilities for the Cybersecurity Incident Response specialty:

  • Design incident response for cloud service models.
  • Apply techniques for detecting host and network-based intrusions using intrusion detection technologies.
  • Coordinate and provide expert technical support to enterprise-wide cyber defense technicians to resolve cyber defense incidents
  • Collect and organize incident data to identify specific vulnerabilities and make recommendations that enable expeditious remediation.
  • Perform cyber defense incident triage (assessment and damage control), to include determining scope, urgency, and potential impact, identifying the specific vulnerability, and making recommendations that enable expeditious remediation.
  • Perform cyber defense trend analysis and reporting.
  • Perform initial, forensically sound collection of images and inspect to discern possible mitigation/remediation on enterprise systems.
  • Perform real-time cyber defense incident handling (e.g., forensic collections, intrusion correlation and tracking, threat analysis, and direct system remediation) tasks to support deployable Incident Response Teams (IRTs).
  • Receive and analyze network alerts from various sources within the network and determine possible causes of such alerts.
  • Track and document cyber defense incidents from initial detection through final resolution.
  • Employ approved defense-in-depth principles and practices (e.g., defense-in-multiple places, layered defenses, security robustness).
  • Collect intrusion artifacts (e.g., source code, malware, Trojans) and use discovered data to enable mitigation of potential cyber defense incidents within the enterprise.
  • Serve as technical expert and liaison to law enforcement personnel and explain incident details as required.
  • Coordinate with intelligence analysts to correlate threat assessment data.
  • Write and publish after action reviews.
  • Monitor external data sources (e.g., cyber defense vendor sites, Computer Emergency Response Teams, Security Focus) to maintain currency of cyber defense threat condition and determine which security issues may have an impact on the enterprise.
  • Coordinate incident response functions.

Visit the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Careers and Studies website for an exhaustive list of the tasks and responsibilities for Incident Response Specialists.

Incident Response Specialist Job Requirements

As a rule the certifications, education, and training recommendations for entry level employment are more flexible than mid-level and leadership level employment.

Recommended Certifications: Certifications addressing new attack vectors (emphasis on cloud computing technology, mobile platforms and tablet computers), new vulnerabilities, existing threats to operating environments, advanced IDS concepts, applications protocols.

Recommended Education: A minimum of an AS degree in the following areas is helpful, but not always a requirement: Computer science, cybersecurity, information technology, software engineering, information systems, or computer engineering.

Recommended Training: System administrator, basic cyber analysis and operations.

Be sure to visit the NICCS website to learn more about getting the proper certifications and training needed to be successful in the Cybersecurity Career Field.

To learn more about becoming a Cyber Warrior, check out the College Recon Guide to Cybersecurity Careers.

Cyber Vulnerability Assessment and Management Specialist

Cybersecurity Job Description: Vulnerability Assessment/Management Specialist

A Vulnerability Assessment and Management specialist conducts assessments of threats and vulnerabilities; determines deviations from acceptable configurations, enterprise or local policy; assesses the level of risk; and develops and/or recommends appropriate mitigation countermeasures in operational and nonoperational situations.

  • Below is a sampling of the abilities, tasks and responsibilities for the Vulnerability Assessment and Management specialty:
  • Analyzes organization’s cyber defense policies and configurations and evaluate compliance with regulations and organizational directives.
  • Conducts and/or support authorized penetration testing on enterprise network assets.
  • Maintains a deployable cyber defense audit toolkit (e.g., specialized cyber defense software and hardware) to support cyber defense audit missions.
  • Prepares audit reports that identify technical and procedural findings, and provide recommended remediation strategies/solutions.
  • Conducts required reviews as appropriate within environment (e.g., Technical Surveillance, Countermeasure Reviews [TSCM], TEMPEST countermeasure reviews).
  • Performs technical (evaluation of technology) and nontechnical (evaluation of people and operations) risk and vulnerability assessments of relevant technology focus areas (e.g., local computing environment, network and infrastructure, enclave boundary, supporting infrastructure, and applications).
  • Consults with organizations’ leadership and makes recommendations regarding the selection of cost-effective security controls to mitigate risk (e.g., protection of information, systems and processes).

Visit the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Careers and Studies website for an exhaustive list of the tasks and responsibilities.

The following certification, education, and training is recommended for positions in Cyber Security Analysis: are required for each level of cybersecurity analysis employment:

Vulnerability Assessment Job Requirements

As a rule the certifications, education, and training recommendations for entry level employment are more flexible than mid-level and leadership level employment.

Recommended Certifications: Certifications addressing new attack vectors (emphasis on cloud computing technology, mobile platforms and tablet computers), new vulnerabilities, existing threats to operating environments, managing, maintaining, troubleshooting, installing, configuring basic network infrastructure..

Recommended Education: A minimum of an AS degree in the following areas: Computer science, cybersecurity, information technology, software engineering, information systems, computer engineering.

Recommended Training: Systems administration, basic cyber analysis/operations, intermediate cyber core, cyber threat modeling.

Be sure to visit the NICCS website to learn more about getting the proper certifications and training needed to be successful in the Cybersecurity Career Field.

To learn more about becoming a Cyber Warrior, check out the College Recon Guide to Cybersecurity Careers.

Cyber Defense Infrastructure Support

Cyber Job Description: Cyber Defense Infrastructure Support

A Cyber Defense Infrastructure support tech’s job is to test, implement, deploy, maintain, review, and administer the infrastructure hardware and software that are required to effectively manage the computer network defense service provider network and resources. A CDI monitors the network to actively remediate unauthorized activities.

Below is a sampling of the abilities, tasks and responsibilities for the Cyber Defense Infrastructure support specialty:

  • Apply cybersecurity and privacy principles to organizational requirements (relevant to confidentiality, integrity, availability, authentication, non-repudiation).
  • Coordinate with Cyber Defense Analysts to manage and administer the updating of rules (e.g., intrusion detection/protection systems, antivirus, and content blacklists) for specialized cyber defense applications.
  • Perform system administration on specialized cyber defense applications and systems (e.g., antivirus, audit and remediation).
  • Assist in identifying, prioritizing, and coordinating the protection of critical cyber defense infrastructure and key resources.
  • Build, install, configure, and test dedicated cyber defense hardware.
  • Assist in assessing the impact of implementing and sustaining a dedicated cyber defense infrastructure.
  • Administer test bed(s), and test and evaluate applications, hardware infrastructure, rules/signatures, access controls, and configurations.
  • Create, edit, and manage network access control lists on specialized firewalls and intrusion prevention systems.
  • Identify potential conflicts with implementation of any cyber defense tools.
  • Implement Risk Management Framework (RMF)/Security Assessment and Authorization (SA&A) requirements for dedicated cyber defense systems within the enterprise, and document and maintain records for them.

Visit the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Careers and Studies website for an exhaustive list of the tasks and responsibilities.

Job Requirements

As a rule the certifications, education, and training recommendations for entry level employment are more flexible than mid-level and leadership level employment.

Recommended Certifications: Certifications addressing authentication, security testing, intrusion detection/prevention, incident response and recovery, attacks and countermeasures, cryptography, malicious code countermeasures, system security, network infrastructure, access control, cryptography, assessments and audits, organizational security.

Recommended Education: A minimum of an AS degree in the following areas is helpful, but not always a requirement: Computer science, cybersecurity, information technology, software engineering, information systems, computer engineering.

Recommended Training: System administrator, basic cyber analyst/operator training, security essentials, intermediate cyber, hunt methodologies.

Be sure to visit the NICCS website to learn more about getting the proper certifications and training needed to be successful in the Cybersecurity Career Field.

To learn more about becoming a Cyber Warrior, check out the College Recon Guide to Cybersecurity Careers.

Cyber Oversight and Governance

Cybersecurity Job Category: Cyber Oversight and Governance

Cyber Warriors that work in “Cyber Oversight and Governance” provide leadership, management, direction, or development and advocacy so the organization may effectively conduct cybersecurity work. The “Cyber Oversight” sub-specialties include:

Cybersecurity Manager – The Cybersecurity Manager oversees the cybersecurity program of an information system or network, including managing information security implications within the organization, specific program, or other area of responsibility, to include strategic, personnel, infrastructure, requirements, policy enforcement, emergency planning, security awareness, and other resources.

Executive Cyber Leader – An executive leader supervises, manages, and/or leads work and workers performing cyber and cyber-related and/or cyber operations work.

Legal Advisor and Advocate – The advisor/advocate provides legally sound advice and recommendations to leadership and staff on a variety of relevant topics within the pertinent subject domain. Advocates legal and policy changes and makes a case on behalf of client via a wide range of written and oral work products, including legal briefs and proceedings.

Program/Project Manager and Acquisitions Officer – The leader in this position applies knowledge of data, information, processes, organizational interactions, skills, and analytical expertise, as well as systems, networks, and information exchange capabilities to manage acquisition programs. Executes duties governing hardware, software, and information system acquisition programs and other program management policies. Provides direct support for acquisitions that use information technology (IT) (including National Security Systems), applying IT-related laws and policies, and provides IT-related guidance throughout the total acquisition life cycle.

Strategic Planning and Policy Manager – Develops policies and plans and/or advocates for changes in policy that support organizational cyberspace initiatives or required changes/enhancements.

Training, Education, and Awareness Executive – Conducts training of personnel within pertinent subject domain. Develops, plans, coordinates, delivers and/or evaluates training courses, methods, and techniques as appropriate.

To learn more about becoming a Cyber Warrior, check out the College Recon Guide to Cybersecurity Careers.

Cyber Operations

Cybersecurity Job Category: Cyber Operations

Cyber Warriors that work in “Cyber Operations” provide specialized denial and deception operations and collection of cybersecurity information that may be used to develop intelligence. The Operations sub-specialties include:

All-Source Collection Manager – Collection Managers identify  collection authorities and environment; incorporate priority information requirements into collection management and develop concepts to meet their leadership’s intent. They also determine capabilities of available collection assets, identify new collection capabilities; and construct and disseminate collection plans. In addition to monitoring execution of tasked collections to ensure effective execution of the collection plan.

Cyber Operations Planner – Cyber planners perform in-depth joint targeting and cybersecurity planning process. They gather information and develop detailed operational plans and orders supporting requirements. Planners also conduct strategic and operational-level planning across the full range of operations for integrated information and cyberspace operations.

Cyber Operator – The cyber operator, is responsible for gathering evidence on criminal or foreign intelligence entities to mitigate possible or real-time threats, protect against espionage or insider threats, foreign sabotage, international terrorist activities, or to support other intelligence activities.

To learn more about becoming a Cyber Warrior, check out the College Recon Guide to Cybersecurity Careers.

Cyber Analysis

Cybersecurity Job Category: Cyber Analysis

Cyber Warriors that work in “Cyber Analysis” perform highly specialized reviews and evaluations of incoming cybersecurity information to determine its usefulness for intelligence. The cybersecurity “Analysis” sub-specialties include:

All-Source Analyst – Analyzes threat information from multiple sources, disciplines, and agencies across the Intelligence Community. Synthesizes and places intelligence information in context; draws insights about the possible implications.

Exploitation Analyst – Collaborates to identify access and collection gaps that can be satisfied through cyber collection and/or preparation activities. Leverages all authorized resources and analytic techniques to penetrate targeted networks.

Language Analyst – Applies language and culture expertise with target/threat and technical knowledge to process, analyze, and/or disseminate intelligence information derived from language, voice and/or graphic material. Creates and maintains language-specific databases and working aids to support cyber action execution and ensure critical knowledge sharing. Provides subject matter expertise in foreign language-intensive or interdisciplinary projects.

Target Analyst – Conducts advanced cyber analysis of collection and open-source data to ensure target continuity; to profile targets and their activities; and develop techniques to gain more target information. Determines how targets communicate, move, operate and live based on knowledge of target technologies, digital networks, and the applications on them.

Threat Analyst – Identifies and assesses the capabilities and activities of cybersecurity criminals or foreign intelligence entities; produces findings to help initialize or support law enforcement and counterintelligence investigations or activities.

To learn more about becoming a Cyber Warrior, check out the College Recon Guide to Cybersecurity Careers.

Cyber Administration

Cybersecurity Job Category: Cyber Administration

Cyber Warriors that work as “Cyber Administrators” provide the customer support, system administration, and maintenance necessary to ensure effective and efficient information technology (IT) system performance and security. Cyber Administrations is one of the largest cybersecurity job categories. The Cyber Administration category sub-specialties include the following:

Customer Service and Technical Support Technician

Addresses problems; installs, configures, troubleshoots, and provides maintenance and training in response to customer requirements or inquiries (e.g., tiered-level customer support). Typically provides initial incident information to the Incident Response (IR) Specialty.

Data Administration Specialist

This includes both data administration and data analysis. The data specialist develops and administers databases and/or data management systems that allow for the storage, query, protection, and utilization of data. The Data analysis role examines data from multiple disparate sources with the goal of providing security and privacy insight. Designs and implements custom algorithms, workflow processes, and layouts for complex, enterprise-scale data sets used for modeling, data mining, and research purposes.

Knowledge Management Specialist

This position is responsible for management and administration processes and tools that enable the organization to identify, document, and access intellectual capital and information content.

Network Services Technician

This person installs, configures, tests, operates, maintains, and manages networks and their firewalls, including hardware (e.g., hubs, bridges, switches, multiplexers, routers, cables, proxy servers, and protective distributor systems) and software that permit the sharing and transmission of all spectrum transmissions of information to support the security of information and information systems.

System Administrator

System administrators are responsible for setting up and maintaining a system or specific components of a system (e.g. for example, installing, configuring, and updating hardware and software; establishing and managing user accounts; overseeing or conducting backup and recovery tasks; implementing operational and technical security controls; and adhering to organizational security policies and procedures).

Systems Analyst

The Systems analyst studies an organization’s current computer systems and procedures, and designs information systems solutions to help the organization operate more securely, efficiently, and effectively. Brings business and information technology (IT) together by understanding the needs and limitations of both.

To learn more about becoming a Cyber Warrior, check out the College Recon Guide to Cybersecurity Careers.

 

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Cybersecurity Career Guide – How to Become a Cyber Warrior

How to Become a Cyber Warrior – Cybersecurity Career Guide

Every day we hear that another company, organization, or government agency has had a data breach. Big names like Facebook, Nike, LinkedIn, and even the Department of Homeland Security have become data breach victims. According to the University of San Diego, “the annual cost of cyber crime around the globe will soon reach $6 trillion annually.”

Cyber-attacks destroy companies, wreck lives, and threaten our national defense. The attacks continue to increase in both quantity and ferocity. Rick Kam, founder of IDExperts, says “these attacks come from an unseen enemy that continuously changes their tactics.” The hackers use everything from brute force attacks to fraud to break into databases, steal personal identities, and invade personal computers, everyday – worldwide.

If you have an active Security Clearance, it is like having your golden ticket for many government agencies and private sector companies; especially government contractors.

Cybersecurity, an In-Demand Career

That’s why Cybersecurity has become one of the “in-demand” careers for 2020 and beyond. According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, the rising demand for cybersecurity professionals (Cyber Warriors) exceeds nearly every other career field. In fact, there are approximately 350,000 cybersecurity jobs currently unfilled in the U.S. Other sources indicate that there will be at least 3.5 million unfilled cybersecurity jobs worldwide by 2021.

There are thousands of unfilled cybersecurity jobs within the U.S. government alone –

If you have an active Security Clearance, it is like having your golden ticket for many government agencies and private sector companies; especially government contractors. The need is so great, that many companies are willing to hire vets with an active clearance and train them to fit the company’s specific job requirements.

Cybersecurity Jobs

As a Cyber Warrior your job could entail developing software, launching white hat attacks to check vulnerability, analyzing and responding to cyber attacks, helping customers deal with a data breach, or helping to remove the viruses that invade people’s personal computers.

Cyber Warriors can choose to focus on any of the many different areas within the Cybersecurity field. One of the largest areas of specialization is Protection and Defense. This category of cybersecurity includes specialties such as:

Other areas of cybersecurity expertise include:

Cybersecurity Salary

According to the University of San Diego, those who work in the cybersecurity industry can expect to earn a significantly high salary. For instance, top-level chief information security officers can command as much as $420,000 annually. Most people starting out can expect to make a median salary between $75,000 and $100,000 a year depending on the position. For example an Information Security Crime Investigator/Forensics Expert starts around the $75,000 level, which increases with experience and certifications.

Cybersecurity Job Requirements

So, what education and/or training is required to get started? According to the Department of Labor, Information Security Analysts usually need a bachelor’s degree in computer science, information assurance, programming, or a related field. However, many firms hire entry level cybersecurity “customer service specialists” with AS degrees and provide the training needed to earn the proper certifications – such as DB2, COBOL, and/or SQL.

According to USAJobs, the minimum requirement for candidates for government Cybersecurity/IT analyst jobs is 3 years general experience in administrative or technical work. This requirement can be covered your military experience  and your veteran status can count for 5 or 10 points in the federal hiring process.

According to the Andrew Plato, CEO of Anitian (a Cybersecurity company), veterans already have what it takes to get started in cybersecurity. Plato explains that vets have the key attributes needed to be successful in cybersecurity – “a warrior ethos and an intrinsic desire to serve and protect; the technical skills and knowledge can be trained.”

No matter where you start, at some point you will need to have specialized Cybersecurity credentials like, CISSP – Certified Information Systems Security Professional, CAP – Certified Authorization Professional, or SSCP – Systems Security Certified Practitioner, if you want to be competitive for the best jobs and 6 figure salaries. The National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE) is a great resource for certification and education opportunities for veterans.

NEW – The VET TEC (Veteran Employment Through Technology Education Courses) is a cool new pilot program from the Department of Veterans Affairs. VET TEC courses can help you start to build on your career as a Cyber Warrior.

Cybersecurity Work Environment

One of the best parts of the job is that cybersecurity specialists can work from anywhere. It really depends on the employer or type of cybersecurity role you have, but many Cyber Warriors have the option to work from home these days.

Next Steps

So, if you think a high paying career fighting an “unseen enemy” on virtual battlefield sounds cool, then you should investigate a career in cybersecurity. The opportunities are virtually limitless. You can start by finding the cybersecurity specialty that most interests you. Then find a school that offers the degree and certifications needed to get you on the path to a career as a Cyber Warrior.

Could a Role as an Account Executive Be the Perfect Career for You?

Sales Account Executive: Why This Could Be Your Dream Job

Wait, before you click away, hear me out. I realize that the thought of being a an Account Executive (a.k.a Sales Representative) may not align with what you thought of as your post-military “dream” career. But keep in mind that what you may think about sales, really comes down to how you think about sales. Let me explain…

Let’s start by asking, what do you want from your post-military career? Are you hoping for a career analyzing situations and helping people solve problems, that pays a good salary with a great opportunity to move up the ranks? If you said yes, then we may be on to something.

How you think about sales

Many people think an Account Executive’s job is to simply sell products, in fact your perception of sales may be tainted by your past experiences with pushy sales representatives and used car salesmen.

But, the AE’s role is much more about helping clients find solutions that can make their companies more profitable, their employees more productive, their processes more efficient, or their personal lives more convenient, meaningful, stress-free, or enjoyable.

Personally, I think Account Executives should be known as Solution Consultants. When you see the AE role as an opportunity to come along side and help others solve problems, the job stops being about about selling products and more about helping customers discover the solutions your company’s products can offer.

Consider the salary

As for salary, Glassdoor reports that the average salary for an AE is about $63,000 per year, with additional cash compensation (commissions) of $31,000.

That is just the median salary; Account Executive salaries can go well into the six-figure range. For example, an AE working at a large software company can make upwards of $350,000 a year, while an AE working at a smaller manufacturing firm may make somewhere in the range of $80,000 a year.

You already have what it takes

As a veteran, you have already demonstrated an ability to problem solve and work with others to ensure the success of your unit and/or completion of a mission. If you are like many veterans you may have given some thought to the idea of going into consulting – analyzing, problem solving, helping others, and sharing your insight and expertise.

An AE needs the following fundamental skills and characteristics to be successful:

  • Communication Skills
  • Organization Skills
  • Problem Solving
  • Negotiating
  • Determination
  • Focused on Goals

Sales or Solutions? You choose

The reality is that no business can survive without committed, knowledgeable, ethical, and hard-working Account Executives (Solutions Consultants). Just like no company can survive without someone to help them determine which products will help their company be competitive and efficient.

Don’t let your bias about sales keep you from a career in problem solving, helping others, sharing your insight and expertise.

In the end, being an Account Executive is all what you make of it. You can approach it from the old-school salesperson point of view, or you can take on the solutions consultant approach and become a vital part of your client’s and your company’s success.

 

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CHECKLIST – Find the College That Fits Your Career Goals

How to Find the College That Fits Your Post-Military Career Goals

Finding the school that fits your goals, scheduling, and is covered by your benefits is not as cut and dry as it may seem, but it is much easier if you have already done your homework.

If you have followed the first two checklist items you should be fairly clear on your career path and degree requirements, which means that some of the criteria for making a good match have already been determined – degree availability, GI Bill and/or Tuition Assistance eligibility.

However, there are a few additional factors to consider before narrowing down the list of potential schools.

Decision Point #1: What Is Most Important (to You)?

You must now figure out what type of school you want. What is more important to you?

Here are some factors to consider:

  • The prestige of the school?
  • The availability of classes?
  • State school or a private institution?
  • Respect for your military service?
  • A school that supports veterans?
  • Do you prefer online, on-campus, or both?

The following resources were developed to help you weigh these factors before making taking the plunge:

One Last Tip Before Choosing a School

Shop around and have at least 2 back-up schools, because you never know what may happen.  You may find that you don’t meet the enrollment criteria or you may find that class availability could make it difficult to graduate on time. This is more common than you may know.  Many popular state schools are short staffed leaving students competing for required classes.

The above are things you can and should ask your advisor before you sign anything.  That is why it is good to have a back-up plan. Don’t get too attached to the idea of attending a certain school. Don’t make the mistake of changing your major just to attend a given school – pick a different school.

 

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Know Your Education Benefits: A Checklist

Education Benefits Checklist for Military and Veterans

Far too many veterans make the mistake of diving into school without fully understanding their education benefits.

The fact is that each of your military and veteran education programs have specific policies, regulations, and limitations. Not knowing how they work can led to delays, out-of-pocket expenses, embarrassment, or worse – lost benefits. Simply put, there is too much at stake to make a mistake.

For example, veterans fail to verify that a chosen degree program is approved for use with the GI Bill before enrolling. You need to keep in mind that just because a school is listed by the VA for use with GI Bill, doesn’t mean that every degree program at the school has been approved.

The VA Approves Programs, Not Schools

The VA doesn’t actually approve a school, they approve each degree program at the school. In many cases a program may not be approved yet due to the newness of the program or other technical issues.

Read about “Lessons Learned” for more examples of how not fully understanding education benefits can cost you time, money, and may end up causing you to lose your benefits.

Here are some resources to help you understand your education benefits:

Once you have are confident that you fully understand your education benefits you will be ready to take the find the college that fits your career goals.

Pre-College Checklist Review:

Here are some great resources for you:

 

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Determine Your Career Path and Education Goals

How to Determine Your Career Path and Education Goals

It isn’t enough to just want to go to school; the time money and effort required demands that you make some hard choices upfront. Unlike a teenager whose parents are footing the bill, you can’t afford to make your education decisions on the fly.

Decision Point #1: Want Do I Want to be When You Grow Up?

This may seem like an odd question for an adult to ask, but it is the question nearly all service members of all paygrades and all ages ask themselves as they prepare for their reintegration into the civilian workforce.

You may not know exactly what job you want to do, but you need to at least settle on a career field before you commit a degree program or school. Here are some of the questions you should ask yourself:

Do I Like The Job I’m Doing Now?

Let me clarify, are you happy with your military occupation? If so, there are ways to tie your current MOS/Rating/AFSC. Most military specialties can be tied to a civilian career field, using an online Military Skills Translator can help you identify civilian careers that require the some or all of your military skills and experiences.

Do I Have A Dream Job In Mind?

As a GI Bill eligible service member or veteran, you have the unique opportunity to hit reset. This gives you the chance to restart and focus on that dream job you always wanted.

What Do I Most Like To Do?

Some of the best advice you ever get is to follow your passion. If have a hobby or activity that makes you happy, you should explore career options that give you a chance to get paid for doing what you enjoy most.

If you can’t clearly answer these questions, all is not lost, your base Education Services Office or local Department of Veterans Affairs representative can provide counseling and assessments to help you determine the career path that best suits you. In addition, you have access to several online resources to help you make sound career and education decisions, here are the four we recommend:

  • DANTES Career Assessment Tools – The Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Services (DANTES) offer an online resource to help you plan for the future. Learn about your interests, skills and work values and use those results to build a personal career plan, explore occupational information and plan for your future success.
  • Career Scope – This Department of Veterans Affairs career resource helps veterans determine the best career path for their transition to civilian life.
  • Military Skills Translator – The Military.com skills translator will show you a list of current job openings based on your military occupation. This list often produces career suggestions you may not have ever considered before.
  • How to Decide About School – Making the decision to go to school isn’t always easy and there are some things you do have to think about before you decide what to do.

Decision Point #2: Do I Need A Degree, Certification, or Licensure?

Depending on the answers to the previous questions, you may find that pursuing a degree right now may not be right for you. However, you will find that although a degree isn’t needed to get started on your civilian career, a degree will improve your employment opportunities, your entry level, and increase your annual salary. In some cases you will find that you need a combination of a college degree, certification, and licensure to get the best opportunities.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook is the government’s premier source of career guidance featuring hundreds of occupations. This tool can help you learn more about a given career choice including salary, education requirements, and job descriptions. It can also help you determine which degree’s best align with your career goals.

Decision Point #3: What Is My Education Goal?

Like the first decision point, you will need to set your career and education goals and develop an action plan. Setting your goals before moving on to the next item on you checklist will ensure you don’t wander off course. Once you have decided on you career path, it will be important to set SMART goals and develop your personal action plan. Learn more about smart goals and action planning.

Here are some additional resources to help you set your career on the right path:

Once you have determined your career path and education goals; you will need to complete the next checklist item and learn more about your benefits. Becoming an expert on your own education benefits before you choose a school will ensure you avoid delays, out-of-pocket expenses.

 

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Civilian Jobs After the Military For:

 

 

Veterans: Enroll & Launch Your Education Adventure

Now it’s time to enroll and launch your education adventure.  It is important to note that the enrollment process, procedures, and requirements differ from school to school.

You may find that some schools require minimum scores on the SAT or ACT assessment exams.  While others may waive these requirements for adult learners like veterans. In addition, some schools may require you to take placement exams to determine if you need remedial courses.

I’m Enrolled, What’s Next?

It is during the enrollment stage that you will need to submit your Joint Services Transcript (JST) and in some cases you may be asked for your high school transcripts. Learn more about gathering and submitting transcripts.

You will also want to include any documentation or scores for any of CLEP Exams or DSST exams you may have taken in the past.

Here are some resources to help you navigate this final step:

Your Pre-Launch checklist is now complete. The list was designed to ensure you have a firm footing as you prepare to start college. We have several resources and articles that can help you as you complete the enrollment phase.

List of Education Resources for Veteransy

Here is a quick list of resources to help you succeed in school:

 

 

 

5 Tips to Ensure a Solid Start to Your College Experience

5 Tips to Ensure a Solid Start to Your College Experience

Service members tend to transfer several times throughout their military careers. The military has processes to ensure that your transfer goes as smoothly as possible. No matter where you go in the military you will find people you have much in common with a familiar military culture and structure.

Colleges and universities also have processes to help new students quickly assimilate into the school culture and processes. Schools have orientation days and connect new students with upperclassman to help them learn the ropes. But unlike your PCS experiences, you will quickly realize that you have very little in common with your fellow students and most schools tend to lack structure. But don’t let that slow you down. There are several easy things you can do to help you ease into the world of academia.

The following 5 tips will help you quickly adjust to campus life:

Be sure to attend the orientation events

Pretty much every college or university has an “orientation day.” Don’t blow it off. Although it may seem kind of lame, but the stuff they cover at these events really has value. Most of the time the orientation events are led by upperclassmen who can share the tricks and tips you will need to make the most of the on-campus experience, not to mention the tricks to navigating the campus and school policies.

Find the Veterans Resource Center

Nearly every school has a veteran’s center, one type or another. Most on-campus veterans centers are staffed by veteran education program administrators who are paid by the school to help process your education claims. The veterans center is also a great place to connect with other student veterans.

Join Student Veterans of America

SVA is national organization with local on-campus chapters which are run by your fellow veteran students. There are over 1,300 on-campus chapters, where veterans can find resources to ease their transition to student life. SVA is committed to ensuring you are supported throughout transition through college to employment.

Do Your Own Campus Recon Before School Starts

Cross-campus classes can make it difficult to get from one class to the next on time. Walk the campus, find your classrooms, and plan your routes well before school starts. Knowing the best way to cover the distance in advance will save you from the embarrassment of getting to class late.

Establish Ground Rules with Your Roommate

One of the most common issues students face is getting along with their roommates. Unlike your fellow service members back in the barracks, your new college roommate has likely never been away from home and his or her parent’s house rules. This means that your new roommate is going to be “enjoying” his or her newfound freedom – likely at your expense. Typical roommate conflicts include hygiene, late-night partying, and housekeeping. The best way to address issues before they come up is to have a direct conversation about quiet hours, housekeeping, and privacy expectations.

Better yet, live off campus if possible. With your GI Bill housing stipend (BAH) you can afford a small off-campus apartment – that way you can choose your roommate (if you want) and save money to boot.

These quick five pointers can help you get off to a great start. In the next article we will look at some tips for saving money on textbooks and common school supplies.

 

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A Checklist for College Students as They Begin Their Education Journey  

Your College Degree “Pre-Launch” Checklist

Earning your degree and launching your next career requires focus, effort, and planning. The key to success comes down to five tasks that you need to check off before start.  The following five item checklist will ensure you don’t waste money, time, or effort in the pursuit of your college degree.

Determine Your Career Path and Education Goals

Know what you want from your education. Setting your career goals upfront will help you to make the most of your money, time, and effort.  Learn about choosing your career path to achieve your career goals.

Know Your Benefits

You need to have a deeper understanding of your GI Bill©, Military Tuition Assistance, Student Aid , ACE credits, and Scholarships before you commit to anything. Learn about the hundreds of thousands of dollars that available to help you pay for your degree. Click here to get the details you need on your military and veteran benefits.

Find the College that Fits Your Career Goals

Finding the school that fits your goals, finances, scheduling, and benefits isn’t as simple as it may seem. Learn how to find the school that meets all your needs.

Verify that You and the Degree Program are GI Bill Eligible

Be sure that you have your certificate of eligibility completed and confirm that the degree program you have chosen has been approved by the VA for use with the GI Bill. Not covering these bases before enrolling can set you back and could cost you benefits. Learn how and why this step is critical getting off to a good start.

Research schools with our School Search Tool, or find your perfect fit with our School Matcher.

Launch Your Education Journey

Enrollment processes and requirements differ from school to school. Many schools may require you to take specific placement exams to determine if there is a need for remedial courses. Learn to prepare for the enrollment process.

Remember earning your degree opens a world of possibilities and will set you up for success. While it won’t be easy, you have already proven you have what it takes to earn your degree.

 

NEXT STEP: Get Started Understanding Your Career  and Education Goals

 

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